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I need to dado 1/4" deep by 1/4" wide in-situ, but how?

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Forum topic by SlimPickins posted 09-15-2015 12:35 PM 657 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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SlimPickins

121 posts in 1381 days


09-15-2015 12:35 PM

I am now in the last stage of my gate project – I am fitting the angle irons to the main gate. I need to cut 8 little grooves for the angle iron to fit more flush against some steel brackets but I don’t want to unscrew the wood and take it to my table saw. I started the grooves with a hacksaw just to sort of mark them but the handle of the hacksaw kind of gets in the way while I’m cutting.

I could take the blade of the hacksaw off and handsaw these but the straps are white oak – kind of tough sawing.

I’ll keep thinking of a way and I’m not to worried about this but I just thought I’d ask someone if they can think of a tool/process other than just back and forth with a hacksaw held in my fingers.

I just have to make a groove for the angle iron to be decoupled from the white oak braces – I don’t want the angle iron to touch the white oak braces – the fence-frame is a separate piece in a sense – all internally screwed/welded together that simply bolts to the back of the gate. It looks nice so far – I just need to get the chainlink mounted permanently.

Well, anyway, I’ve only been thinking on this for about 5 minutes so I’m not really deep into this yet.

Any ideas for how to dado standing on my feet would be appreciated. If I have to, I can lay the gate down flat on the ground and bend over it to do the cuts. That might help a lot! Once on the ground I can just set my circular saw to a shallow cut as long as I can get the depth uniform over the few inches in length i have to go. Well, laying it down on the ground should make this easier.

-- If a bug can't eat it, it isn't good wood


14 replies so far

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

7179 posts in 2044 days


#1 posted 09-15-2015 01:39 PM

Router plane and chisel.

And or a hand held router with a cord.

View Richard H's profile

Richard H

489 posts in 1148 days


#2 posted 09-15-2015 01:44 PM

Just a chisel is how I would do it. A router plane would make it nice and flat at the bottom but you can it with just a chisel as well.

View SlimPickins's profile

SlimPickins

121 posts in 1381 days


#3 posted 09-15-2015 01:47 PM

LOL – I just went outside and tried a handsaw – too tough but it worked a little. Then I came in and thought of the chisel just before I looked at this thread. At least I’m on the same wavelength as everyone else.

I’ll tell you why I don’t use a router – I’m just not good with routers other than to do those shelf brackets that fit over a screw. I can handle that on my drillpress. But mostly, I ruin wood with router bits – I need to study that technique.

I also ruin wood when I use a pilot drill bit.

So a chisel it will be! I have plenty of chisels.

-- If a bug can't eat it, it isn't good wood

View Daruc's profile

Daruc

459 posts in 600 days


#4 posted 09-15-2015 01:49 PM

Multi tool?

-- -

View SirIrb's profile

SirIrb

1239 posts in 698 days


#5 posted 09-15-2015 02:48 PM

well trained termites?

Chisel.

-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

View SlimPickins's profile

SlimPickins

121 posts in 1381 days


#6 posted 09-15-2015 04:08 PM

Definitely termites – they’re much faster than worms.

Actually, I just installed the first angle iron – the chiseling went smoothly. So I have 1 of 4 angle irons installed. I only have 2 of them so I can only do one more today as I have to buy the other 2. The hardest part about this job was finding my drillbox with a 3/16” drillbit for the holes in the steel for the screws. It took 20 minutes to find my drillbox.

The rest of the irons should go faster.

-- If a bug can't eat it, it isn't good wood

View DrDirt's profile

DrDirt

4169 posts in 3209 days


#7 posted 09-15-2015 04:12 PM

Any way a biscuit jointer could get in there?

Picture would help us see the issue…..

-- 'Political correctness is fascism pretending to be manners' ~George Carlin

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SlimPickins

121 posts in 1381 days


#8 posted 09-15-2015 04:35 PM

Wuzzat, it come with a free bagel-splittter?

-- If a bug can't eat it, it isn't good wood

View MrFid's profile

MrFid

805 posts in 1371 days


#9 posted 09-15-2015 04:38 PM

I’d use a small router if you have one. Hard to know if that’s possible in your situation.

-- Bailey F - Eastern Mass.

View SlimPickins's profile

SlimPickins

121 posts in 1381 days


#10 posted 09-15-2015 04:47 PM

The biscuit jointer gives a crescent shape to the hole whereas I needed a hole with the same depth along it’s length. Now that I’ve eaten some lunch, I’ve got Round 2 of this 4 round fight. Rocky Marciano against Floyd Meriweather – uh-oh!

