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Forum topic by athomas5009 posted 09-15-2015 09:58 PM 1182 views 0 times favorited 33 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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athomas5009

293 posts in 1082 days


09-15-2015 09:58 PM

Topic tags/keywords: tip resource question chisel plane blade sharpening

I’m looking to improve upon my current sharpening system. I currently use scary sharp and get great results but it’s a hassle and takes too long. I hate the paper changes, cleaning rubber cement and paper tears so much that I avoid sharpening to the point that my hand tools are barely functional. I know I could get 2-3 pieces of float glass and leave the paper on until it’s toarched but honestly it still sounds like a hassle.

I want a set up similar to Marc S./WW. So after a cpl days of research I’m leaning towards Shapton Pro’s 15000 & 8000 for polishing and some DMT’s for shaping/honing. For the DMT’s I was leaning towards the Dia Flat 95, Dia sharp fine 600grit and the very very fine 8000 grit. This set up will run me 550$ which I don’t mind provided it will give me great results with about the same time/effort Marc puts in.

Is the Dia flat 95 worth the extra 75$ ? If it wears considerably better and will allow me to flatten my Shaptons and shape my tools without skipping a beat that’s the way I want to go. I was also thinking about the XXcoarse 10” dia sharp but don’t want to invest this kind of money and have to replace it in a cpl years.

Is the 15000 even do anything? I though about getting it because I have no interest in stropping and figured this would give me that insane sharpness when necessary. Thoughts?

Are the grit choices properly spaced? Meaning I would like to be on to the next stone in around 20 strokes. I don’t really want to add another DMT and was hoping this progression would be good or could be tweaked.

Lastly to give you a feel for my work style I’m a hybrid worker I use my chisels and planes throughout the week but I will choose the power tool unless it makes no sense.

-- Sometimes you're flush and sometimes you're bust, and when you're up, it's never as good as it seems, and when you're down, you never think you'll be up again, but life goes on.


33 replies so far

View Pezking7p's profile

Pezking7p

3097 posts in 1117 days


#1 posted 09-15-2015 11:17 PM

I have diasharps in fine, very fine, and very very fine. They are extremely aggressive and you will probably only use the fine for changing the blade somehow, such as adding camber or repairing small chips. I typically re sharpen using about 20 swipes on very fine and 20 swipes on very very fine. This is good for a quick re sharpen but the final finish isn’t quite as nice as the finish I got from 1200 grit, but it’s not a huge difference. Adding a strop would close the gap.

I love this setup. It is very fast, and not super expensive. For as much as I use it, I could have skipped the fine stone. That gets you a whole setup for less than $200 for two stones and a strop.

Ymmv if you do a lot of coarse work such as flattening backs or plane soles or whatever.

-- -Dan

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

7176 posts in 2042 days


#2 posted 09-15-2015 11:17 PM

View athomas5009's profile

athomas5009

293 posts in 1082 days


#3 posted 09-16-2015 12:11 AM

Waho6o9 – I’ve watched the video before and it would be great to have skills of Sellars but he is a woodworking God and I’ve been only doing this fore 2years. I don’t want to waste a month practicing free hand and stropping only to prob suck at it lol. That’s why I figured the ceramic would replace the need for a strop.

-- Sometimes you're flush and sometimes you're bust, and when you're up, it's never as good as it seems, and when you're down, you never think you'll be up again, but life goes on.

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

5765 posts in 951 days


#4 posted 09-16-2015 12:22 AM

I use a piece of granite and do not glue the sheets. I just use a 1/4 sheet of 1500 to re sharpen. Then strop. Then I shave.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View jmartel's profile

jmartel

6574 posts in 1615 days


#5 posted 09-16-2015 12:24 AM

You could always use a honing guide if you don’t want to sharpen freehand. That’s what I do. I’ve got the Veritas mk. II.

http://www.leevalley.com/us/wood/Page.aspx?p=51868&cat=1,43072,43078,51868

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

View Alster's profile

Alster

99 posts in 2679 days


#6 posted 09-16-2015 12:26 AM

You can do a great job with a coarse dia-sharp (not dia-flat, dia-sharp) ($50) and an 800/4000 or 1000/6000 waterstone (another $50). You might not get the mirror polish you would with a 10000 or 15000 grit stone, but it will be as sharp as you’ll ever need for cutting wood.

