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Forum topic by JoshNZ posted 09-19-2015 04:03 AM 1331 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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JoshNZ

53 posts in 534 days


09-19-2015 04:03 AM

I own an NZ made Tanner 14” band saw which most of you probably won’t know of but it is generally a well regarded manufacture over here, cast base, wheels, and table etc. I’ve owned it for a couple of years now and I have a bunch of questions I should have asked a long time ago really.

1 – Is a saw like this capable of resawing heavy woods up to say 6” thick. Merbau in particular which I have a lot of, or kwila, ipil, whatever you know it as (smokes even the sharpest table saws…). The thickest I have are 1/2” blades of fairly fine tooth counts so I wondered would buying a 3TPI 1” thick blade for it improve its performance resawing 2×6s on their side.

2 – Does replacing the guides with bearing-style guides improve its performance? At the moment they are brass blocks (see photos). And.. Is this likely to be a swap-and-go part or need modification.

3 – Is there a generally accepted method of checking blade tension that doesn’t involve expensive equipment?

And lastly, has anybody gone about making a fence jig for a saw like this? I don’t believe it ever came with one, just a slot for a mitre slide.

If anybody has any idea about all or any of my questions please chime in! Advice will be much appreciated!


20 replies so far

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ElChe

630 posts in 801 days


#1 posted 09-19-2015 04:28 AM

Bearing guides I don’t think will greatly improve resaw performance. I used cool blocks on my delta and they were fine for resawing 6 inch wood Depending on h.p. it should be able to resaw 6” with a good resaw blade. I use a 5/8” kerfmaster similar to woodslicer but cheaper that I bought from spectrum supply. 2-3 tpi works great for resawing. Not sure about making a fence. Before I got a fast track for my delta (now improved as a kreg fence) I just clamped a flat 2×6 and it worked bit required fiddling. I wonder if the kreg would fit in what look to be the pre tapped holes? If not you could drill and tap some holes. Carter sells a magnetic fence bit I’ve not used it.

Finally blade tension I pluck it to get close and then I do a test cut. Snodgrass video on YouTube is recommended bit I think he’s a sales pitch guy for Carter although some of his tricks and tips are useful. Good luck.

-- Tom - Measure twice cut once. Then measure again. Curse. Fudge.

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JoshNZ

53 posts in 534 days


#2 posted 09-19-2015 07:58 AM



Bearing guides I don t think will greatly improve resaw performance. I used cool blocks on my delta and they were fine for resawing 6 inch wood Depending on h.p. it should be able to resaw 6” with a good resaw blade. I use a 5/8” kerfmaster similar to woodslicer but cheaper that I bought from spectrum supply. 2-3 tpi works great for resawing. Not sure about making a fence. Before I got a fast track for my delta (now improved as a kreg fence) I just clamped a flat 2×6 and it worked bit required fiddling. I wonder if the kreg would fit in what look to be the pre tapped holes? If not you could drill and tap some holes. Carter sells a magnetic fence bit I ve not used it.

Finally blade tension I pluck it to get close and then I do a test cut. Snodgrass video on YouTube is recommended bit I think he s a sales pitch guy for Carter although some of his tricks and tips are useful. Good luck.

- ElChe

Thanks for reply Tom I had never heard of cool blocks. Doesn’t look like they are available in NZ but cheap enough to ship from overseas, I will definitely give them a try. I guess while I’m at it I may as well order a resaw blade, any suggestions as to vendors, for both items?

I’m clamping stock to the table for a fence at the moment too but, would be good to have something that adjusts a little quicker. Not my biggest concern right now though.

Blade tension may be a problem with my machine, it seems it gets to a certain point and won’t get any tighter, the spring continues to compress without the pitch of the ‘ping’ increasing. By the time it is maxed I don’t know whether or not it is enough

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fuigb

404 posts in 2422 days


#3 posted 09-19-2015 08:18 AM

Could be that that tensioning spring is shot? How has the saw been used in the past? If you came your tool used then consider the possibility that the previous owner didn’t do you any favors (favours? :) ). I’m thinking of a 14” Shop Fox at my work where the blade has been under constant tension for years. This particular saw is used maybe once a month for rough fabrication so the users wouldn’t notice or care about drift. Your saw has a similar history?

