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Forum topic by poopiekat posted 11-17-2009 03:07 AM 1092 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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poopiekat

4224 posts in 3197 days


11-17-2009 03:07 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question

I’ve been experimenting with red sharpening rouge on a buffing wheel for getting a better edge than honing on a stone. I just bought a assortment of rouges, different colors/different grits, but I’m hesitant to start using them. I’m not sure if I should be using a dedicated buffing wheel for each grit. Seems to me that once a certain grit is used on a wheel, that wheel cannot be ever used for a finer grit. Need I buy a separate wheel for each grit? Are multiple grits really necessary?

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!


12 replies so far

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poopiekat

4224 posts in 3197 days


#1 posted 11-17-2009 03:26 AM

Ooopps, I edited out that important detail! Lathe tools and hand plane cutters, mostly. At the moment I’m doing the plough cutters for my 45 and 55 Stanleys. Thx, GW!

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

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TopamaxSurvivor

17667 posts in 3138 days


#2 posted 11-17-2009 04:58 AM

You’d definitely have to clean all of the rouge out to go finer. Using them on a leather strop is probably a better way to go than on a wheel.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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poopiekat

4224 posts in 3197 days


#3 posted 11-18-2009 01:27 AM

Thanks, Topamax!
One further question, if I may….
I’ve wondered about leather strops… and the question is whether people are generally using ONE grit for all honing, or if progressively finer grits are used, and again, whether a different strop is used for each grit. Thanks for the advice about strops! I’ll try one! I did just buy a really good 6” felt wheel from Lee Valley, but I’ll try a strop. I’ve heard of using everything from cardboard, mdf, felt pads and other things as a substrate for the compounds, but I really want to get to scary-sharp capabilities! Thx again!

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

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MedicKen

1610 posts in 2924 days


#4 posted 11-18-2009 01:42 AM

I would think that if you use a buffing wheel and compound you will have a very high probability of rounding over the edge. Not what you want to happen. I agree with Topamax on the leather strop. The other option is a block of hardwood, 2” maple or walnut for example, and diamond paste.

-- My job is to give my kids things to discuss with their therapist....medic20447@gmail.com

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reggiek

2240 posts in 2732 days


#5 posted 11-18-2009 02:09 AM

Leather strops recommended as there is silica in the animal skins that enhances the polishing action of the abrasive. You can get great stropping leather at most hobby stores that sell latigo leather to be used in making leather goods…..I got a great 16” square piece at Michaels for $5.00 in one of their bargain boxes….Also a friend of mine recommends that you go to goodwill or just to a thrift store and buy rough leather (non dyed)belts…you can get them for a song….and as long as they are not dyed….they will work very good as a strop.

For my turning tools, I use a diamond hone to get the edge sharpened (I have a course, medium and fine – and a round one for getting the insides of gouges)....then to the strop to polish the edge so that it willl hold up better and slice smoother (I use diamond paste compound on the strops too)......I will only use the grinder when the tool has been damaged – knotched or chipped – or when I am putting the first bevel on it…

-- Woodworking.....My small slice of heaven!

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poopiekat

4224 posts in 3197 days


#6 posted 11-18-2009 02:49 AM

MedicKen: Hmm, okay, I’ll save the felt wheel for burnishing and polishing. Diamond paste? I’ll give it a try!
I just couldn’t get to where I felt I was getting the results I wanted from my Arkansas stone, like as if I was only getting my edges halfway as good as I wanted them to be. ReggieK: Hmm, I’ll try Michael’s, I didn’t know they sold leather! I’ll go hunt for some stropping videos, do you mount your leathers to a subsurface like wood, or tether both ends like in the old barber shops? Interesting too about not using grinding wheels unless repairing chips, thanks for the insight!

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

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TopamaxSurvivor

17667 posts in 3138 days


#7 posted 11-18-2009 03:06 AM

I have only used red jewelers rouge on mine. It is a piece of leather about 1 1/2×6 or 8 mounted on a piece of wood. You can put waves and rounded edges on with a polishing wheel. You see that a lot in gun barrel reblue jobs.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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reggiek

2240 posts in 2732 days


#8 posted 11-18-2009 03:22 AM

It depends on what you are stropping as to what base to use. I have strop on a wood block to use for skews and straight edged tools and a strop strap cliped to the side of my bench to use on gouges and v tools. I also have a few pieces of leather wrapped around a wooden shim to get to the inside of small gouges and v tools. Once I found that I didn’t need to pay the outrageous price for stropping leather that I found online…..I made a bunch of them….and I have been experimenting with different compounds to see which works best of the different types of tool metals…...

With the turning tools though….diamond sharpening works the best….I get very sharp tools and I dont take away so much metal…...I was finding that the grinder would take a lot of material off the tools very quickly…yet I would still not be that happy with the edge…so I was back to honing…and stropping with stones. I had a good friend show me how he sharpens with the diamond hones (and a basic diamond chef’s sharpener) and I couldn’t believe the edge he achieved….you could shave a wing off a fly with them…..so I turned my grinder into a bealle buffer…and have been diamond sharpening ever since.

-- Woodworking.....My small slice of heaven!

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papadan

1174 posts in 2831 days


#9 posted 11-18-2009 05:54 AM

You want “scary sharp”, so just use the sandpaper and do the scary sharp method. Beats buying all the different materials being listed in this thread. No offense meant to anyone, everyone has thier preferred method of sharpening tools. I use a slow speed wet grinder from HF.

-- Carpenter assembles with hands, Designer builds with brains, Artist creates with heart!

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scrappy

3506 posts in 2893 days


#10 posted 11-18-2009 06:32 AM

I got a WorkSharp 3000. It is the best tool buy I have. Takes my lathe tools to a mirror finish on 3600 grit.

Just my opinion.

Scrappy

-- Scrap Wood's the best...the projects are smaller, and so is the mess!

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poopiekat

4224 posts in 3197 days


#11 posted 11-19-2009 02:29 AM

Thanks, everyone!
My ultimate goal is to wean myself away from arbitrarily reaching for power tools, and wherever possible I want to get re-acquainted with hand-tool alternatives. The hand tools I own have not seen the light of day in a long time, and I’m even considering giving up my good 2 HP saw in favor of a junky old 8” TS from the 50’s, when a 1/3 hp motor was sufficient, and just rough-in all cuts for further finishing by hand. All in favor of a desire to downsize, downscale, and quit trying to spread myself too thin. This is why I’m getting ready to tune up the traditional tools..
Thanks, one and all for your responses! Now…other than gradually shaving off all my arm hair, is there a reliable way to test the results of my sharpening experiments? What do you do?

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

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TopamaxSurvivor

17667 posts in 3138 days


#12 posted 11-19-2009 05:15 AM

You can cut paper :-))

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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