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Freshly milled logs

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Forum topic by IAMike posted 09-12-2015 06:00 PM 656 views 0 times favorited 4 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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IAMike

24 posts in 949 days


09-12-2015 06:00 PM

I’ll be milling some ash today, after its cut, can I stack it inside a garage or basement, it would it give off enough moisture where that could be a problem? All the how-to advice I see says to stack out outside for some months better moving it inside. I was wondering if that was the reason why. Garages are unheated and un-vented, basement in question is bare concrete floor with finished walls.

-- I'm thinking about starting a blog for my projects. It'll have to be called Woodworking By Dummies


4 replies so far

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RogerM

760 posts in 1861 days


#1 posted 09-12-2015 08:04 PM

I dry my freshly milled lumber in the upper elevations of my shop (10 ft. ceilings) which has a heat pump and a wood stove in it. This arrangement works well for me.

-- Roger M, Aiken, SC

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Andre

1022 posts in 1268 days


#2 posted 09-12-2015 08:48 PM

Do you have some end seal? Depending on humidity, could get a lot of checking. Sealed my fresh cut Birch 3 times and the end that got some afternoon sun still checked, should of tarp it I guess. When the wood dries too fast it will split crack real bad and real fast! Lost a real nice Tamarack log last year.

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View HerbC's profile

HerbC

1592 posts in 2322 days


#3 posted 09-12-2015 10:09 PM

Putting freshly milled lumber inside to “dry” is inviting a major problem with mold and mildew because usually there is not enough ventilation to carry away the moisture quickly enough and the end result is very likely to be nasty.

Find a level spot outside with plenty of ventilation to allow the moisture to carry away. Build a solid and level base to use to stack the lumber. Use dry “stickers” (typically 1×1 or 3/4×3/4 sticks, cut from dry, not “green” lumber) to maintain spaces between the layers of green lumber. Use the correct number of spacers for the length of the lumber (one near (with 2”) of each end and otherwise 24” spacing maximum) and try to keep the stickers lined up vertically to minimize warping the lumber during drying. Use something (old metal roofing, old plywood, etc) to cover the top of the stack(s) to protect them from direct rain. Do NOT use a tarp or plastic sheeting as they will trap moisture and slow the drying.

Lastly, keep any eye out for powder post beetles. I hear they love ash…

Good Luck and

Be Careful!

Herb

-- Herb, Florida - Here's why I close most messages with "Be Careful!" http://lumberjocks.com/HerbC/blog/17090

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IAMike

24 posts in 949 days


#4 posted 09-12-2015 11:10 PM

I used anchorseal on the ends of the logs when they were cut down a few weeks ago, no checking to speak of.


Do you have some end seal? Depending on humidity, could get a lot of checking. Sealed my fresh cut Birch 3 times and the end that got some afternoon sun still checked, should of tarp it I guess. When the wood dries too fast it will split crack real bad and real fast! Lost a real nice Tamarack log last year.

- Andre


-- I'm thinking about starting a blog for my projects. It'll have to be called Woodworking By Dummies

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