-- - Crud. Go tell your mother that I need a Band-aid.

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JoshNZ

53 posts in 534 days


#4 posted 09-19-2015 09:24 AM

Haha favours – well done :P. I got my saw used from an older gentleman who was a retiring cabinet maker, if I remember correctly. I couldn’t say whether he mistreated it or not, it was in pretty good condition otherwise. I considered the spring may be spent too, I removed it today and it is still tough as hell to squash, but I guess that means nothing. Where would you obtain a new spring is that likely to be a generic part?

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ElChe

630 posts in 801 days


#5 posted 09-19-2015 03:52 PM

Cool blocks aren’t necessary either unless you are like me and forget to properly adjust metal blocks and ruin a blade or two … Or three. Basically a composite that is impregnated with graphite. Brass blocks should be fine and cool looking. Can you post some pics of the innards of the saw and the tension mechanism? Motor specs? I like the retro look of your bandsaw.

No clue where to source blades in NZ. I order blades from Spectrum Supply in USA but not single blades because their shipping is expensive for just one blade. Highlander sells woodslicer. Both kerfmaster and woodslicer come from meat cutting stock so the kerf is thinner. Not sure if your saw can handle a 1” blade. I get excellent results from a 5/8” blade. And on my Delta 14” I used a 1/2” blade also with excellent results.

-- Tom - Measure twice cut once. Then measure again. Curse. Fudge.

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WoodNSawdust

1417 posts in 641 days


#6 posted 09-19-2015 04:37 PM

Seems like there would have to be a physical upper stop that the wheel could not move beyond. Is it possible you are hitting that? Or something is in the way obstructing the wheel from moving any farther?

-- "I love it when a plan comes together" John "Hannibal" Smith

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MrRon

3926 posts in 2708 days


#7 posted 09-19-2015 06:57 PM

You mentioned cutting very hard woods up to 6” thick. That will require a good size motor. The typical size motor on 14” band saws is around 3/4 hp; not adequate for re-sawing wood that thick. I feel you would be over stressing your saw. As far as blades go, I use blades made by L.S. Starrett. A blade with carbide teeth would be in order for very hard woods.

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JoshNZ

53 posts in 534 days


#8 posted 09-19-2015 09:41 PM



Cool blocks aren t necessary either unless you are like me and forget to properly adjust metal blocks and ruin a blade or two … Or three. Basically a composite that is impregnated with graphite. Brass blocks should be fine and cool looking. Can you post some pics of the innards of the saw and the tension mechanism? Motor specs? I like the retro look of your bandsaw.

No clue where to source blades in NZ. I order blades from Spectrum Supply in USA but not single blades because their shipping is expensive for just one blade. Highlander sells woodslicer. Both kerfmaster and woodslicer come from meat cutting stock so the kerf is thinner. Not sure if your saw can handle a 1” blade. I get excellent results from a 5/8” blade. And on my Delta 14” I used a 1/2” blade also with excellent results.

- ElChe

I have no idea where to get woodworking supplies in NZ either even after a Google search. We have cabinets here and they can’t all be imported so… :S lol. I do know of a saw doctor shop nearby and a wood shop supplier nearby I can’t remember seeing BS blades in there but I will call them both Monday. Otherwise I might try one of your suggestions.
Whether I go brass or cool blocks I need something else anyway the worst blocks are barely 1/4” now.

I will go and get some more photos in a little while. The tires are wider than 1”, I would probably give it a go. My biggest problem is probably the blades I have aren’t sharp. I have the blade I got with it on there, and I’ve never known anything else. Takes more force to push stock through than my gut tells me it should with a sharp blade I think.
And… Another question I should have asked actually, when I’m pushing stock through the speed of the cut, and the sound pulses – as if ~2ft of the blade is sharp and the rest is dull. What causes this? Maybe i’ll make a video.


