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Forum topic by MsDebbieP posted 2726 days ago 1749 views 0 times favorited 35 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MsDebbieP

18614 posts in 2743 days


2726 days ago

Question: if you were going to make a 6’ long rabbet joint, what piece of machinery would you use?

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)


35 replies so far

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Karson

34841 posts in 2983 days


#1 posted 2726 days ago

I’m more comfortable with a router. It is easy to setup and cut. Preferably in a router table. You didn’t state what was the board size. A long board might be hard to hold on a table.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

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Don

2599 posts in 2760 days


#2 posted 2726 days ago

I would use a router with some kind of guide, either home-built or commercial. Here’s a system I’ve used but don’t own.

-- CanuckDon "I just love small wooden boxes!" http://dpb-photography.me/

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scottb

3647 posts in 2910 days


#3 posted 2726 days ago

I’d have to use a comination of tablesaw, (with or without a dado set up) and a plane or chisel. (Not having a router quite yet.) I’ve planed many a board down with a small hand plane (having to get things to fit my old house) and I’d bet that it would go just as quickly as getting out the router and setting it up.

-- I am always doing what I cannot do yet, in order to learn how to do it. - Van Gogh -- http://blanchardcreative.etsy.com -- http://snbcreative.wordpress.com/

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MsDebbieP

18614 posts in 2743 days


#4 posted 2726 days ago

thank you so much for the information.

Karson: I’m not comfortable with any tool yet, so I want to try and start out “right” so my comfort level doesn’t involve processes that you guys would shake your head at!

Don, thanks for the picture: that really helps clarify.

Scott, what’s a “dado set-up” for a tablesaw??

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)

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Dusty

785 posts in 2739 days


#5 posted 2726 days ago

If you have access to a table saw and a daddo, that is what I use and would suggest. I get a lot better control with this. I have one table saw set up with a daddo blade , thus saving time breaking it down each time.

Dusty

-- Dusty

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MsDebbieP

18614 posts in 2743 days


#6 posted 2726 days ago

a daddo blade – i’ll have to look that up to see what on earth that is!
Thanks Dusty.

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)

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Obi

2213 posts in 2820 days


#7 posted 2726 days ago

I, too, would go with the table saw and dado blade set-up. Debbie, a Dado blade is sveral saw blades used on your table saw at the same time each blad being a little larger than 1/8” thick with the thickness usually totaling up to 13/16ths of an inch

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Don

2599 posts in 2760 days


#8 posted 2726 days ago

Debbie, I too, use Dado blades. My reason for answering as I did above, was that a router is a less expensive way to go if you don’t have a table-saw.

Here’s a good article on using dado blades.

-- CanuckDon "I just love small wooden boxes!" http://dpb-photography.me/

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MsDebbieP

18614 posts in 2743 days


#9 posted 2726 days ago

router: back-up plan
dado blade: first choice. Got it.

(Not that I’m making a 5’ box. I’m still struggling with a small one! We bought a router table and a jig set from a woodshow. Actually, we bought the jig set at a wood show – seemed easy enough for me to use, and then went to Sears and bought a router/router table. Well, we get the table home and give it a try and the blade and spacer thingy and the jig are chewed up by the router. Call the jig company and find out that the jig setup doesn’t work with models from Sears. DAH!
So we have to get an adapter (mistake number one—shoulda’ returned the Sears model).
The new jig stuff arrives in the mail; we set it all up and darned if the same thing didn’t happen again. Something or other moved on the Sears model, throwing everything out of sync.
Change of plans: remove the jiggy stuff and just try the router out. Rick takes a router bit from his router (that he bought at Sears years and years ago and has worked like a charm over and over again, ) and what happens? The bit breaks. Well, maybe the bit was old/flawed. So we buy a new router bit. Run it through a couple pieces of wood and the end of the bit broke off.
So now what? Is it the bit? Is it the table? Is it the router? Is it us?

Not sure of the cause but I do know what the effect is: no box building this month! And it will take a long time for me to get the courage up to tackle using a router table. I’m going to stick with my Dremel.

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)

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Don

2599 posts in 2760 days


#10 posted 2726 days ago

Debbie, this is a sad tale. Without really knowing the cause of these LO’s (remember Learning Opportunities), it’s difficult to comment. But my strong suspicion is that your technique needs honing.

In my opinion, there is no better place to learn the basic skills of woodworking than at a woodworking club, or perhaps equally good from a community college course. Woodworking tools are inherently dangerous. You need to learn the basics and when you do, your fears will be diminished.

A few rules about routers. A hand-held router should trim the outside edge of wood by moving it in a counter clock-wise direction, ie from left to right.

A router always needs a guide. In a router table this is the fence. (By the way – when in the table you move the work piece in a clockwise direction, ie. from right to left.) The router bit may also have a bearing guide. The guide controls the amount of wood that is being cut. It’s always best to take less than more. In other words, cut small amount until you have crept up to the size you want. When using the router as in the picture above, the fence or guide controls the direction of the cut, making it run true. If you are cutting a trench, or dado, start with either a smaller bit and work up to the desired width of the trench. Or, and perhaps this is more practical, start with a shallow cut and sneak up on the desired depth with multiple passes.

Using the router is a matter of control. You need to control the speed and direction of the wood passing the router bit, or the router-bit passing the wood, depending on whether it’s table mounted or hand held. You need to control the amount of wood being cut per pass. And you need to control the speed of the bit rotation, assuming it has a variable speed control.

My suspicion is that in one of these areas you were not controlling the process.

-- CanuckDon "I just love small wooden boxes!" http://dpb-photography.me/

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Karson

34841 posts in 2983 days


#11 posted 2726 days ago

Debbie: Take a look at John Lucas web site www.woodshopdemos.com You have to enter his site and at the bottom of a page you will see a Main Menu button go there and you might find something that will give you some clues on using a router table or a table saw. He is not doing videos but he does take you through the process of making some things.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

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MsDebbieP

18614 posts in 2743 days


#12 posted 2726 days ago

I appreciate all of these bits of information. I’ll be reviewing it over and over to really understand it all before I touch the router. Most of it sounds familiar, as Rick gave me some mini lessons when we bought the table.

I didn’t really watch what Rick was doing but since he’s been doing this for years I can only assume that he was “following the rules” (at least the rules of his old router).

thanks for the support and the advice.

- “router-wannabee” :) lol

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)

View Obi's profile

Obi

2213 posts in 2820 days


#13 posted 2726 days ago

Debbie,
I love the videos. My favorites are David Marks on D.I.Y.net.com/woodwoking. Here’s a Router video might find interesting

View dennis mitchell's profile

dennis mitchell

3994 posts in 2897 days


#14 posted 2726 days ago

Here is my rule of thumb I use a router on sheet goods and a daddo blade on lumber…and I’m not really sure why.

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oscorner

4564 posts in 2893 days


#15 posted 2725 days ago

Debbie, check out this site: http://www.woodmagazine.com/wood/category.jhtml?catref=wd2, I hope that the videos and techical articles will help you. I vote for the tablesaw and dado blade set as my preferred choice.

-- Jesus is Lord!

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