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hand held power planer

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Forum topic by dbw posted 09-19-2015 08:00 PM 1440 views 0 times favorited 24 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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dbw

169 posts in 1417 days


09-19-2015 08:00 PM

Topic tags/keywords: hand held power planer

What do folks think of those 3 1/4” wide hand held power planers as compared to a traditional hand tool.

-- measure 3 times, cut once


24 replies so far

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

7709 posts in 1787 days


#1 posted 09-19-2015 08:33 PM

I have a Makita that I dont use near as much as I could. Just the other day somebody showed how he uses it to sorta “round out” bowl blanks for turning and I thought that was pretty good idea. I’ll probably be using it more and more now.

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

View Texcaster's profile

Texcaster

1240 posts in 1454 days


#2 posted 09-19-2015 09:29 PM

The power planer is primarily a carpenter’s site tool, however it can be used in the workshop. Mine is used with winding sticks to rough dress slabs. In the link the plane has fresh cutters and is set on a “vapor” cut.

http://lumberjocks.com/Texcaster/blog/53473

off topic : The photos show sprung joint, one bolt end caps.

-- Mama calls me Texcaster but my real name is Mr. Earl.

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

4853 posts in 2046 days


#3 posted 09-19-2015 11:36 PM

pretty much a waste of money. Wonder what the heck I was thinking? Bought the same Mikita POS shown above. Makita is right up there with crapsmen in my book.

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2591 posts in 2077 days


#4 posted 09-19-2015 11:48 PM

I have a Makita circular saw and 3 of their sanders (one of them is 30 years old and sees plenty of use). And a grinder. And a drill. None of those tools are crap.

I’ve used a power planer mainly to fit doors to out of square openings in older homes. Handplanes work just as well, just slower. But that can be a benefit in that you don’t remove too much like you can with a power planer.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

3408 posts in 2089 days


#5 posted 09-20-2015 04:05 AM


I have a Makita circular saw and 3 of their sanders (one of them is 30 years old and sees plenty of use). And a grinder. And a drill. None of those tools are crap.

I ve used a power planer mainly to fit doors to out of square openings in older homes. Handplanes work just as well, just slower. But that can be a benefit in that you don t remove too much like you can with a power planer.

- dhazelton

Well BurblyBob is just a little confused about Mikita tools.

Many people have problems using the electric hand plane cause they can take a little skill to use them. I suspect BurblyBob hasn’t use one much.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View tomd's profile

tomd

2103 posts in 3551 days


#6 posted 09-20-2015 04:38 AM

I bought a hand held power planer, what was I thinking ?

-- Tom D

View Mark Wilson's profile

Mark Wilson

2031 posts in 844 days


#7 posted 09-20-2015 06:47 AM

That wacky piece of wood that won’t let your lathe stand still can be convinced into a more-spinnable shape with a little judicious shaving here and there. I’ve seen the same tool used to great effect by one of the masters of sculpted furniture, as well. It’s a lot less messy than an angle grinder or a chainsaw – just hook up a Shop Vac hose. Also, I turn mine upside-down, held in a handscrew clamp, clamped to my workbench, and use it as a small jointer.

-- Mark

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

1770 posts in 2725 days


#8 posted 09-20-2015 07:44 AM

I use mine to cut hours off the labor on a project. I’ve used it on slabs, deck joints, when one rose above the other, for door, for knocking the edge off a pieces of lumber (e.g., working a forty-five) and so on. It’s a valued tool in my shop.

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2591 posts in 2077 days


#9 posted 09-20-2015 11:52 AM

@ Mark Wilson. Please tell me you have all your digits. If they made a little pork chop for it I could see doing that, otherwise I’m too much of a sissy.

Actually, mounting it in some kind of box with a springy pork chop might be a cool thing to have on a jobsite.

View dbw's profile

dbw

169 posts in 1417 days


#10 posted 09-20-2015 03:31 PM

What is a “springy pork chop”?

-- measure 3 times, cut once

View xmastree's profile

xmastree

47 posts in 760 days


#11 posted 09-20-2015 03:37 PM

Even my cheesy Bosch hand planer has come in mighty handy. And if Makita makes a tool that is anything less than top-notch, I haven’t seen it yet.

-- Every tree is a Chistmas tree with its gifts hidden inside.

View Stewbot's profile

Stewbot

199 posts in 864 days


#12 posted 09-20-2015 05:05 PM

Pretty darn handy when fixing wonky walls. Never thought to find a use for it in the shop.

-- Hoopty scoop?

View Bluepine38's profile

Bluepine38

3370 posts in 2866 days


#13 posted 09-20-2015 05:25 PM

I had sold them to log home builders who used the heck out of them, never thought about one for my shop,
guess, I will have to take another look at them.

-- As ever, Gus-the 78 yr young apprentice carpenter

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

7710 posts in 2578 days


#14 posted 09-20-2015 06:11 PM

They are one of the real workhorse tools in wood boatbuilding. There is no better tool for shaping deck beams, timbers, and many other things, even planking.
However the short, consumer models I see around these days are not likely up to the challenge of long hours of heavy use.
This was the standard of the industry when I was building. It’s a Skill 100. I haven’t seen it’s match lately.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View Lynden's profile

Lynden

68 posts in 2927 days


#15 posted 09-20-2015 06:25 PM

I have the Makita pictured above. I’ve used it mainly to flatten walls, ceilings and floors by taking the high spots off of studs and joists. Have also used it on door edges. Makita sells a dust port that fits a shop vac hose. It’s a replacement for the oval port that comes with the older planers.

http://www.makita.com.au/products/accessories/planers-accessories/192082-7-dust-extraction-nozzle-1911b

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