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End grain glue up question

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Forum topic by Shadowrider posted 09-18-2015 12:23 AM 631 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Shadowrider

183 posts in 668 days


09-18-2015 12:23 AM

I’m doing and endgrain to face grain glue up. I’m mixing glue and water 1:1 and applying a couple of coats of that quickly with a brush to the end grain pieces, then a couple of minutes later following it with a heavy coat of glue undiluted and clamping it up. Do you have to leave the pieces clamped longer than doing a normal glue up?

I’m using Titebond III and have been leaving them clamped overnight. It would help my progress if I could go 3 to 4 hours but I don’t want to weaken an already weak joint.


6 replies so far

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TheFridge

5764 posts in 945 days


#1 posted 09-18-2015 12:42 AM

It’ll be fine. I would go with straight glue though. For the whole process.
Edit: thought you were talking about gluing up a cutting board for some reason. I’d be hesitant to do that even if it didn’t any load what so ever. Id at least pocket screw it if no load, or mortise and tenon with load.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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bearkatwood

1194 posts in 471 days


#2 posted 09-18-2015 12:53 AM

What reason would you have to glue end grain to face grain and is there a joinery choice that could help you get long grain to long grain?

-- Brian Noel

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bondogaposis

4020 posts in 1810 days


#3 posted 09-18-2015 12:55 AM

Isn’t there a better joint you could use?

-- Bondo Gaposis

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Shadowrider

183 posts in 668 days


#4 posted 09-18-2015 01:34 AM

The end grain boards are the rails and are 2X6 cedar going to douglas fir 4X4s which are the legs to a table for my big green egg. Can’t really do another joint and I have no way to cut a mortise though cutting the tenons wouldn’t be a problem. I’m using 3 Kreg pocket screws at each joint. When done it will have very little weight bearing load. I’ll tie some hidden braces into the legs that place the weight on the legs. I have 6 legs with a set in the center which I did do a huge half lap joint on, so they’re no problem.

I’m very loosely following this design.


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bearkatwood

1194 posts in 471 days


#5 posted 09-18-2015 12:03 PM

Your comment about the mortises is actually the opposite of the truth. The tricky part as you get into woodworking is the tenons, the mortises are a bit easier and can be done quickly with just a mortise chisel. If you have a forstner bit a little smaller than the mortise, even easier.
Pocket screws can be a valuable addition to the shop and are useful, but I am afraid they will not hold up with the woods you have chosen and the design. They are nice when making some utility cabinet face frames and adding a slat in after construction, but they wear out and become loose over time. I would reinforce the joints with some “L” brackets . That should help keep it from wobbling apart too soon and if it stays in a static state it should last quite a few years.
I don’t want to be a naysayer, I hope your project turns out well. Next time don’t doubt yourself, all you need is a backsaw and a chisel and you can cut a mortise and tenon.

-- Brian Noel

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Shadowrider

183 posts in 668 days


#6 posted 09-18-2015 04:27 PM

@bearkat, I thought about putting in a couple of 1/2” dowels at each joint but don’t have any doweling jigs and little time to make one, the pocket holes are a quick easy crutch. Your comments about the M/T joinery do make sense now that I read them. “L” brackets are an option and shouldn’t cost much of anything, so I’ll add them. As you can see it will be easy to add bracing hidden inside to put largely all the weight onto the 4X4 legs. So like you allude to, it’s just a matter of keeping it together while moving it around. It will be static for the most part. I’ll just be rolling it out about 3 feet from the house on a concrete patio to use it. It’ll have heavy duty polyurethane casters on the bottom.

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