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Finishing Textured Table

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Forum topic by IHateMayonnaise posted 09-07-2015 01:18 AM 640 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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IHateMayonnaise

5 posts in 460 days


09-07-2015 01:18 AM

Hello!

I’m in the final stages of my first working project—a dining room table made from reclaimed white oak. I’ve already applied a single treatment of Danish Oil for color, but I need something that will protect the surface. Now, from my research, there are a myriad of options available to me, however I am having a hard time finding information as to whether one method or another is ideal for my purposes. I left a lot of the original patina and kerf marks on the table, leaving it very textured, inconsistent, and uneven. I am worried about finishes that require sanding afterwards, because there is no way that I can realistically get into all the grooves, crevices, cracks etc that make this piece unique. It would be very saddening to me if the surface features were gunked up with excess finish! I also would like to preserve the overall dull-patina that currently exists on the unfinished top (I’ve noticed that many finishes leave a super-shiny finish).

From my research, I’ve found that some genre wipe-on poly would most likely be what I’m looking for, but I wanted to see what you guys think! Does anyone have any thoughts? Thanks!

-Wes

TableTexture


5 replies so far

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Woodendeavor

276 posts in 2073 days


#1 posted 09-07-2015 12:22 PM

i would be very careful wiping this piece. My fear would be you would get some of your applicator pad stuck in the texture. I would suggest using a small 4 inch roller.

Great looking table

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canadianchips

2360 posts in 2464 days


#2 posted 09-07-2015 01:59 PM

MIN WAX Poli Crylic, satin finish. Brush on first 2-3 coats, then I use foam applicator brush for final coats. The key to poly crylic is thin coats ! Sand lighlty in between coats as well.

-- "My mission in life - make everyone smile !"

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IHateMayonnaise

5 posts in 460 days


#3 posted 09-07-2015 04:30 PM



MIN WAX Poli Crylic, satin finish. Brush on first 2-3 coats, then I use foam applicator brush for final coats. The key to poly crylic is thin coats ! Sand lighlty in between coats as well.

- canadianchips

Thanks for the info! Should I just try to apply the finish as thin as possible? How many final coats do you apply? And for sanding, do you usually do this by hand, or with a power sander? I used a random orbital sander for the top, up to 180 grit. Thanks again!!

-Wes

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canadianchips

2360 posts in 2464 days


#4 posted 09-08-2015 12:24 AM

Apply the coats as thin as possible.
I use a small 1/4 pad sander lightly.220 grit
I have put 5-6 coats on !

-- "My mission in life - make everyone smile !"

View DMC1903's profile

DMC1903

254 posts in 1794 days


#5 posted 09-08-2015 05:01 AM

Nice build,
I have used Danish oil white oak and walnut, it’s great for adding color and filling pores by wet sanding.
Generally, I used Arm-a-Seal satin for the topcoat’s. It’s very easy to use and gives great results.

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