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did i get the right dozuki

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Forum topic by missesalot posted 09-16-2015 11:26 AM 673 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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missesalot

102 posts in 1065 days


09-16-2015 11:26 AM

ordered this saw the other day thinking dovetails, did i get the right one? reason i ask is that i see they sell one that specifically says dovetail dozuki, the description is pretty generic on the one i ordered.
http://www.woodcraft.com/product/155679/razorsaw-dozuki-saw-240mm-no-306-with-replaceable-blade-gyokucho.aspx


9 replies so far

View Kaleb the Swede's profile

Kaleb the Swede

1732 posts in 1436 days


#1 posted 09-16-2015 11:28 AM

Use it. I don’t see any reason why it wouldn’t work. I used almost the same kind for a long time to cut most of the dovetails in work that I did for a good while. I have switched to a western style saw now as it fits better the way I want to saw

-- Just trying to build something beautiful

View bearkatwood's profile

bearkatwood

1214 posts in 478 days


#2 posted 09-16-2015 12:07 PM

First off hello, The saw you bought will work great for dovetails. My sarcastic side wanted to say you can do dovetails with a chainsaw if you are good enough so that saw should be fine. I looked at a few of your posts and see you are just getting started. Do you have a backsaw? The gent style work fine and are usually very inexpensive. They can take a bit to get used to because they have no place to register your hand. I know toll collectors would scream at me for this, but if you get one make a few cuts and get use to it and see where it is comfortable then carve or sand a registration point that fits your hand so every time you pick it up it goes to the same position. It might be a good idea to practice with both types. I am like Kaleb in that I used a Nokogiri style saw for years. Nokogiri is the classification of these saws. I use the style you have a bit, but I use a ryoba more. The ryoba has no back and teeth on both sides of the blade which works well for rip cuts. I then started making my own backsaws and using them more and I really like using them. Have fun with your new toy, I mean tool.

-- Brian Noel

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4036 posts in 1818 days


#3 posted 09-16-2015 12:52 PM

I have that same saw that I use for dovetails all of the time.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View missesalot's profile

missesalot

102 posts in 1065 days


#4 posted 09-16-2015 12:54 PM

thanks gents, i have an older gents saw that i’ve been playing with, unknown quality flea market find. I’m exploring different methods to the madness, the Japanese stuff is intriguing. I also ordered a Ryoba, both should show up today.

View mramseyISU's profile

mramseyISU

419 posts in 1012 days


#5 posted 09-16-2015 02:00 PM

I have one of those. It was a mixed bag for dovetails I think. I cuts great but those teeth are almost too hard and I ended up breaking a few off in some white oak. I use a western saw for dovetails in white oak now and that one on softer stuff.

-- Trust me I'm an engineer.

View exelectrician's profile

exelectrician

2327 posts in 1894 days


#6 posted 09-16-2015 03:12 PM

Don’t let buyer’s remorse get in the way. Start out slow, get into the rhythm of cutting ever so gently on the pull stroke. Soon you will be refining your collection of Japanese saws, and the old push saws will become nice bits of decoration, and a reminder that things change.

-- Love thy neighbour as thyself

View daddywoofdawg's profile

daddywoofdawg

1010 posts in 1042 days


#7 posted 09-16-2015 05:36 PM

” you can do dovetails with a chainsaw if you are good enough” I think they did that on redwood kings.

View missesalot's profile

missesalot

102 posts in 1065 days


#8 posted 09-16-2015 10:31 PM

This thing is awesome. I suck at it but it cuts awesome

View canadianchips's profile

canadianchips

2360 posts in 2464 days


#9 posted 09-16-2015 10:47 PM

The FIRST backsaw I bought was from flea market. Cost $3. It had a twig for a handle wrapped in twine.
After using it and REALIZING how well the back stroke cuts I made a new handle for it. Still using it, couple teeth missing and still cuts well. Didn’t know what I bought at the time, it was a ryoba style, rip teeth one side, fine teeth on other.
I have since bought another one from hardware store. With my employee discount it was $18.

-- "My mission in life - make everyone smile !"

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