-- If a bug can't eat it, it isn't good wood

View DrDirt's profile

DrDirt

4169 posts in 3209 days


#11 posted 09-15-2015 04:58 PM



The biscuit jointer gives a crescent shape to the hole whereas I needed a hole with the same depth along it s length. Now that I ve eaten some lunch, I ve got Round 2 of this 4 round fight. Rocky Marciano against Floyd Meriweather – uh-oh!

- SlimPickins


ah – I thought you were needing to remove wood at just a few small spots – where maybe the slot shape wouldn’t impact you to get the metal to sit flush.

Good luck.

-- 'Political correctness is fascism pretending to be manners' ~George Carlin

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SlimPickins

121 posts in 1381 days


#12 posted 09-15-2015 05:01 PM


I d use a small router if you have one. Hard to know if that s possible in your situation.

- MrFid

I have router bits, but no dedicated tool that can hand-route something other than a drill and I just don’t trust my hands.

But at least now I have a procedure:
1) Lay the angle iron in place.
2) Using the chisel upside down, chisel top and bottom of the groove to delineate the groove’s edges.
3) Turn the chisel at an angle (about 10 degree or so) to the lines and deepen them by using a longitudinal
chiseling action.
4) Now use chisel 90 degrees to step 3) and take stuff out working left to right along the line (chiseling top to bottom, and bottom to top). Then take the narrow chisel (1/4” wide or so), and work left to right to clean things up – this can be done with the hammer or just with the hand. This makes things clean up nicely was we go along at this step.
5) Repeat this if you need more depth by chiseling straight (chisel right-side up) in to deepen the cut at the edges.
6) Test fit the angle iron to make sure it’s flush up against the steel bracket. If not, deepen the groove the wee bit that you’re off.
7) When you get to a tough shard, just relax and be patient and chisel it gradually – there are usually one or two of these dense shards of oak per groove.

The grooves the above process makes are nearly perfect dados, but I admit it takes an hour for each 2 of them. Perhaps I can do the next 2 in a half hour.

-- If a bug can't eat it, it isn't good wood

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

7179 posts in 2044 days


#13 posted 09-15-2015 05:06 PM

Sharpen the chisel a long the way and you’ll be done in no time.

View SlimPickins's profile

SlimPickins

121 posts in 1381 days


#14 posted 09-15-2015 06:19 PM


I d use a small router if you have one. Hard to know if that s possible in your situation.

- MrFid

I have router bits, but no dedicated tool that can hand-route something other than a drill and I just don t trust my hands.

But at least now I have a procedure:
1) Lay the angle iron in place.
2) Using the chisel upside down, chisel top and bottom of the groove to delineate the groove s edges.
3) Turn the chisel at an angle (about 10 degree or so) to the lines and deepen them by using a longitudinal
chiseling action.
4) Now use chisel 90 degrees to step 3) and take stuff out working left to right along the line (chiseling top to bottom, and bottom to top). Then take the narrow chisel (1/4” wide or so), and work left to right to clean things up – this can be done with the hammer or just with the hand. This makes things clean up nicely was we go along at this step.
5) Repeat this if you need more depth by chiseling straight (chisel right-side up) in to deepen the cut at the edges.
6) Test fit the angle iron to make sure it s flush up against the steel bracket. If not, deepen the groove the wee bit that you re off.
7) When you get to a tough shard, just relax and be patient and chisel it gradually – there are usually one or two of these dense shards of oak per groove.

The grooves the above process makes are nearly perfect dados, but I admit it takes an hour for each 2 of them. Perhaps I can do the next 2 in a half hour.

- SlimPickins

To the above 7 steps I need to add one more.

After I shallow angle the lines at 10 degrees to deepen them, I then deepen them fuirther by putting the chiisel up at an angle of about 87 degrees thereabouts and I hit the chisel slightly right of center. By doing this, the chisel automatically walks along the line, but I also get a deeper cut than the shallow angle cuts. It went a little faster.

So now I have two angle irons installed – just need to buy 2 more and repeat all this.

Yeah, I will have time to take the chisels down to my bench grinder and make them really razor sharp. That would get my time down below 15 minutes per groove – to like 10 minutes or better. So it took me an hour to do the 2nd angle iron, groove-cutting, drilling holes and screwing the angle iron in, and even sweeping up for the day and putting the tools away, and closing up shop completely. I hurt my back some more playing footballl last night so I need a sciatica break. LOL

-- If a bug can't eat it, it isn't good wood

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