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Dunlop lathe motor question

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Forum topic by Combo Prof posted 09-12-2015 10:24 PM 648 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Combo Prof

2375 posts in 739 days


09-12-2015 10:24 PM

Topic tags/keywords: lathe question

I have a vintage Dunlop lathe I have not used for 10 years. I thought I fire it up and turn some tool handles, but the motor I have for does not seem to work. The manual calls for a 1725 RPM motor but does not specify the horse power. What horse power should I get? (Speed is controlled with a 4 step pulley system.) Also, where should I buy one?

-- Don K, (Houghton, Michigan)


12 replies so far

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4216 posts in 1661 days


#1 posted 09-12-2015 10:32 PM

Why don’t you try and fix the existing motor? Usually it’s something really simple like a fried capacitor or sawdust stuck in the centrifugal switch contacts. If you are looking to just replace it, look on the existing motor nameplate for what HP it is.. don’t know what lathe you have, but typically 1/2HP or thereabouts will work for most vintage stuff. Available from lots of sources… just make sure the rpm and shaft size are the same and that it rotates (or can be reversed) in the proper direction.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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TheFridge

5765 posts in 948 days


#2 posted 09-12-2015 10:54 PM

Yep

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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Combo Prof

2375 posts in 739 days


#3 posted 09-12-2015 11:24 PM

O.K. I’ll look more carefully at the motor. The capacitor was flopping around maybe its disconnected. I’m sure it was not the original motor. Looks like an old washing machine motor to me. But the answer to your question is I really don’t know a lot about electrical motors. But my friend Mr. Google does, so I can probably figure it out.

-- Don K, (Houghton, Michigan)

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MrUnix

4216 posts in 1661 days


#4 posted 09-12-2015 11:38 PM

Post a picture of the motor and let us know what model lathe it is.

Quick diagnosis – What did the motor do when you turned it on? Did it make any noise (like a hum) or make any other signs of life.

Cheers,
Brad

PS: That capacitor can be tested easily with a cheap multimeter; even one of those free 7 function ones you can get at HF with a coupon.

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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Combo Prof

2375 posts in 739 days


#5 posted 09-12-2015 11:49 PM


Post a picture of the motor and let us know what model lathe it is.

Quick diagnosis – What did the motor do when you turned it on? Did it make any noise (like a hum) or make any other signs of life.

Cheers,
Brad

PS: That capacitor can be tested easily with a cheap multimeter; even one of those free 7 function ones you can get at HF with a coupon.

- MrUnix


OK. I’ll do that. And cool I have a cheap multimeter. I have to go out now, so I ‘ll get back to this later.

-- Don K, (Houghton, Michigan)

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Combo Prof

2375 posts in 739 days


#6 posted 09-13-2015 02:49 PM

Al right I got the motor to work now. But I have more questions.

I can’t find the model number anywhere but it looks to me from looking at vintage machinery pictures to be a: 1942/3 Dunlap 9-inch wood-turning lathe, Probably model 101.06242

Here are some pictures and then my new question.

My new question: is what is that big separate lump attached to the right on the floor?
Can I just remove it?

Other question is what else should I do to get this up and running?

-- Don K, (Houghton, Michigan)

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

5765 posts in 948 days


#7 posted 09-13-2015 03:09 PM

Don k, I’ve never seen anything like that. If you could pull the top off and get us some pics of the inside, then we can try to figure out what the hell that thing is.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4216 posts in 1661 days


#8 posted 09-13-2015 03:18 PM


[...]

My new question: is what is that big separate lump attached to the right on the floor?
Can I just remove it?

Other question is what else should I do to get this up and running?
- Combo Prof

Wow.. what a mess! i’m not sure, but the ‘lump’ looks like a switch controlled solenoid maybe? I’m guessing that the switch can’t handle the full amperage of the motor, so it powers the solenoid instead, which in turn makes/breaks the contacts to run the motor. If you want to get rid of it, you will most likely need to replace the switch with one that could handle the motor current.

I’d rip all that wiring out to start with… it’s old and looks like an accident waiting to happen. Lots of ways you could go with re-wiring it. I’d probably go with a magnetic paddle switch (and get rid of the solenoid), which gives you the extra safety of not powering back up after a power fail.

If you need it ASAP for a project… you could do a temporary fix by just wiring the motor up with a new cord and ditching all the rest of the wiring. You would have to plug it in to run, and un-plug to stop, but at least it would get it working quickly. After you finish the project, you could then wire it up properly.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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Combo Prof

2375 posts in 739 days


#9 posted 09-13-2015 04:13 PM

I’ll take the lump apart and post photos of the inside around 1pm EST. I have to go deliver a rack of Kayaks for the 4-H float trip now. Whats a magnetic paddle switch? Can I get one from True Value Hardware?

-- Don K, (Houghton, Michigan)

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Combo Prof

2375 posts in 739 days


#10 posted 09-13-2015 08:24 PM

O.K. I got the lump apart. Sorry for the delay. Here are the photos:

Outside contacts

Inside guts

So does it need to be there or not?
Whats the recommendation? Still the same get a magnetic paddle switch. which I guess is of these.

Where is the best place to order one? I doubt I can get one in town.

What is the danger of just using a single pole light switch.

-- Don K, (Houghton, Michigan)

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

7910 posts in 1842 days


#11 posted 09-14-2015 07:20 AM

No idea about the lump. But I’d bet my bottom dollar that’s the original motor. 1/4hp would have been standard.

Don’t even ask about switches, you’ll get so much conflicting advice you won’t know what to do. I won’t tell you what to do but I use regular old light switches and so do many others.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Combo Prof

2375 posts in 739 days


#12 posted 09-14-2015 11:11 AM

I have put on a regular light switch and removed the lump which probably is a switch controlled solenoid or something as Brad suggests. its working now. I just have to attach it to the lathe. Building a hinged tensioning board to put the motor on. The old weight of the motor on the hinged board keeps the belt tight on the pulleys trick.
Is there a better way?

The wiring from the motor to the lump is fine but short so I’ll replace it today. The wring from the plug to the switch is also fine. The wiring from the lump was old house wiring and will be tossed.

Nice to know the 1/4 HP, 5 amp, 1725 motor is probably original. (I dug two motors out of the basement I had stored with/near the lathe, the other with the floppy capacitor was 3450 RPM so I discarded it as the one to use.)

I presume from what I’ve read is that the paddle magnetic switch is just for safety, but not functionally necessary. Still I’ll order one. Wish I had a local supplier.

Meanwhile I’ll just use a light switch.

-- Don K, (Houghton, Michigan)

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