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Forum topic by ForestGrl posted 09-12-2015 12:45 AM 1736 views 1 time favorited 49 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ForestGrl

445 posts in 552 days


09-12-2015 12:45 AM

Topic tags/keywords: powered sanding angled drill sanding discs abranet question sanding

Oh, man, I started looking at powered sanding options—angle drill-type arrangement with the small pads, probably 2” to start with. Holy Smokes! way too much to choose from, and not cheap. So, I need your thoughts on what to consider for finishing relatively small bowls (up to 10”D) that won’t break the bank, stuff you’ve used successfully. As far as the drill goes, I see that there are 90-degree attachments out there, to put on your own drill, and angled drills that aren’t super expensive. Then the vast array of disc brands. I use Abranet on flat stock, the higher cost pays off with much higher durability, but not sure where to go with these small discs on a drill. Your thoughts?

-- My mother said that anyone learning to cook needed a large dog to eat the mistakes. As a sculptor of wood I have always tried to keep a fireplace. (Norman Ridenour)


49 replies so far

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

7179 posts in 2043 days


#1 posted 09-12-2015 01:04 AM

There was a You Tube video where the guy used Harbor freight 1/4” shank quick connect

bits for drills and made up an assortment of different grits for your application.

Ha ha I found it:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G44HICpHgqg

HTH

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

17172 posts in 2572 days


#2 posted 09-12-2015 01:11 AM

I bought the Harbor Freight 90 degree drill and I use it all the time for sanding pieces on the lathe and then leveling the bottom after I turn off the tenon and leave just a nub on the bottom. I have a 2” sanding pad with 1/4” shaft and use the serrated discs from klingspor.

At tone time Harbor Freight quit selling those drills but I did see them back a few months ago. I think they list at $30…....... well worth it …........better than holding a drill and a right angle attachment.

cheers, Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View Arlin Eastman's profile

Arlin Eastman

3557 posts in 2027 days


#3 posted 09-12-2015 02:15 AM

Jamie

Here is where I bought mine

http://www.woodworkingshop.com/product/tz20000/#.VfOJXcuFPUA

and the sandpaper

https://www.woodworkingshop.com/search.aspx?q=H%26L+Grit+Scalloped+Disc+

For small turnings you would want a 1.5” and 2” pads. When you get to turning bigger things you will need the 3” stuff.

-- Please help me help other Vets click..> http://www.gofundme.com/m1abko.....It is always the right time, to do the right thing.

View David Taylor's profile

David Taylor

326 posts in 553 days


#4 posted 09-12-2015 02:44 AM

For Abranet discs, not too bad money-wise, https://thesandingglove.com/Mirka-Abranet-Sanding-Discs.asp.

For a decent angle drill, again not too rich, well, I was going to link you to CPO Milwaukee reconditioned for a Milwaukee 0380-1, but I don’t see them there anymore or anywhere available for that matter. It’s too bad, with a 55 degree angled chuck it’s nice for sanding on a lathe. Maybe there’s something similar out there.

Now that I look a bit more, it’s not a Milwaukee, but … http://thesandingglove.com/Angle-Head-Drills.asp

-- Learn Relentlessly

View ForestGrl's profile

ForestGrl

445 posts in 552 days


#5 posted 09-12-2015 02:56 AM


For Abranet discs, not too bad money-wise, https://thesandingglove.com/Mirka-Abranet-Sanding-Discs.asp.
[Snip]
Now that I look a bit more, it s not a Milwaukee, but … http://thesandingglove.com/Angle-Head-Drills.asp

- dyfhid

Have you used Abranet discs for sanding bowls? I don’t want to assume that just because it works great on flat-stock, it’s also perfect for turning. Thanks for the link on the angle-head drills! I see they have soft, medium and firm disc holders. What might be the best choice for my 6”-10” bowls, mostly maple, alder or cherry? Different for a hard wood such as Madrone?

Sandingglove looks like a good resource. Another one I like is 2Sand.com They have good prices on Abranet, and you can get it in small quantities. Some grits, I can use a 100-pack, but for others I really don’t need more than 10 in a few years.

-- My mother said that anyone learning to cook needed a large dog to eat the mistakes. As a sculptor of wood I have always tried to keep a fireplace. (Norman Ridenour)

View ForestGrl's profile

ForestGrl

445 posts in 552 days


#6 posted 09-12-2015 03:01 AM



Jamie
Here is where I bought mine
http://www.woodworkingshop.com/product/tz20000/#.VfOJXcuFPUA
and the sandpaper
https://www.woodworkingshop.com/search.aspx?q=H%26L+Grit+Scalloped+Disc+

For small turnings you would want a 1.5” and 2” pads. When you get to turning bigger things you will need the 3” stuff.
- Arlin Eastman


Ahhh, I’d forgotten about the Klingspor/Woodworking Shop site. Before discovering Abranet, Klingspor was always my go-to sandpaper, and I like the company. I was planning on 2” pads, hope they won’t be too big. I have 3 very small bowls to do next week, was just going to hand-hold the paper for those. ;-) Thanks, Arlin!

-- My mother said that anyone learning to cook needed a large dog to eat the mistakes. As a sculptor of wood I have always tried to keep a fireplace. (Norman Ridenour)

View ForestGrl's profile

ForestGrl

445 posts in 552 days


#7 posted 09-12-2015 03:13 AM



There was a You Tube video where the guy used Harbor freight 1/4” shank quick connect
bits for drills and made up an assortment of different grits for your application.

