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Curved arbor patio cover

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Forum topic by rrdesigns posted 11-21-2009 02:35 AM 20930 views 0 times favorited 43 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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rrdesigns

526 posts in 2645 days


11-21-2009 02:35 AM

Challenge of the day…seeking ideas on how to build an arbor like structure over a curved patio that is shaped like a grand piano. I have a roof line on one end to start the timbers but will have to rely on posts and stringers for the outside curve. Any ideas?curved patio!http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2740/4120338277_768715f174.jpg(curved patio)

Also, if this is not the right place to ask this question do any of you have suggestions as to where else to post this type of query? I have already posted to HomeRefurbers. Thanks.

-- Beth, Oklahoma, Rambling Road Designs


43 replies so far

View ehegwer's profile

ehegwer

26 posts in 2571 days


#1 posted 11-21-2009 03:07 AM

I’m thinking two circular arbors instead of one more square/rectangular one, but then my designs always lean towards the modern.

-- http://www.MyFirstGarage.com

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tallpaul

27 posts in 3215 days


#2 posted 11-21-2009 03:18 AM

Maybe think about octagonal rather than circular? Hexagon? Pentagon?

-- tallpaul

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TopamaxSurvivor

17654 posts in 3135 days


#3 posted 11-21-2009 05:03 AM

How about an elliptical cloud?

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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rrdesigns

526 posts in 2645 days


#4 posted 11-21-2009 05:27 AM

Okay, but how do you frame the curve? I can envision following the curve of the patio now, but I’m concerned that the curve will force me into so many posts it will feel like a jail inside. I would like to keep the posts at a minimum, maybe six or seven and figure out a way to build strength and a curved silhouette into the roof (which will remain rafters only like an arbor). Maybe a lintel assembly with rafters extending beyond to establish the curve?

-- Beth, Oklahoma, Rambling Road Designs

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a1Jim

115201 posts in 3036 days


#5 posted 11-21-2009 05:33 AM

Hey Beth
Is this patio cover for shade or is it to be water proof.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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TopamaxSurvivor

17654 posts in 3135 days


#6 posted 11-21-2009 05:36 AM

Build the frame for support and let the curve be a fa├žade.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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sras

4391 posts in 2588 days


#7 posted 11-21-2009 07:19 AM

This is an interesting question. It really depends on what the property owners want. For me, I would consider an arbor that is not conntected to the home. Start about 5 ft from the existing structure and create an arbor that follows the outline of the patio – stopping about 5 ft from the building on the other side. I would make the arbor about 5 – 7 ft wide and explore interesting ways to place the cross pieces on the top (something radial). —- on the other hand, if the property owners are not interested then never mind!

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

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TopamaxSurvivor

17654 posts in 3135 days


#8 posted 11-21-2009 07:44 AM

It will be a lot easier to stablize with a connection to the home. A free standing pole structure will require a lot of cross bracing to stand up to the wind.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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jlsmith5963

297 posts in 2807 days


#9 posted 11-21-2009 08:13 AM

If it would be acceptable to have only the top 2×2 members to be cut so the mimic the curve, then you could do the following:
Build a right angled structural post and beam system that would support the 2×2 top members, as is typical and then add the cross members running parallel to the wall with the door. Then add a top layer of 2×2 members that run perpendicular to the wall with the door and end at the edge of the patio curve. In order to get the 2×2s cut correctly lay them out directly on the patio adjusting their spacing so it gives you the desired visual effect . Then trim each 2×2 to whatever length the patio is at its location. Once they have all been trimmed mount them on top the cross members using the same spacing. This design would have no actual curved cuts yet the 2×2 as a group would make a strong visual curve that matches the curve of the patio.

If you need a clearer description let me know, I could probably whip it up in Sketchup.

-- criticism: the art of analyzing and evaluating the quality of an artistic work...

