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Forum topic by jayvansickle posted 09-20-2015 04:50 AM 760 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jayvansickle

16 posts in 540 days


09-20-2015 04:50 AM

I live in northern Indiana and have a 24 X 24 pole building. It has minimal insulation right now. I am looking for a heater to warm up the space and then turn on my kerosene heater to just keep things tolerable. I am retiring in 2 1/2 years and plan then to insulate the building. It can get pretty cold here in the winter. If you have any ideas let me know. I don’t want a wood stove. Other than that the field is wide open.

-- If a parsley farmer goes broke, can they garnish his wages


14 replies so far

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Rick M

7921 posts in 1844 days


#1 posted 09-20-2015 05:09 AM

You might contact some local HVAC guys and see if they will sell you a used heat pump. You don’t need ducting, although it wouldn’t hurt. An electric heat pump might struggle with your winters but if you can live with 60 degrees or so (I like my shop on the cool side) it should be cheaper than propane or kerosene, plus it won’t introduce moisture to the air and cause rust. Insulation is king though, good insulation will be cheaper in the long run.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1773 days


#2 posted 09-20-2015 08:17 AM

If your going to use that shop now and after your retire is just makes no sense not to insulate now. Insulation will be money well spent.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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Woodmaster1

737 posts in 2051 days


#3 posted 09-20-2015 09:32 AM

I live about 40 miles from you. I inulatated my garage and use a bigmaxx gas 50,000 BTU furnace. It added $10.00 a month to my gas bill. The extra $120.00 a year is worth the comfort. I set the thermostat at 60 when not working and 70 when working.

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Redoak49

1951 posts in 1453 days


#4 posted 09-20-2015 11:13 AM

A heat pump will not work in northern Indiana in the winter with the cold temps. Likely, the cheapest heat is natural gas if available. I would put as much insulation as possible and also l look at what to do with the ceiling.

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Tennessee

2410 posts in 1979 days


#5 posted 09-20-2015 11:20 AM

+1 for Woodmaster and Redoak. Too far North for a heat pump.

The natural gas option is the way to go. NOT propane, BTW.

-- Paul, Tennessee, http://www.tsunamiguitars.com

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Jim Finn

2412 posts in 2386 days


#6 posted 09-20-2015 01:16 PM



A heat pump will not work in northern Indiana in the winter with the cold temps. Likely, the cheapest heat is natural gas if available. I would put as much insulation as possible and also l look at what to do with the ceiling.

- Redoak49


In a former life I was a HVAC contractor in southern Wisconsin and this quote is spot on!

-- "You may have your PHD but I have my GED and my DD 214"

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johnstoneb

2143 posts in 1637 days


#7 posted 09-20-2015 01:23 PM

You need to insulate before you even try to heat that size building.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

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joey502

487 posts in 982 days


#8 posted 09-20-2015 01:33 PM

I would also consider adding the insulation sooner than later. Long term it will be much less costly to keep the heat in than it will be to produce it.

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Fred Hargis

3941 posts in 1958 days


#9 posted 09-20-2015 01:45 PM

Couple of things, I have a pole barn and when the conditions are right, it will actually rain in the building. The humidity will condense on the underside of the steel roof and drip down. Given the amount of moisture that a kerosene heater will generate, and the fact that it will be cold outside seems like that could be a real problem with plan A. That aside, you didn’t offer what other fuels are available. if you have nat gas, it would be real hard to find a reason not to have a ceiling hung gas heater. But if you don’t have nat gas, that leaves oil, LP, or electric. Of these by far and away, the cheapest will be LP in terms of operating cost. Electric will be a lot cheaper to install, but the operating cost will be outrageous. My last shop (24×28x9 stick built, detached) used an LP wall furnace, the current one (24×32x8 stick built, detached) also uses an LP gas furnace. It’s 45K ceiling hung and I burned 150 Gallons last year heating it to 65º when I’m in there, and 50º when I’m not. Does the “no wood stove” part include wood pellets? The pellet stoves can be pretty efficient and safe to run. BTW, I do agree with the opinions that insulation comes first, not last.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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Goatlocker

58 posts in 1436 days


#10 posted 09-20-2015 03:13 PM

I would go with a natural gas heater for first choice but an alternative for you since you live in Indiana is either a corn burner or pellet stove. They both supply enough heat that you will be opening doors to cool it off and they can be ducted so that the fire side of it will take outside air for combustion and then exhaust it outside. This would give you a lot of heat with the fire side being isolated from your shop. Depending on usage and price of corn this may be an option.

-- All tyranny needs to gain a foothold is for people of good conscience to remain silent - Thomas Jefferson

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FancyShoes

509 posts in 828 days


#11 posted 09-20-2015 03:34 PM

View jayvansickle's profile

jayvansickle

16 posts in 540 days


#12 posted 09-20-2015 04:01 PM


I live about 40 miles from you. I inulatated my garage and use a bigmaxx gas 50,000 BTU furnace. It added $10.00 a month to my gas bill. The extra $120.00 a year is worth the comfort. I set the thermostat at 60 when not working and 70 when working.

- Woodmaster1

I have been giving thought to a natural gas “garage” heater that hangs. I don’t want to give up the shop floor footage. I will look at the at the Bigmaxx heater. I have learned quite a bit in just the short time I posted this question. Thank you one and all.

-- If a parsley farmer goes broke, can they garnish his wages

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3941 posts in 1958 days


#13 posted 09-20-2015 04:11 PM

When you look at those, consider getting one that’s “direct vent”, meaning it draws in outside air for combustion. This has some measure of safety in a room that may have flammable vapors from finishing, but more importantly (IMHO) is that the working parts are usually sealed or semi sealed. That helps with keeping wood dust off things. My wall furnace in the last shop and the ceiling hung furnace I have in the current shop (a Sterling Garage Guy) are direct vent. Sterling claims it increases the efficiency somewhat as well, though I have my doubts about that….at least in a meaningful amount. The incoming cold air is heated a little by the exhaust as it’s passes past the flue pipe.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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oldnovice

5730 posts in 2832 days


#14 posted 09-20-2015 05:03 PM

Way outside the box! I don’t know if this is suitable for your part of the country.

How about solar hot water circulation. Cheap to use, not too costly to install.
The only operating cost would be the pumps/fans.

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

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