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Forum topic by njp posted 09-10-2015 04:34 PM 652 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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njp

4 posts in 455 days


09-10-2015 04:34 PM

Topic tags/keywords: bookcase jatoba galvanized pipe

Hi,

As my first project I decided to build a small bookcase for my office. Design of the book case includes:
3 shelves using Jatoba (measuring 32 inches long x 12 inches wide x 2 inches thick)

At this point I have sanded the jatoba wood working my way up the grits from 60 > 80 > 100 > 150 > 220.

My plan was to build the shelving structure using 1 inch galvanized piping. Saw some ideas on-line. Having been thinking about:
1. Building two ladder like structures and just laying each end of the wood on the ladder piping.
pros: easy to do
cons: won’t be very stable and looks a little un-finished

2. Building two ladder like structures, but drilling 4 holes into and through the wood on each corner. Using this technique I can then slide or lower each shelve onto the piping structure.
pros: bookcase should be more stable
cons: I have to drill through the wood

3. On the surface of each piece of wood, I will use galvanized pipe floor flanges and attach 4 in each corner of the wood using screws for each floor flange. I can then screw a pipe into each flange and build the shelf up that way.
pros: is the look I’m going for
cons: I’ve read that Jatoba wood is very difficult to put screws into, that screws break. Also each piece of this 32 inch long jatoba must weigh 20 pounds. I’m afraid the screws in wood of the floor flanges won’t hold up say if I go to move the bookcase and it will come apart.

Option 2 might be my best way to proceed. However, I need to drill a 1 inch wide hole through Jatoba that is 2 inches thick. Do you think I can successfully do this with a hole saw? I don’t have any scrap to practice on either.

Thanks!
(I’ve already learned to research the wood first before purchasing :) )


8 replies so far

View Mark Kornell's profile

Mark Kornell

1061 posts in 1996 days


#1 posted 09-10-2015 05:07 PM

I’ve done a few projects with jatoba, have.not found any issues with working it. Yes, it is hard and dense, but it machines well.

You should have.no problems with the hole saw as long as you drill straight. If you have a drill press, use that.

Also, no issues with driving screws into jatoba. You need to drill a pilot hole first, and the pilot hole should be the same size as screw shank.

Edit: screws hold well in jatoba. If you use 3 or 4 per flange and there are.4 flanges per shelf, you won’t be.able to break it. Make the screws as long as you can – for a 2” thickness, use a 1 1/2” screw.

-- Mark Kornell, Kornell Wood Design

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

808 posts in 2315 days


#2 posted 09-10-2015 08:13 PM

NJP, if you haven’t already, I’d suggest you download Sketchup and learn how to build your project there first, I’ve found it very helpful to design and alter ideas in Sketchup 1st before learning my expensive lessons in the woodshop. It will have some good tutorials to get you familiar and then there are great walk throughs on You tube, like this for example;

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

View Yonak's profile

Yonak

979 posts in 986 days


#3 posted 09-10-2015 08:55 PM


—I’ve decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it… and learn how to not repeat it.

- ChefHDAN

I know what you mean, Dan. That’s why I like to make as many mistakes as I can. My record confirms it.

View Yonak's profile

Yonak

979 posts in 986 days


#4 posted 09-10-2015 08:56 PM

I believe I would, at least, paint the piping. Jatoba deserves at least that.

View njp's profile

njp

4 posts in 455 days


#5 posted 09-12-2015 06:46 PM

Thanks Mark for the tips Mark. Sounds like screws should work if I am careful enough.


I ve done a few projects with jatoba, have.not found any issues with working it. Yes, it is hard and dense, but it machines well.

You should have.no problems with the hole saw as long as you drill straight. If you have a drill press, use that.

Also, no issues with driving screws into jatoba. You need to drill a pilot hole first, and the pilot hole should be the same size as screw shank.

Edit: screws hold well in jatoba. If you use 3 or 4 per flange and there are.4 flanges per shelf, you won t be.able to break it. Make the screws as long as you can – for a 2” thickness, use a 1 1/2” screw.

- Mark Kornell


View njp's profile

njp

4 posts in 455 days


#6 posted 09-12-2015 06:50 PM

Wow thanks for the sketch! Didn’t know this tool was available. Thanks, yes I’m almost already $200 into the wood so any screw ups would be heart breaking. I’ll try this tool out.


NJP, if you haven t already, I d suggest you download Sketchup and learn how to build your project there first, I ve found it very helpful to design and alter ideas in Sketchup 1st before learning my expensive lessons in the woodshop. It will have some good tutorials to get you familiar and then there are great walk throughs on You tube, like this for example;
- ChefHDAN

View njp's profile

njp

4 posts in 455 days


#7 posted 09-12-2015 06:53 PM

Looks like I’ll try staining it with Waterlox and see how that goes. Depending on how it turns out, I’ll choose a colour to paint the pipes so that it compliments it.

Wish I had the skills to build the structure from wood, but I’m not there yet.


I believe I would, at least, paint the piping. Jatoba deserves at least that.

- Yonak


View SirIrb's profile

SirIrb

1239 posts in 696 days


#8 posted 09-12-2015 07:16 PM

Brazilian cherry = large supply of lemon juice.

You’ll figure it out after you work with it a while. The stuff turns your hands black. Lemon juice will remove the black. Not soap.

Nice stuff, though.

-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

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