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Lathe advice????

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Forum topic by stonecarver posted 09-11-2015 12:05 AM 796 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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stonecarver

2 posts in 455 days


09-11-2015 12:05 AM

I’m about to trade for a lathe, but being new to it not sure if it’s large/powerful enough for what I’m wanting to do. I need a lathe able to turn cups and bowls. The lathe is a Sears 149.23871. Does anyone have experience with this model?


11 replies so far

View brian55's profile

brian55

4 posts in 3050 days


#1 posted 09-11-2015 12:31 AM

I would pass on that lathe. The tube design of the ways is not very rigid, and the lathe is a poor design.

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

5765 posts in 952 days


#2 posted 09-11-2015 12:44 AM

What he said. Unless the guy would take 40$.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

1886 posts in 1601 days


#3 posted 09-11-2015 11:15 AM

You might want to see what lathes are out there and check prices before looking at used lathes. For what you say want to turn could get by with a mini, midi, or full size lathe. If live near a turning club talk to them many times let new turners attend a meeting free.

https://www.google.com/search?site=&tbm=isch&source=hp&biw=1280&bih=635&q=wood+lathes&oq=wood+lathes&gs_l=img.3..0l2j0i5i30l8.458.3891.0.4385.11.11.0.0.0.0.274.1535.0j8j2.10.0.ccynfh...0...1.1.64.img..1.10.1523.HZxITa6siuc

-- Bill

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Bmezz

34 posts in 849 days


#4 posted 09-11-2015 11:16 AM

$40 is too much. Walk away and wait for a proper lathe. Join a local turning club and learn what you need and what you don’t. A basic course will save you time, money and possible personal injury.

-- Member Valley Woodturners Ottawa

View Clarkie's profile

Clarkie

380 posts in 1307 days


#5 posted 09-11-2015 11:53 AM

That lathe is a piece of junk, pass and then look for a substantial lathe. Nothing with tubes, double or single, plus look at the material it is made of, the tailstock on that is a joke.

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

4997 posts in 3129 days


#6 posted 09-11-2015 12:12 PM

A local woodturning club would be a great first step. There are AAW (American Association of Woodturners) chapters all over the country.

To see chapters in your neck of the woods, check out: http://www.woodturner.org/?page=Chapters

You don’t have to join right away. Local chapters welcome guests (and prospective members) and provide you with a valuable resource.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

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stonecarver

2 posts in 455 days


#7 posted 09-11-2015 07:38 PM

Thank you everyone for your responses. You saved me a very costly mistake!

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4234 posts in 1665 days


#8 posted 09-11-2015 08:01 PM

Thank you everyone for your responses. You saved me a very costly mistake!

I guess that depends on what it was you were going to trade for it :)

Honestly, if you were just swapping machines and the one you are giving up wasn’t worth much to you, then it might be a fair deal. At least it would let you dip your toe into the wood turning pond. The two tube models are a bit better than the ones with a single tube as it reduces twisting a bit more, but neither are as good as one with a cast iron bed. You can turn stuff on that lathe within it’s limits, and at first, you aren’t going to be trying to turn huge bowls, so it could be a good intro machine until you figure out (or run across) something bigger/beefier/better later on.

Cheers,
Brad

PS: It also appears to have a fair amount of tooling and accessories, which is a good thing.

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View brian55's profile

brian55

4 posts in 3050 days


#9 posted 09-11-2015 11:40 PM

Look for a Jet 1236 or a Delta 1440 for a good starting point in a “full size” lathe. Either of the two are good selections to dip your toes into the turning vortex. You can go with a Jet or Rikon mini-lathe if you want to start with something smaller, but I suspect that you will soon outgrow either of these.

View ForestGrl's profile

ForestGrl

445 posts in 552 days


#10 posted 09-12-2015 12:00 AM


[Snip] I need a lathe able to turn cups and bowls.

- stonecarver

Bowls of what size? An important question to consider. I have an old Jet 1236, fastened to a shop-made “mobile” base made of 4×4’s, weighted only by turning tools and tool rests in a box at the moment. It’s fine for 8”-9” bowls so far, doesn’t dance across the floor—but I don’t throw a big chunk-o-log on it either. It may need more weight when approaching the maximum 12” swing. If your bowls will be in that neighborhood, then a 1236 should work fine for you. From everything I’ve read, might be best to stay away from tube-lathes. Lesson I learned from Lathe#1 was: Check to be sure the headstock and tailstock line up. Also, listen for bearing noise. I’m sure there are other things on the checklist, but those two I missed the first time around.

Jamie

-- My mother said that anyone learning to cook needed a large dog to eat the mistakes. As a sculptor of wood I have always tried to keep a fireplace. (Norman Ridenour)

View ForestGrl's profile

ForestGrl

445 posts in 552 days


#11 posted 09-12-2015 12:05 AM

Ahhh, just noticed the tools in the picture. Some of the older Craftsman (and Rockwell) tools can be quite nice, but be careful if you buy used tools—be sure they are high-speed steel. I recently bought a 6- or 7-piece set of Rockwells from the 1970s. They are HSS, unused and really fine tools (except gouges are shallow-flute and ground in an odd old-fashioned way). Do you know how to test for carbon v. HSS?

-- My mother said that anyone learning to cook needed a large dog to eat the mistakes. As a sculptor of wood I have always tried to keep a fireplace. (Norman Ridenour)

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