LumberJocks

Problem with older Ridgid hand-tool battery

  • Advertise with us

« back to Hand Tools forum

Forum topic by ferstler posted 09-10-2015 02:39 AM 734 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View ferstler's profile

ferstler

341 posts in 2987 days


09-10-2015 02:39 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question

I have some older Ridgid hand tools: 12-volt nicad types.

Ridgid has discontinued those tools and the batteries are no longer available from Home Depot. You can get them direct, I think, and even Amazon offers them, as do some offbeat stores, but I have also read some reviews of those batteries that were not complementary. There are quality variables.

A local battery store rebuilt two of mine for me and one seemed OK. However, to check the charge levels when I got home I put each into my Ridgid charger and one of them caused the charger to start smoking. I was stumped until I put the battery into one of my Ridgid drills and when set to run forward it rand backward! They had the thing reverse charged and my charger was ruined. Fortunately, I have a second charger and while I temporarily tried checking the battery in it, I pulled it out quickly enough to probably not do damage. I hope.

I plan on taking the battery back to the shop for an explanation, and hopefully a $33 refund, but I wonder if anyone here has had similar experiences with either the Ridgid supply situation or a bad rebuild job.

I have some Ryobi hand tools, too, and I will hand it to Ryobi: they do not leave you hanging out to dry when they come out with a new hand tool. The older batteries work in them, and the newer batteries work in the older tools. This is odd, given that they are part of the same corporation.

Howard Ferstler


9 replies so far

View Johnny7's profile

Johnny7

208 posts in 557 days


#1 posted 09-10-2015 02:53 AM

Ya might want to ask this over in power tools

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

809 posts in 2316 days


#2 posted 09-10-2015 08:16 AM

Howard this is what sucks about the battery tools over the corded. Seems like every few years you buy the tool over again in new batteries and then along comes the new battery…. I only have drill drivers on batt now and watch the black Friday/Christmas sales for battery deals or even the deals on new tools, one year I found an entire kit for less than buying my usual two new batteries. I recently used one of the new 20v LiON dewalt drivers and am now watching the prices on those. This does not help you much with your question I realize but it’s the best solution to the reality I’ve come to face

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

View ferstler's profile

ferstler

341 posts in 2987 days


#3 posted 09-10-2015 03:37 PM

Sorry about that Johnny7. Remember, however, that the tools involved ARE used by hand. I certainly do not handle them with my feet or teeth.

View Johnny7's profile

Johnny7

208 posts in 557 days


#4 posted 09-10-2015 03:40 PM



Sorry about that Johnny7. Remember, however, that the tools involved ARE used by hand. I certainly do not handle them with my feet or teeth.

- ferstler

Let me help you out—if it has a cord and plugs into the wall—it’s a power tool and not a hand tool.

View ferstler's profile

ferstler

341 posts in 2987 days


#5 posted 09-10-2015 04:15 PM

Hey, Johnny7,

The thing does not have a cord and plugs into a wall. It is a battery, and once charged up it operates free of cords. That is one of the reasons people like the type. And I can think of no way to operate a battery powered tool of that kind without using my hands.

Anyway, I reposted to the power-tool section.

Howard

View ferstler's profile

ferstler

341 posts in 2987 days


#6 posted 09-10-2015 04:20 PM

Dan, thanks for the responses.

Today, I took the battery back to the shop for an explanation, and the technician looked at the way the thing ran the drill backwards (I also brought the other, properly done battery as an OK reference), and hopefully it can be re-booted and also hopefully my second charger at home will be OK. The technician seemed mystified by the way the battery behaved. We shall see.

Normally, I would not be concerned, because I have two 18-volt Ryobi drills, plus three large and small AC powered drills, and really do not need my Ridgid drill, although I appreciate its lighter weight and smaller size at times. However, I do have a Ridgid, low-profile impact driver that uses those batteries and THAT item IS important, because I have used it when doing interior bracing with some cabinets I have built. (Tight fits inside, at times.) Pitching that tool would be a traumatic experience for me, and I am not even sure that Ridgid makes a newer version. I have seen some other brands that do the same thing (even saw one at Walmart of all places that has a dedicated lithium battery), and if push comes to shove I will get one of those. However, down the line the same problem will eventually repeat.

It seems weird that many of those battery-powered hand tools seem well made and would probably last a LONG time if the batteries could be regularly replaced. It actually seems borderline criminal, because we end up filling up landfills with items that are actually mechanically OK.

It is too bad that companies do not offer powered hand tools that can be run by battery and can ALSO be run by a plug-in converter that uses AC wall power. That way, if the batteries can no longer be found you can at least use the tool the old-fashioned way.

Anyway, we shall see how things move along with the similar message I posted in the power-tool section.

Howard

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2198 posts in 947 days


#7 posted 09-12-2015 01:08 PM

I had the same scenario with the same Ridgid drills.
Ended up throwing away 2 perfectly good drills when my last battery went bad.
For the cost of replacement batteries and/or chargers compared to a whole new set its a no brainer.

I also had to dump a 19.2V PC kit because of obsolete batteries/chargers.

It was a great set they gave me $100 off on a LI 18V set but the first set was better.

All part of our disposable world…...newer is better????

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View thirdrail's profile

thirdrail

54 posts in 2131 days


#8 posted 09-12-2015 01:23 PM

It seems hard to take but battery operated tools are disposables. Eventually either the technology obsoletes your current tool or replacement batteries increase in price because demand slows for “last year’s” model. Pretty soon one “good” replacement battery costs more than half the cost of a new, probably better, tool on sale.

-- Third rail

View ferstler's profile

ferstler

341 posts in 2987 days


#9 posted 09-12-2015 04:11 PM

Thanks, guys. Yes, it is sad about the throwaway nature of those tools, because they are actually pretty robust in themselves. I can do without the drill (or any battery-powered drill, probably), but I really like that low-profile impact wrench. It has allowed me to work in some tight places that a regular impact wrench would not fit.

Anyway, I am headed for the battery shop to pick up the re-rebuilt battery and can now only hope that my second charger still is working OK. The other is kaput.

One other correspondent has mentioned that it is possible to build a converter rig that can power a drill or driver like that with a 12 volt DC feed. A battery would have to be dismantled to get the proper connector, of course. We shall see.

Howard

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com