Seems like there would have to be a physical upper stop that the wheel could not move beyond. Is it possible you are hitting that? Or something is in the way obstructing the wheel from moving any farther?

- WoodNSawdust

I wondered this too and checked it all out without the blade on – it is definitely not catching if anything is a problem it is the spring tension.

MrRon I will check the motors hp in a little while too. It is not stamped on the Serial plate so I didn’t bother tipping the saw over to look yet.

Thanks for all the help guys!

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115202 posts in 3042 days


#9 posted 09-19-2015 09:51 PM

A sharp 3tpi blade will make a difference, but some older smaller band saws will not take an 1” wide blade, but I think a 3/4” will still work,I think you can cut thick hardwood as long as you keep your feed rate down.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4230 posts in 1664 days


#10 posted 09-19-2015 09:54 PM

Find a metal supplier near you and get some brass stock the proper dimensions. You can cut your blocks to length and have plenty for years to come. If you can’t get metal, guides can also be made out of hardwood. Google will give you info on how.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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JoshNZ

53 posts in 534 days


#11 posted 09-19-2015 10:24 PM

Yeah I was thinking 1/2” brass stock couldn’t be too hard to find.

I checked the motor also it is only a 1/2 hp. But keeping the feed rate down enough not to stress it should be ok? I do have some bigger motors lying around I will see if I can find one and look at swapping it out.

So here is the tensioning system. The threaded rod pulls up a square nut with a spring on top of it, which pushes the whole carriage upwards in its slot. It is maxed out here (the thread is, or the spring is, I’m not sure) and I have attached a video of what the tension looks like, see if you guys can make anything of it?

This is the lower tire. Is this all that limits the blade thickness?

Here is the video of the tension and a cut. Hard to see the pulsing problem I’m talking about but it is happening. Hard to say how much force I’m pushing with there too, seems like a lot to get the cut started
https://youtu.be/XgLzgtybhcA

And the rest of the photos, for anyone interested

View ChuckV's profile

ChuckV

2880 posts in 2992 days


#12 posted 09-19-2015 11:54 PM

This is the lower tire. Is this all that limits the blade thickness?

The limitation will probably be that you will not be able to provide enough tension to run a wider (say 1”) blade. With insufficient blade tension, it will tend to wander around while cutting.

-- “Big man, pig man, ha ha, charade you are.” ― R. Waters

View JoshNZ's profile

JoshNZ

53 posts in 534 days


#13 posted 09-20-2015 12:20 AM



This is the lower tire. Is this all that limits the blade thickness?

The limitation will probably be that you will not be able to provide enough tension to run a wider (say 1”) blade. With insufficient blade tension, it will tend to wander around while cutting.

- ChuckV

A-ha that makes sense. Can you replace the springs with aftermarket ones to overcome this problem?

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MrUnix

4230 posts in 1664 days


#14 posted 09-20-2015 12:23 AM

A-ha that makes sense. Can you replace the springs with aftermarket ones to overcome this problem?

Yes, and it will cause more problems since you will be trying to operate the machine well above it’s capacity. Most common failures are due to over-tensioning larger blades. Realistically, a 14” band saw can handle up to about 1/2” blades and anything larger is pushing it. Even more so if you run with a riser block.

How do you overcome this problem? You buy a bigger band saw :)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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Picken5

224 posts in 2157 days


#15 posted 09-20-2015 04:31 AM

For a resaw fence you might consider this: http://lumberjocks.com/projects/63012 . I built this for Craftsman BS a few years ago and I think it would be pretty easy to adapt it to your saw. The fence guide was just a piece of angle iron that I bolted to the side of the table after I drilled and tapped a couple of holes. It worked pretty good on that saw.

-- Howard - "Time spent making sawdust is not deducted from one's lifetime." - old Scottish proverb

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