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rrdesigns

526 posts in 2645 days


#10 posted 11-21-2009 08:14 AM

a1Jim, the homeowners (and my) vision is for shade, not full enclosure. Also, for what it is worth, the back of the house faces west. I have 15 feet from the main house to the western edge of the patio and from the northern facing part of the house that projects further west, there is 16 feet of patio before the patio begins its curve another 6 feet to the sidewalk. I would like to leave as much of this area clear as possible for furniture placement. And yes, the wind does come sweeping o’er the plain, just like in the song. This is Oklahoma, after all, so stability is important.

jlsmith, I’m intrigued by your idea. What I have not yet visualized is how to stabilize the posts as they will have to be anchored into the existing concrete somehow. I need something solid at their tops to hold them in place. If you are a Sketchup wiz, your assistance would be very helpful to me.

-- Beth, Oklahoma, Rambling Road Designs

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a1Jim

115201 posts in 3036 days


#11 posted 11-21-2009 08:48 AM

Beth
I think I would add a 4×6 beam at the house supported by 4×4s up close to the house about as long or longer than the roof line were the door is plus having three 4×4 post about 2 feet in from the out side radius of the patio ,this would form a kind of a open “L” shape towards the out side edge with 4×6 headers forming that L shape. then some 2×6 or 2×8 rafters running from the house towards the outside L were it can cantilever over the L shape up to 2 feet towards the outside edge of the patio and be trimmed to mimic the radius on the patio. These joist would be closer together at the house than towards the out side edge to kind of a fan shape as you look up from the patio. On top of the joist you can place bamboo shade material,2×2 strips running across the joist or a pvc material like Sun Tuff.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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jlsmith5963

297 posts in 2807 days


#12 posted 11-21-2009 10:03 AM

Maybe I am missing something, lets do a visual check. In you mind does the construction of the arbor look something like this?
arbor

If it does I am not sure why you are concerned about attaching it to the slab (if there is strong enough wind to move this thing then you have bigger problems then the arbor moving). But there is nothing stopping you from drilling some holes in the slab and epoxying in some threaded rod that you can use to bolt down typical base connectors that the columns can be attached to, of course you will want to trim out the columns to hide the connectors. So let me know if I don’t understand. (Btw I am an architect)

-- criticism: the art of analyzing and evaluating the quality of an artistic work...

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rrdesigns

526 posts in 2645 days


#13 posted 11-21-2009 11:33 PM

jlsmith5983; If you think weight alone will hold the posts, so much the better for me. I revisited the site today and decided I can get by with five posts on the outside edge, spanned 4’-5’ apart, and positioned to follow the outside curve without cutting it off with too much angle. The upper structure could then be similar to the picture posted above with it being more fan shaped than rectangular.

a1Jim; Unseen in the original photo is another door situated in the corner where the house projects out 6’. This door makes post placement impossible in that area. So your suggestion to place a beam there becomes problematic. That issue poses finding a good way to attach the upper structure to the roof without 1) blocking drainage to the gutters or compromising the integrity of the shingles.

Any more ideas? I’m taking them all in and bringing this together with your help.

-- Beth, Oklahoma, Rambling Road Designs

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a1Jim

115201 posts in 3036 days


#14 posted 11-21-2009 11:49 PM

Hey Beth
Still not a problem just have your post back close to the corner of the house and let the 4×6 cantilever.
With this kind load you can get away with close to 3’ of cantilever. In the last 20 years I’ve built 200 or more patio covers and even more decks. One suggestion was given about connecting the 4×4 post vertical supports to the top of the patio surface, would never fly in my area, our code wants a minimum of 12” x12” X 18” deep around our post.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View pommy's profile

pommy

1697 posts in 3150 days


#15 posted 11-21-2009 11:59 PM

just a silly thought have you ever considered laminating 6mm wpb ply to the thickness you want then rap it in oak or what ever finish you are after…. industrial scale i know but a possibility i have seen this done before they used epoxy to laminate the boards together very strong and looked stunning when finished

-- cut it saw it scrap it SKPE: ANDREW.CARTER69

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