Ha ha I found it:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G44HICpHgqg

HTH

- waho6o9

Thanks, I’ll check it out.

-- My mother said that anyone learning to cook needed a large dog to eat the mistakes. As a sculptor of wood I have always tried to keep a fireplace. (Norman Ridenour)

View ForestGrl's profile

ForestGrl

445 posts in 552 days


#8 posted 09-12-2015 03:16 AM



I bought the Harbor Freight 90 degree drill and I use it all the time for sanding pieces on the lathe and then leveling the bottom after I turn off the tenon and leave just a nub on the bottom. I have a 2” sanding pad with 1/4” shaft and use the serrated discs from klingspor.

At tone time Harbor Freight quit selling those drills but I did see them back a few months ago. I think they list at $30…....... well worth it …........better than holding a drill and a right angle attachment.

cheers, Jim

- Jim Jakosh

What’s the deal with the serrated discs? They must have an advantage, yes? Also, what would you recommend for the disc holder: soft? medium? hard? depends on the wood? Thanks!

-- My mother said that anyone learning to cook needed a large dog to eat the mistakes. As a sculptor of wood I have always tried to keep a fireplace. (Norman Ridenour)

View ForestGrl's profile

ForestGrl

445 posts in 552 days


#9 posted 09-12-2015 03:40 AM

Well, one thing for sure: I won’t be buying the current Milwaukee model. Look at these negative reviews” (30% of the total). Sounds like the earlier model was much better.

-- My mother said that anyone learning to cook needed a large dog to eat the mistakes. As a sculptor of wood I have always tried to keep a fireplace. (Norman Ridenour)

View LeeMills's profile

LeeMills

271 posts in 767 days


#10 posted 09-12-2015 04:02 AM

For 2” disc I use Vinces blue flex with radius interface pads.
http://vinceswoodnwonders.com/blue-flex-discs/
I tried the scalloped kind from other suppliers and the edges left more scratches than it removed (not Klingspores)
The blue flex is 25 for $4.75 which is a good price IMHO.
If you call him I’m sure he still offers a “starter kit” which has the main back and three interface for different grits and an assortment of grits. Pads in the blue flex are 2-3/8 so they wrap over the edge.

Vince has some short videos to explain the how/why of interface pads, different types disc offered. Using the interface pads do make a lot of difference.

Oh, I have a right angle drill attachment which I used to start with. Outside or large items it is not bad; for interior it is difficult to maneuver if you can even get it inside for items much less than 6 or 7 inches. By the time you add the angle, the chuck, the sanding head, and the interface pads it may be 3-4” length.
I do have a Milwaukee but mine is older and the switch is not a problem but it is Very Heavy and I usually use the tool rest for support.

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

View ForestGrl's profile

ForestGrl

445 posts in 552 days


#11 posted 09-12-2015 04:11 AM



For 2” disc I use Vinces blue flex with radius interface pads.
http://vinceswoodnwonders.com/blue-flex-discs/
I tried the scalloped kind from other suppliers and the edges left more scratches than it removed (not Klingspores)
The blue flex is 25 for $4.75 which is a good price IMHO.
If you call him I m sure he still offers a “starter kit” which has the main back and three interface for different grits and an assortment of grits. Pads in the blue flex are 2-3/8 so they wrap over the edge.

Vince has some short videos to explain the how/why of interface pads, different types disc offered. Using the interface pads do make a lot of difference.
- LeeMills

Thanks, Lee, looks like a company I might want to buy from! I’m not seeing blue flex in 2-3/8”, only the green. Web site might not be complete though. I’ll call and ask about a starter kit, good idea!

-- My mother said that anyone learning to cook needed a large dog to eat the mistakes. As a sculptor of wood I have always tried to keep a fireplace. (Norman Ridenour)

View LeeMills's profile

LeeMills

271 posts in 767 days


#12 posted 09-12-2015 04:39 AM



Thanks, Lee, looks like a company I might want to buy from! I m not seeing blue flex in 2-3/8”, only the green. Web site might not be complete though. I ll call and ask about a starter kit, good idea!
- ForestGrl

I didn’t see them either but the hardware should be the same, just a different paper (mylar).

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

1886 posts in 1601 days


#13 posted 09-12-2015 11:49 AM

If scroll down the page will find 2 3/8” disc.
http://vinceswoodnwonders.com/blue-flex-discs/

Can also see & get more info going to home page.
http://vinceswoodnwonders.com/store/

-- Bill

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

4997 posts in 3129 days


#14 posted 09-12-2015 01:55 PM

Have you used Abranet discs for sanding bowls?

Yes … I use them in conjunction with velcro discs and backers from Vince Welsh http://vinceswoodnwonders.com/store/

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

826 posts in 1196 days


#15 posted 09-12-2015 01:56 PM

FG, I’ve been using a pneumatic right angle drill for the last 4 years. My air compressor just about keeps up with it. The arbors I have are for twist lock discs. They come in 1” to 3” od in grits from 36 – 240 for wood. I haven’t found any finer grits, as I get them from 3M.
The beauty of pneumatics is they don’t get hot with extended use. If you have an air compressor that produces over 6 cfm free air, the tool is perfect for the job. There also is no possibility of being accidentally elctrocuted by using pneumatic tools. I don’t have any info on it right now, but will post it after I get back from my woodturning meeting today if your interested…........ Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson)

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