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Forum topic by ferstler posted 09-10-2015 03:50 PM 696 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ferstler

341 posts in 2986 days


09-10-2015 03:50 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

I first posted this in the hand tools section, by accident, because, well, a battery powered hand tool is held in the hand. Anyway, here is the entry again, updated, and probably in a better location:

I have some older Ridgid hand tools: 12-volt nicad types.

Ridgid has discontinued those tools and the batteries are no longer available from Home Depot. You can get them direct, I think, and even Amazon offers them from a few ancillary suppliers, as do some offbeat stores, but I have also read some reviews of those batteries that were not complementary. There are quality variables.

A local battery store rebuilt two of mine for me and one seemed OK. However, to check the charge levels when I got home I put each into my Ridgid charger and one of them caused the charger to start smoking. I was stumped until I put the battery into one of my Ridgid drills and when set to run forward it ran backward! They had the thing reverse charged and my charger was ruined. Fortunately, I have a second charger and while I temporarily tried checking the battery in it, I pulled it out quickly enough to probably not do damage. I hope.

Today, I took the battery back to the shop for an explanation, and the technician looked at the way the thing ran the drill backwards (I also brought the other, properly done battery as an OK reference), and hopefully it can be re-booted and also hopefully my second charger at home will be OK. The technician seemed mystified by the way the battery behaved. I wonder if anyone here has had similar experiences with either the Ridgid supply situation or a bad rebuild job.

I have some Ryobi hand tools, too, and, budget-tool company or not, I will hand it to Ryobi: they do not leave you hanging out to dry when they come out with a new hand tool. The older batteries work in them, and the newer batteries work in the older tools. This is odd, given that they are part of the same corporation as Ridgid.

Normally, I would not be concerned, because I have two 18-volt Ryobi drills and really do not need my Ridgid drill. However, I do have a Ridgid, low-profile impact driver that uses those batteries and THAT item IS important.

It is too bad that companies do not offer powered hand tools that can be run by battery and can also be run by a plug-in converter that uses AC wall power. That way, if the batteries can no longer be found you can at least use the tool the old-fashioned way.

Howard Ferstler


8 replies so far

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RDan

17 posts in 1790 days


#1 posted 09-11-2015 05:12 AM

Ryobi is starting to advertise Hybrid tools that do this mostly in their 18 volt yard tools. Skill or B&D marketed one some years back. I think it was somewhat lack luster in sales. Dan

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Shahidan

28 posts in 986 days


#2 posted 09-12-2015 01:49 AM

I learned that you can open a dead battery casing and remove the dead cells. These batteries are rechargble batteries and if you can find cells of similar size all you have to do is to rewire them the way the old cells are connected. If you connect them the wrong way round the positive contact may become a negative contact. When you try to charge the battery it will ruin the charger. If the cells are ready charged when you connect them together you drill will reverse on the forward. I never tried this but in theory it will work .

To tell you the truth I do not own a single cordless dill.I have three cordless drills given to me because it either too expensive to replace the batteries or no replacement is available. It is a waste to throw them away, so I made power supplies for them and use them like ordinary drills albite with with a very safe low voltage. And you do have to charge the power supplies; just plug in.i

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ferstler

341 posts in 2986 days


#3 posted 09-12-2015 03:40 PM

Shahidan,

Thanks for the feedback. Could you feed me some additional details about the power supplies you built. I have done a lot of electrical work myself, but have no experience building items like that. I assume you use an oversized transformer/converter connected to the wall outlet, and then run a big-enough, DC carrying cord from the converter to the home-modified adaptor that plugs into the drill. I do not think that a typical wall-wart transformer would be hefty enough to carry the load.

Sounds nifty in any case.

Howard

View toolie's profile

toolie

2025 posts in 2094 days


#4 posted 09-12-2015 08:46 PM



I first posted this in the hand tools section, by accident, because, well, a battery powered hand tool is held in the hand. Anyway, here is the entry again, updated, and probably in a better location:

I have some older Ridgid hand tools: 12-volt nicad types.

Ridgid has discontinued those tools and the batteries are no longer available from Home Depot. You can get them direct, I think, and even Amazon offers them from a few ancillary suppliers, as do some offbeat stores, but I have also read some reviews of those batteries that were not complementary. There are quality variables.

A local battery store rebuilt two of mine for me and one seemed OK. However, to check the charge levels when I got home I put each into my Ridgid charger and one of them caused the charger to start smoking. I was stumped until I put the battery into one of my Ridgid drills and when set to run forward it ran backward! They had the thing reverse charged and my charger was ruined. Fortunately, I have a second charger and while I temporarily tried checking the battery in it, I pulled it out quickly enough to probably not do damage. I hope.

Today, I took the battery back to the shop for an explanation, and the technician looked at the way the thing ran the drill backwards (I also brought the other, properly done battery as an OK reference), and hopefully it can be re-booted and also hopefully my second charger at home will be OK. The technician seemed mystified by the way the battery behaved. I wonder if anyone here has had similar experiences with either the Ridgid supply situation or a bad rebuild job.

