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End grain cutting board repair

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Forum topic by Spacehog posted 09-09-2015 03:39 AM 892 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Spacehog

65 posts in 985 days


09-09-2015 03:39 AM

Topic tags/keywords: end grain cutting board repair teak polyurethane glue titebond ii titebond iii oil

Ahoy everyone! I’ve been making cutting boards for Christmas presents and such for a few years now. Over time I’ve gravitated towards thicker end grain cutting boards because they seem more durable. I’ve also started using butcher block finish (I think it’s beeswax and mineral oil) rather than mineral oil alone. Anyway, I’ve never had a problem with the boards that I’ve made for myself. But that could be because I keep them oiled regularly and I never run them through the dishwasher.

One of my friends did however run his board through the dishwasher, and he never put more oil on the board after the first time. As a result, there is a crack in the board which I am hoping to repair. This board is one of my earlier ones which is only about 3/4 inches thick and I never did put the butcher block on it. I think that the board is something I can repair, but I wanted to ask around before I went about trying to fix it.

So here’s the situation. The board is glued together with Titebond II wood glue, and the wood that cracked is teak. I know that teak is pretty dense and contains a decent amount of oil which could hinder wood glue adhesion. I was thinking of using Titebond III or Titebond Polyurethane glue to get the crack sealed back together. But if someone has another suggestion, I’m all ears. I do have some epoxy and other stuff that might work.

My plan is to just add a liberal amount of glue and then clamp to board again to close up the crack. But I wasn’t sure if I should do something to deal with the oils in the wood before I try to glue it. I can’t really fit much into the crack, so I thought I’d maybe hit it with a bit of Naphtha just before gluing or maybe just go ahead and glue it the way that it is with no further prep. Any insights you have on that would be appreciated.

I tried to include a picture, but my camera is awful, so I’m not sure how helpful it will be. Thanks in advance for any ideas you might have!

-- Whatever your hand finds to do, do it with all your might...


9 replies so far

View DavidTTU's profile

DavidTTU

115 posts in 1095 days


#1 posted 09-09-2015 03:43 AM

cut it in half and reglue it would be my advice.

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

3646 posts in 1725 days


#2 posted 09-09-2015 04:20 AM

Yeah, I’d have to agree with David. That would be the fastest and easiest way to repair that crack

View bobasaurus's profile

bobasaurus

2657 posts in 2644 days


#3 posted 09-09-2015 04:29 AM

I wonder if we could come up with a branding iron that just says “NO DISHWASHER” or “HAND WASH ONLY” for cutting boards. The cut-n-glue method seems like the only reasonable fixing option as David said. Hopefully the oil hasn’t soaked clear through so you have some dry wood to accept the glue.

-- Allen, Colorado

View Betsy's profile

Betsy

3338 posts in 3356 days


#4 posted 09-09-2015 04:56 AM

Agree with the above – cut in half, clean up the edges and re-glue. When you give it back put a big note on it about not throwing in the dishwasher. Everyone these days are so used to everything being dishwasher and microwave safe they don’t even think about something being all wood and what happens to it when soaked.

From the picture the board looks pretty dry, but still I would leave it open to air a day or two to give additional time to dry out the mineral oil before gluing.

If you are concerned about the Teak itself being an oily wood – there’s a controversy on whether you should wipe the teak down with acetone (or something similar) before gluing or if you just go straight to glue. Personally when I have used teak I have not used any pre-treatment – went straight to gluing. I’ve not had any cracks to date.

Hope that helps.

-- "Our past judges our present." JFK - 1962; American Heritage Magazine

View Spacehog's profile

Spacehog

65 posts in 985 days


#5 posted 09-09-2015 05:44 AM

Ok, thanks for the advice. I think I’ll do as you suggest. I wondered though if I could just add glue to the crack as it is and then clamp it back together. From what I can tell there is no wood missing, it just split apart. I don’t think that I’ll actually do this, but I’m curious to know what people think of it. For this project I just want to make the board whole again, so cutting and re-gluing seems like the best route. But if I could just clamp back the crack, it would preserve the symmetry of the board. Again, I don’t think I’ll actually do it. But I am curious just for future reference. Thanks!

-- Whatever your hand finds to do, do it with all your might...

View bondogaposis's profile (online now)

bondogaposis

4020 posts in 1811 days


#6 posted 09-09-2015 01:03 PM

I wondered though if I could just add glue to the crack as it is and then clamp it back together.

If you don’t clean out the old glue in the crack it won’t hold. Best option is to rip it apart and re glue. I always use TB III on cutting boards after a few failures using TB II.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View Betsy's profile

Betsy

3338 posts in 3356 days


#7 posted 09-10-2015 12:52 AM

Agree with Bondo. The crack may appear clean but the glue has seeped into the fibers and will not make a secure surface to re-glue. Use the saw blade like a jointer and take light passes until you have cleaned up the joint. You’ll be surprised by shaving tiny bits at a time instead of just ripping what looks about right that you may not throw off your symmetry very much.

Good luck.

-- "Our past judges our present." JFK - 1962; American Heritage Magazine

View Spacehog's profile

Spacehog

65 posts in 985 days


#8 posted 09-10-2015 06:20 PM

Cool, thanks for all of the replies! I ended up cutting the board and it’s drying in the clamps now, so we’ll see…

-- Whatever your hand finds to do, do it with all your might...

View Rianni527's profile

Rianni527

1 post in 398 days


#9 posted 11-01-2015 02:39 AM

Hi Spacehog. Just wondering how the repair worked for you. I need to repair one as well.

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