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Forum topic by monster1971 posted 09-11-2015 02:01 PM 631 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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monster1971

45 posts in 462 days


09-11-2015 02:01 PM

Topic tags/keywords: water based pre stain poly

I have never used water based finish but have recently purchased some for my project. I will be applying all water based products, pre-stain, stain, and poly. Going to done in my basement shop with minimal ventilation. Any tips would help. Project is a pine coffee table. Thanks in advance.

Tips, things to avoid or look out for??


8 replies so far

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115202 posts in 3043 days


#1 posted 09-11-2015 02:12 PM

Some WB products are better than others ,I like General Finishes products.With pine it’s very important to use a good pre-stain to prevent blotch,I like Charles Neil’s Blotch control. Like any finishing it’s always a good idea to do a test on scrap wood first before you finish your project

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3947 posts in 1959 days


#2 posted 09-11-2015 02:15 PM

Only 2 things I’ll opine. The first is the raised grain problem, and I suspect it may be worse with pine (just a guess). You can pre raise the grain and smooth, then finish. If you do that you will still need to sand a little once your top coat is applied. What I do is wait for the first coat of finish with a binder. That locks in the fibers, sand it smooth and you’re done with grain raising. The second thing is a little different. Just because these finishes don’t have a petroleum based solvent in them doesn’t mean they are not hazardous to your health. the glycols and whatnot in them can still be harmful, so i would wear a good organic vapor respirator.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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bonesbr549

1176 posts in 2533 days


#3 posted 09-11-2015 02:49 PM

I’ve made (for the most part) the transition to waterbase now due me seeing the writing on the wall that they will soon ban oil base anyway. It is a diff animal, but I’ve grown to like it. Clean up is a dream, and speed of application is sweet. I can shoot a coat and in 2 hrs be ready to sand and do another coat. I’d reccomend dye’s though. Easy to correct if something happens in application, and for top coat, you will have to get use to that milky look when it goes on. From an old oil finish guy that was the hardest part it just looked wrong going on. It will be ok when dry though.

I’ve become a huge fan of general finishes, and don’t mix products. Pick a brand and stick with it.

One final thought. Only thing I don’t like is you will not get that amber deep tone with waterbase that you get with oil, it just wont happen.

Now days I prefer it over oil, and will only do oil if the client wants it

I’ve literally applied 4 coats of clear in an afternoon with no issue. Love it.. Good luck.

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

View Earlextech's profile

Earlextech

1159 posts in 2156 days


#4 posted 09-11-2015 03:07 PM

Been using WB for 35 years. Never had an issue or a problem because of it. I agree it’s important to stick with a brand, don’t mix products, you’re asking for trouble. You can get the amber tone, if you want it, by adding a few drop of amber trans tint to a quart of finish. http://www.woodcraft.com/product/128481/transtint-dyes-honey-amber.aspx

-- Sam Hamory - The project is never finished until its "Finished"!

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monster1971

45 posts in 462 days


#5 posted 09-11-2015 07:28 PM

Fred, Thanks for the insight. Can you elaborate on “What I do is wait for the first coat of finish with a binder”. Do you mean once I pre-stain I may need to sand due to raised grain?

Fran

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monster1971

45 posts in 462 days


#6 posted 09-11-2015 07:32 PM

I am glad you mention General Finish. I watched a few YouTube videos with a Rep explaining Finishing. I was sure what to make of the product but since two of you recommend it its now on my radar.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115202 posts in 3043 days


#7 posted 09-11-2015 07:40 PM

Fred may have a different answer than I but the pre-conditioner may raise the grain so a light sanding after it’s dry will knock down some raised grain the apply the dye/stain,let dry then your top coat, let dry according to instructions on the can and then another light sanding,top coat sanding should not be more course than 400 grit but preferably 600 grit.
This ia a light sanding just as if you’re just wiping dust off of an object,don’t over sand,then apply the second coat.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3947 posts in 1959 days


#8 posted 09-11-2015 07:56 PM

You had listed using several products, I normally don’t do that so am not sure where I would sand the whiskers off in your schedule. Not having used a “pre-conditioner” or “pre-stain”, I’m only guessing; but of of that stuff is just very thin finish and you could probably smooth it after you apply them. About the most I’ll do is apply color, and that’s typically a dye (no binders) so it doesn’t lock in the whiskers. But after I apply the first coat of finish I can smooth it out and go from there. I think Jim has the approach to use if you have that many items in your schedule.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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