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Would cutting copper damage hand saw teeth?

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Forum topic by ShawnSpencer posted 09-16-2015 04:00 PM 1279 views 0 times favorited 21 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ShawnSpencer

81 posts in 1009 days


09-16-2015 04:00 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question blade

I am planning to use copper rods to dowel some joints. Would the copper damage the teeth of my flush trim saw or power tool blades? I tried some googling but cant find a good answer. Would I be better off finding a junk saw to do this kind of work? Thanks in advance guys.

-- I know you know...


21 replies so far

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jmartel

6576 posts in 1617 days


#1 posted 09-16-2015 04:07 PM

It will probably dull your blades easier, but copper is softer than brass. Brass is cut by woodworking machinery fairly easily. If you have a dremel tool, that’s probably best. Then flush it up with a sander after you are done.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

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WoodNSawdust

1417 posts in 643 days


#2 posted 09-16-2015 04:07 PM

Copper is harder than most people think. I would not risk one of my good saws by trying to cut it. Could you pre-cut the rod to length, finish the end, and then drive it into the joint?

-- "I love it when a plan comes together" John "Hannibal" Smith

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jdh122

879 posts in 2285 days


#3 posted 09-16-2015 04:07 PM

Why not use a hacksaw? You could rub it on a sharpening stone on one side to remove the set.

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests

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daddywoofdawg

1010 posts in 1042 days


#4 posted 09-16-2015 04:36 PM

Hack saw,dremel,metal cutting blade,Cutting blade in a 4.5” angle grinder.

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MrRon

3927 posts in 2710 days


#5 posted 09-16-2015 04:37 PM

Why copper? I never heard of it being used for dowels. If it has to me metal, aluminum would be a better choice; cheaper and cut with woodworking machines.

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daddywoofdawg

1010 posts in 1042 days


#6 posted 09-16-2015 04:38 PM

I think it’s the look.

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bosum3919

338 posts in 1086 days


#7 posted 09-16-2015 05:00 PM

Some times, there may not be enough information to access the problem and this may be one of those cases. IN NO CASE would I EVER use my wood cutting tools on ANY kind of METAL. A hacksaw was design to cut metal and they are not very expensive. Every good shop should have one as they provide solutions to many common house hold problems.

-- Bob

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ShawnSpencer

81 posts in 1009 days


#8 posted 09-16-2015 05:02 PM



It will probably dull your blades easier, but copper is softer than brass. Brass is cut by woodworking machinery fairly easily. If you have a dremel tool, that s probably best. Then flush it up with a sander after you are done.

- jmartel

This is what I was thinking of doing. The copper is just for the look. Trying some new things. I had seen Kyle Toth cut copper sheets on his table saw but, my first impression was that is bad for your blade. Thanks for the input guys.

-- I know you know...

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

14940 posts in 2157 days


#9 posted 09-17-2015 12:01 AM

Copper can be pretty hard if not annealed but the biggest issue is round stock will want to spin and get out of your control in a nanosecond! Use a hacksaw or cutoff wheel.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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waho6o9

7179 posts in 2044 days


#10 posted 09-17-2015 01:31 AM

Hello hacksaw

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TopamaxSurvivor

17676 posts in 3143 days


#11 posted 09-17-2015 01:45 AM

Copper alloys vary in hardness. I have cut aluminum with my table saw. I do not use one of my premium, spendy blades ;-)

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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Rick M

7934 posts in 1847 days


#12 posted 09-17-2015 05:53 AM

I’ve used 1/4” copper rod as pins in woodworking joints, cutting them was no issue at all. Steel is much harder than copper. There are tropical hardwoods that are harder than copper, harder than brass even. One tip, it’s best to flush cut them as close as possible because when you sand, the wood will wear away faster and the copper wants to stand proud by just enough that you can feel it. I kept switching between a file and sandpaper to keep the copper perfectly flush.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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TopamaxSurvivor

17676 posts in 3143 days


#13 posted 09-17-2015 06:01 AM



I ve used 1/4” copper rod as pins in woodworking joints, cutting them was no issue at all. Steel is much harder than copper. There are tropical hardwoods that are harder than copper, harder than brass even. One tip, it s best to flush cut them as close as possible because when you sand, the wood will wear away faster and the copper wants to stand proud by just enough that you can feel it. I kept switching between a file and sandpaper to keep the copper perfectly flush.

- Rick M.

Have you tried using a short pin and sanding down to it? If so, how did that work?

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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LeslieJohn

15 posts in 862 days


#14 posted 09-17-2015 08:26 AM

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ShawnSpencer

81 posts in 1009 days


#15 posted 09-17-2015 12:30 PM


Have you tried using a short pin and sanding down to it? If so, how did that work?

- TopamaxSurvivor

That is a great idea, I also thought of leaving the rods a touch proud and hammering them to kinda mushroom the tops.

-- I know you know...

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