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Forum topic by JDCrae posted 09-12-2015 11:57 AM 698 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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JDCrae

29 posts in 646 days


09-12-2015 11:57 AM

Good Morning All,

I am wanting to build an elevated dog feeder with storage underneath. I am not wanting to do anything crazy. Am thinking basic ideas here.

In my mind I am imagining 1.5×1.5 frames- dado’d to accept some luan to give it that raised panel look, but much more simply. Joinery would all be pocket hole and glue, based would be a ply that would fit inside the 1.5×1.5 frame.

Inside this box I am buliding would be a large plastic tote wiith airtight seal. This will house the food.

So the top is where I am hoping for some group brainstorming. I need the top to move out of the way in some fashion so you can get to the dog food to refill the bowl at meal times.

1. The top must move so that neither bowl must be removed.

2. Top must be one piece so that water splashes from the water bowl don’t go anywhere.

3. It can slide to the right or back toward the user, but cannot slide forward for left, as there are walls in those directions.

So my first idea was using drawer slides to make this happen. Would have them so the whole top slides to the right to access the food, and slide back when I am done. This is a possibility, but I have never installed drawer slides, and am apprehensive to how strong they are, alignment issues etc. Open to it, would just like more input if I am going to go that route.

Second idea was using Stumpy Nubs sliding method he used on his end table. T tracks running the width of the feeder top, rabbet the edges of the top so that it slides easily out of the way. I love this idea for its simplicity, but don’t see how I can do this and keep the top supported when in the open position.

A last issue. The bowls will be placed in the top via holes cut, so in that sense they are counter sunk. Is it better to do a flap down on the slide out of the feeder so the bowls don’t hit the side or front? I can’t really raise the top as my dog is only so tall. Don’t want him stretching to eat here.

Any and all suggestions and input appreciated! Trying to keep this as a budget and uncomplicated as possible project. Will be painted, so not worried about wood per se.

Thanks Again!

Jeff


9 replies so far

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ChefHDAN

805 posts in 2309 days


#1 posted 09-12-2015 06:43 PM

JD, just recently threw out a wooden bowl stand for the dog dishes, I don’t know what breed you’re feeding but rottie’s are sloppy drinkers and the water just tore up the top with swelling. Granted I didn’t build the unit, and I don’t know what finish was used in the third world that it was made in, but for your project, be sure to spend the time with many coats of poly to all surfaces to protect your work.

Undermount slides will run $50 to $60 for a pair, but I think you could build a box sliding in a box with the bottom well waxed or some UHMW strips at the bottom to reduce any friction, I don’t think the box could be big enough to hold more than 20# or so.

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

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JDCrae

29 posts in 646 days


#2 posted 09-12-2015 07:22 PM

I appreciate the advice. I like your design. There is a company that makes them on Etsy, but I simply cannot bring myself to spend over 100 on one, when there would not be much in materials.

I was thinking about the box in box style, but would really like to have something that can house at least 30 pounds of dog food. Hate to have to find another place to store the rest of the food. I suppose I could make it a double drawer stand with one drawer sliding back toward me, and the other sliding out to the right. Size wise the bracing to do that might make the size too big, I know what you mean as far as the top goes. If fully intend on using bar top finish on the entire thing.

Guess I need to brainstorm some more.

JD

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ChefHDAN

805 posts in 2309 days


#3 posted 09-12-2015 10:11 PM

Maybe something like this, storage behind & a flip up top. Depending on your sizing and the bag of food, you might be able to slide the bag into the box, which would help to keep the storage space neat?

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

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JDCrae

29 posts in 646 days


#4 posted 09-14-2015 11:26 AM

Thanks for the second sketch. That design is definitely doable. When I get home tonight I will take some measurements to make sure I have the necessary room. It is a bit of an odd wall that I am wanting to put this next to. Cannot thank you enough for your input. Needed a fresh brain thinking about this.

One question I had, is there any wood species, that could be used on its own to line a dry food storage cabinet? While the plastic tote insert idea sounds good, it also limits the shape and size of the total project. LIke you said, if I make one that is the same size of the bag, that would solve that.

JD

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ChefHDAN

805 posts in 2309 days


#5 posted 09-15-2015 08:34 PM

Any wood would work, for this I’d lean towards using a plywood maybe 5/8 and use an oil based poly for at least 3 coats. You could still build the frames, but pocket holes and edgbanding would make a quick job of it. Thought for the storage, you could just cut the top off of the bag and slide the bag down into the taller box. Most of the feeds I’ve bought over the years have a heavily waxed or polymerized bag and that could keep fats/oils from getting into contact with the wood in the first place

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

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JDCrae

29 posts in 646 days


#6 posted 09-28-2015 04:38 PM

I cannot thank you enough for all the help. Had some delays due to family members being sick, etc and also brought some new tools in the shop, that required a complete reorganize, but am hoping to start cracking on this, this upcoming weekend. Going to stop by the store to get a measurement for how thick the bags typically are.

On a separate note, did you use Sketch Up for this? Downloaded it this morning, and have been messing around with it, but for the life of me, cannot figure out how to change any shape to a specific dimension. all the tutorials on youtube are of an older version apparently, so they are not very helpful, and even the newer ones on sketchup’s own site, indicate being able to click on the dimensions window and manually enter the dimension I want. Think this program will be hugely helpful in the longrun, but initial startup is rockier than I thought it would be

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AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1768 days


#7 posted 09-28-2015 05:00 PM

No drawer hardware to buy with this one.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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HokieKen

1735 posts in 598 days


#8 posted 09-28-2015 08:26 PM

I was gonna suggest 2 doors in the front, like a cabinet. But AlaskaGuy’s picture is even simpler. Is there some reason the top has to move? If so, make the top and the right end a single piece and put it on drawer slides. That way, the end will support the top when it’s slid out.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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ChefHDAN

805 posts in 2309 days


#9 posted 09-28-2015 09:17 PM

JD- yes it was SU, as for dimensions, the program is intuitive for adding the dimensions and you don’t need to click the window
1- click draw square place pencil at starting point begin to draw then just start typing 2,2 will yield a 2”x2” square, 4,8 will yield a 4”x8” rectangle etc, (orientation of rec will decide which # is first)
2- click push pull icon select face of square or rectangle begin pull type 18 and enter your square or rec is now 18 inches tall

It does take a bit of practice to learn the tools and the lingo to be able to Google a question but I’ve found it very helpful, check out Woodgear's tutorials they are a good starting point.

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

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