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Forum topic by Dave Haynes posted 11-15-2009 05:07 PM 1174 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Dave Haynes

200 posts in 2108 days


11-15-2009 05:07 PM

A while back I had a guy to e-mail me through my woodworking website asking about the identity of a very old woodworking machine of some type. He inclosed the attached pictures of the machine.

Old Machine 4
Old Machine 3
Old Machine 2
Old Machine 1

On the bottom piece across and between the two legs is the following: C.B. Rogers &Co. Norwich Ct. Pat Sept 1, 1868.

I responded to him that I had never seen anything like this and couldn’t be of much help but told him I would see if anyone on LJ could help identify the machine…...so here’s my shot. Can anyone help?

Dave

-- Dave Haynes, Indiana, http://www.oldaveswoodshop.com


17 replies so far

View rtb's profile

rtb

1099 posts in 2468 days


#1 posted 11-15-2009 05:40 PM

Are we even certain that this is a woodworking machine ?

-- RTB. stray animals are just looking for love

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rtb

1099 posts in 2468 days


#2 posted 11-15-2009 05:57 PM

If you google the maker you will see a list of the products that C.B.Rodgers made . There are seeral pivtures but none that seem to bee similar to this one wonder if it migh be used to transfor power to another woodworking machine ? It does ppear that all of the machines were for woodworking. Industerial of course.

-- RTB. stray animals are just looking for love

View Shamus's profile

Shamus

16 posts in 1872 days


#3 posted 11-15-2009 05:57 PM

I found the following in a quick net search.

81. A PICTORIAL OF AMERICAN MOLDING MACHINES from 1847-1940. Volume I from 1847-1895. 218 pages—$30. You will see incredible designs with commentary from original journals and trade catalogs for producing wooden moldings for furniture and houses. VOULME II: (1895-1940) 220 pages—$30. (both volumes for $55.) postpaid. Many sample cutter designs and large and small machines shown from such companies as Fay Egan, Rowley & Harmance, Hoyt Brothers, C. B. Rogers, H. B. Smith, Yates American, etc.

C. B. ROGERS & Co., machinists; capital stock, $200,000. Lyman GOULD, president; D. H. ROGERS, secretary; R. M. LADD, treasurer.

It looks like their line of wood-working machinery was was well know in their era. If the photo gave us a close-up of the top of the machine it would be a huge help in determining what it’s purpose was.

In any event, hopefully someone will be along with more info. I do enjoy seeing some of the early equipment.

View Derek Lyons's profile

Derek Lyons

584 posts in 2322 days


#4 posted 11-15-2009 06:04 PM

It would be nice to have some closer views of the works, but it looks like some kind of weird lathe.

-- Derek, Bremerton WA --

View GFYS's profile

GFYS

711 posts in 2225 days


#5 posted 11-15-2009 06:08 PM

sander/grinder?

View Occie gilliam's profile

Occie gilliam

505 posts in 2051 days


#6 posted 11-15-2009 06:42 PM

tell me more Dan
Occie

-- OC down in Costa Rica. come down and see me some time. I'll keep the light on for you too-oc@hotmail.com mail.com

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Occie gilliam

505 posts in 2051 days


#7 posted 11-15-2009 06:44 PM

Hi Derek
you can see biger picture at photo buckit
just click the picture if you dont already know it
Occie

-- OC down in Costa Rica. come down and see me some time. I'll keep the light on for you too-oc@hotmail.com mail.com

View KnotWright's profile

KnotWright

247 posts in 2242 days


#8 posted 11-15-2009 06:55 PM

Looks like it could be some kind of doweling machine, perhaps 3 different sizes, the wheel looks like its meant to turn the stock and if there is a cutter near the belt drive, that would sharpen the end of the dowel to then be used in a timber framed building?

Just a guess, but I think I saw something like this on This Old House, Norm toured a place that made the pins for a timber frame they were working on.

-- James

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11688 posts in 2442 days


#9 posted 11-15-2009 07:01 PM

Email the guy back and ask him for some close-up pictures of the “working parts” of the machine with some good lighting involved.

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

View GFYS's profile

GFYS

711 posts in 2225 days


#10 posted 11-15-2009 07:19 PM

It does look like some type of doweling machine.

View Moron's profile

Moron

4725 posts in 2648 days


#11 posted 11-15-2009 07:35 PM

I’m betting because it was belt driven, by a wall full of pulleys, that it was multifunctional

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

View Chris Wright's profile

Chris Wright

536 posts in 2236 days


#12 posted 11-15-2009 08:20 PM

I’m guessing it’s a power transfer machine. It doesn’t look to me like you could do a work with it, unless there’s parts that are missing.

-- "At its best, life is completely unpredictable." - Christopher Walken

View bent's profile

bent

311 posts in 2423 days


#13 posted 11-15-2009 08:39 PM

i think it’s an old anti-theft device. you catch someone stealing from your shop, and you use it remove one of their hands as punishment.

View Mark's profile

Mark

1788 posts in 2028 days


#14 posted 11-15-2009 08:59 PM

dowel/post sander?

-- My purpose in life: Making sawdust

View SnowyRiver's profile

SnowyRiver

51450 posts in 2235 days


#15 posted 11-16-2009 01:43 AM

Here is a website for old machinery. I didnt see your paticular model listed, but if you email them the pictures they may be able to help.

http://www.owwm.com/mfgindex/detail.aspx?id=701&tab=6

-- Wayne - Plymouth MN

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