I have some Ryobi hand tools, too, and, budget-tool company or not, I will hand it to Ryobi: they do not leave you hanging out to dry when they come out with a new hand tool. The older batteries work in them, and the newer batteries work in the older tools. This is odd, given that they are part of the same corporation as Ridgid.

Normally, I would not be concerned, because I have two 18-volt Ryobi drills and really do not need my Ridgid drill. However, I do have a Ridgid, low-profile impact driver that uses those batteries and THAT item IS important.

It is too bad that companies do not offer powered hand tools that can be run by battery and can also be run by a plug-in converter that uses AC wall power. That way, if the batteries can no longer be found you can at least use the tool the old-fashioned way.

Howard Ferstler

- ferstler

did you register your tools for the LSA? anytime any of my ridgid tools start performing badly, i have them repaired or replaced (batteries)

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

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SignWave

321 posts in 2501 days


#5 posted 09-12-2015 10:47 PM

I’m sure that everyone who has had a NiCad battery powered drill will experience lack of support for these eventually. They are larger than comparable Li-ION batteries, don’t hold a charge as long, have “memory” issues, take longer to charge, and tend to wear out sooner.

The first time my battery packs died, I got a new drill that uses the same batteries which included two new batteries for less than the cost of two individual battery packs. This gave me a spare drill, which was kind of nice.

When those died, I replaced the cells in a couple battery packs myself, and it was tedious but do-able. It is quite possible that the technician who did yours wired them backward. Almost certain, based on your description. FWIW, they’re 1.2V each and they’re wired in series to get larger voltages. That’s why you end up with odd values like 7.2V or 14.4V, etc.

I finally let go of the old drills and replaced them with smaller, lighter, and better performing newer Li-ION models. Yes, it seems like a waste, but hanging on to NiCad units really throwing good money and effort at an obsolete product.

-- Barry, http://BarrysWorkshop.com/

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ferstler

341 posts in 2986 days


#6 posted 09-12-2015 11:26 PM

toolie. I thought I had registered every Ridgid tool I purchased, but I may had skipped doing it with any of the hand tools. I certainly did do it with my jobsite saw, 12-inch slider, drill press, band saw, and jointer. Anyway, I was under the impression that the Ridgid lifetime warranty did not apply to batteries. I should have checked closer.

Signwave. The shop I went to in order to have those batteries rebuilt (by the way, they fixed the reversed version free of charge, needless to say) indicated that they only rebuild NiCads. Apparently, the LI-ION versions have some internal circuitry that they could not deal with. This seems logical, because the earlier chargers designed for NiCads are supposedly not able to recharge LI-ION versions. Of course, some shops might be able to rebuild LI-ION versions.

Anyway, for me at least, and this assumes that you have a good shop that can rebuild NiCads over and over, it makes sense to purchase NiCads instead of lithium versions. Just keep rebuilding the things.

I can see the logic in just trading up to a new drill package (complete with two batteries) when that costs no more than replacing or rebuilding batteries, but I have a constitutional aversion to trashing a tool that is workable. In addition, as best I can tell Ridgid does not have an exact replacement for that low-profile drill driver I use, although I guess that their combo unit with replaceable heads offers a head for the motor section that can do it. I wonder how long they will keep that combo unit in production with batteries you can buy at Home Depot.

Whatever, I seriously resent the fact that Ridgid has made the kind of battery changes they have, especially when the junior partner in the corporation, Ryobi, has been making new tools that use the earlier batteries and that their newer batteries fit the old tools. If Ryobi does this, Ridgid should do it, too.

I also continue to wonder whey companies do not offer AC/DC convertible versions that would save customers money and trouble. Oops, I forgot. The companies are in the business to make money and not pander to customers.

Incidentally, I opened up the burnt-up charger (and I hope my second charger is OK; it seems that way), and was really surprised at just how complex the circuitry appears to be. It looks like a radio or small amplifier circuit board in there, and it is remarkable that they could produce something that detailed for a reasonable price. You have to hand it to the Chinese.

Howard

View Shahidan's profile

Shahidan

28 posts in 986 days


#7 posted 09-13-2015 02:41 AM

ferstler (Howrd) It is simple enough.
First you need a step down transformer ._Those plugins would not operate the drill as the current is too low even though the voltage is right The output current of 2.5 to 3 Amperes is sufficient at 12 to 14Vac. I used 14V because there is a voltage drop as the current flows through the bridge rectifier. A power supply giving out slightly more than 12dc is ok as you are not operating the drill continuously. No time to overheat.

As you have done a lot of electrical work constructing a power supply will be easy. I am attaching here a simple circuit which works without any complication. .Once done connect the output to the terminals of the drill. You can either open up the drill and make the connections or do like I did by soldering the leads to yhr terminals inside the battery compartment. It is a little difficult because of the limited space but I manage to do it all the time.You have to use a 40W or a 60W soldering iron as the contacts are rather thick.
I used about 8 feet long loudspeaker wires as the supply leads as ordinary wires are a bit lossy. You can use a three core extension cable if you like. Make sure the wires are connected the right way round.

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Shahidan

28 posts in 986 days


#8 posted 09-13-2015 02:47 AM

Howard,
I am not promoting my website. If you like please go to http://asm.com.my to see the details of converting a cordless drill to work on 12Vdc power.

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