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Help with new (very old) lathe, please

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Forum topic by scotchleaf posted 09-14-2015 12:54 PM 674 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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scotchleaf

9 posts in 1204 days


09-14-2015 12:54 PM

Topic tags/keywords: lathe refurbishing

I’m working on refurbishing an old lathe. The good news was that the price was right (free). Does anyone know where to get a manual for a Dankey brand lathe made in taiwan? Has anyone heard of that brand?

I’ve been having fun with electrolytic rust removal, so the removable parts of the machine are looking a whole lot better.

Anyway, here are my total novice questions:

A. the lathe has some parts that I’m not sure of: what is the arm marked “1” for?

B. Also, if you look at the part marked “3”, what is that? It looks like the lathe is missing a part that would connect the wheel to the base of the arm, where the “2” is.

C. Finally (for now) the headstock (“A” below) is rusted in place. Any suggestions on how to remove it? The main problem is that, when I apply force to “A”, “B” also turns, and I can’t hold it tightly enough to get “A” off the lathe.


13 replies so far

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

826 posts in 1194 days


#1 posted 09-14-2015 01:28 PM

Scotch, send this thread over to the woodturning forum. There are a couple guys that know their stuff.

What it all looks like to me is the lathe is a strange one. The thing you noted as #1 looks like it is a tool holder for either cutting straight spindles or cutting across the face of whatever is between centers. It looks like the tailstock is missing, so you will be restricted to using the face plate until you can get one to fit. If you are trying to remove the spur, if you lathe spindle is hollow, use a knockout bar to remove it from the outboard side. It the spindle is solid, use a long enough wrench on the spindle to reach the ways lock the spindle from rotating. Use another wrench on the spur and pull the wrench towards you to loosen and remove it. Other than giving out that bit of valuable information, I am drained.

What program did you use to post the pictures? They come if a little over a half picture. I right click and click again on view image. I then get the full picture….... ........... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson)

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scotchleaf

9 posts in 1204 days


#2 posted 09-15-2015 01:46 AM

Jerry: woodturning forum on lumberjocks? or a different site?

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

5765 posts in 951 days


#3 posted 09-15-2015 02:03 AM

On LJs. Most Spurs and centers I’ve seen are tapered as the above poster said. So the headstock is hollow and you just tap it out with a bar. I might spray some PB blaster on it just to be safe.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

7922 posts in 1845 days


#4 posted 09-15-2015 04:34 AM

1, looks like a tool holder. 2, is a hand wheel. 3, is a cover for something; screw? Maybe part of a copy system.

Most spurs are Morse tapers, but they can be threaded. If they are tapered, the spindle will be hollow so you can insert a metal rod and drive the spur out. Wrap the spur in a rag because it will shoot across the room when it gives. If it has seized and can’t be driven out you’ll need a shop with a hydraulic press to remove it, that’s what I had to do on one of my old lathes.

when I apply force to “A”, “B” also turns, and I can’t hold it tightly enough to get “A” off the lathe.

A and B are opposite ends of the spindle, you can’t turn one without turning the other. I would put a wrench on the spindle (A) and a wrench on the spur center and try to break it loose. To remove the spindle, you probably remove the pulleys (look for set screws) and maybe drive the spindle out. It’s probably held by bearings, maybe something else, better pics would help. Sometimes you have to take parts off until you can’t anymore then go from there.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Bluepine38's profile

Bluepine38

3341 posts in 2550 days


#5 posted 09-15-2015 05:23 PM

It looks like you have a small metal working lathe. Once the rust is cleaned off, the arm #1 would be
moved along the bed by rotating the handle marked #2 that would turn an acme type thread located
under the piece of metal marked #3. The arm #1 has a square shaft sticking out with holes in the end
for holding carbide cutters and the shaft would move towards and away from the piece that would be
fastened to the faceplate, or between the live and dead center. Hope this will help you, but it does
look like some important pieces are missing, but from the looks of it, you might have a motor on it. If
you could put a picture of the entire lathe up, it might help.

-- As ever, Gus-the 77 yr young apprentice carpenter

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

7922 posts in 1845 days


#6 posted 09-15-2015 06:04 PM

Lead screw on the backside? That seems weird.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

7482 posts in 1471 days


#7 posted 09-15-2015 09:50 PM



Lead screw on the backside? That seems weird.

- Rick M.

The whole arm may be put in backwards. The sliding bar on top of that arm might be a tool holder if it is (or was) a metal lathe.

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4226 posts in 1663 days


#8 posted 09-15-2015 09:57 PM

With the spur center and faceplate shown, it’s been used for wood, not metal. A better picture of the lathe would help a lot. That arm/holder thing might be part of a duplicator. Just a guess.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View scotchleaf's profile

scotchleaf

9 posts in 1204 days


#9 posted 09-17-2015 03:42 AM

Sorry, here is a better photo

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

7922 posts in 1845 days


#10 posted 09-17-2015 05:28 AM

How is the electrolysis going? Any luck on the spur?

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View scotchleaf's profile

scotchleaf

9 posts in 1204 days


#11 posted 09-17-2015 04:57 PM

I really appreciate you guys! Thanks very much. I’ve managed to de-rust and paint some parts…

This sander appears to be inflatable…?

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scotchleaf

9 posts in 1204 days


#12 posted 09-17-2015 04:59 PM

I still have no idea how the “arm” worked, or what the small green channel to the side did… here is one end of it…

View Bluepine38's profile

Bluepine38

3341 posts in 2550 days


#13 posted 09-17-2015 05:10 PM

Dankey International Inc. was established in 1979 and had 12 employees
http://business.com.tw/com/com.asp?id=gkq1csr7ih11gwm
Here is the little information I could find on them. Does not look like a good scource for information, but
you could try.
The normal way that sandilng discs were fastened to the outboard side of a lathe was with left hand threads.
Looks like you have quite an unusual collection of ideas for a wood/metal turning lathe combined in that
machine. You will have to unthread that sanding disc from the spindle before you can attempt to knock
the spur out of the inboard end of the headstock spindle, if this is put together like a regular lathe.
Looking good so far.

-- As ever, Gus-the 77 yr young apprentice carpenter

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