As a bonus, you can use the dia-sharp to flatten the waterstone.

View athomas5009's profile

athomas5009

293 posts in 1082 days


#7 posted 09-16-2015 04:42 PM

Ok so it sounds like I would be able to cut out the 15000 ceramic and eathier the fine or xxfine. And possible get the dia sharp XXcoarse vs the dia flat version. That would shave close to 200$ off the stone set. Which is exactly why I posted this before ordering them so please keep the suggestions coming.

Oh btw I already have the MKII j

I’m still thinking about the DIa Flat plate though, the extra size and durability intrigue me so I’d love to be from some dia flat users.

-- Sometimes you're flush and sometimes you're bust, and when you're up, it's never as good as it seems, and when you're down, you never think you'll be up again, but life goes on.

View athomas5009's profile

athomas5009

293 posts in 1082 days


#8 posted 09-16-2015 04:47 PM

Lastly I’d love to hear some chisel set suggestions. ATM a set of the new Stanley 750 sockets are at the top of my list. I know Lee Valley, LN and some others are better but I’m only looking to spend 200$ here. So I’d love some suggestions for 200$ and under and from users of the new 750’s.

-- Sometimes you're flush and sometimes you're bust, and when you're up, it's never as good as it seems, and when you're down, you never think you'll be up again, but life goes on.

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

808 posts in 2315 days


#9 posted 09-16-2015 04:55 PM

In my actual career, I’ve sharpened with almost every system devised. After 30 years of sharpening knives, I’ve found that the best results for the effort and mess are ceramic stones. I have a single ceramic stone at MED for sharpening in the kitchen. I currently use Arkansas stones for shop sharpening, because I have them and the work well but the oil is a PITA, and it does make a fairly large mess. When I find the deal & the desire I’ll look for ceramic for the shop, the kitchen stone delivers an excellent edge quick & clean

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

7176 posts in 2042 days


#10 posted 09-16-2015 05:36 PM

http://www.ebay.com/itm/8-PC-JAPANESE-WOOD-WORKING-CHISEL-WOODWORKING-TOOL-SET-/281598130538?hash=item41908e796a

Well balanced, easy to sharpen and has great edge retention a set to consider IMHO.

View brtech's profile

brtech

904 posts in 2388 days


#11 posted 09-16-2015 06:42 PM

The usual recommendation for modest cost chisels is Narex. I have a few of their mortise chisels and they are very nice tools at a very reasonable price. I’m still using an older set of CR-V bench chisels (Freud made or sold them) and they work fine, but don’t keep an edge for very long. Paul Sellars recommends a dirt cheap equivalent of that you can find at Aldis (yes, the grocery store), and I’m sure they have the same issue but are a reasonable chisel at a very attractive price.

I sharpen on a Worksharp 2000, but I got it on a steal that won’t happen again (thanks HD!)

View DrDirt's profile

DrDirt

4169 posts in 3207 days


#12 posted 09-16-2015 06:55 PM

two words

Diamond stones.

No dishing, no flattening, no worries if they are stored below 32F, wont break if you drop one off your bench :-(

they are flat and always ready to go.

then add a leather strop with honing compound/tripoly

-- 'Political correctness is fascism pretending to be manners' ~George Carlin

View Burb's profile

Burb

109 posts in 1835 days


#13 posted 09-16-2015 08:17 PM



two words

Diamond stones.

- DrDirt

OK, so if you were starting from scratch, then what exactly would you go with? I have some beat up chisels an some decent ones. All need some sharpening but a few need a grinding wheel which I have. I have thought about going with diamond stones, but I’m too unsure to pull the plug…

-- I aspire to be a novice woodworker...

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

808 posts in 2315 days


#14 posted 09-16-2015 08:20 PM

Fair enough DrDirt… but GAWDS they are so expensive!

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

View JayT's profile

JayT

4785 posts in 1676 days


#15 posted 09-16-2015 08:50 PM

I’ve got EZE Lap diamond plates. Coarse, medium and super fine, followed by a strop. Initial cost is a little higher, but not as bad as some would think—less than $200 for the three plates. The advantages made it totally worth the investment for me.

-- "Good judgement is the result of experience. A lot of experience is the result of poor judgement."

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