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Forum topic by Joans posted 09-04-2015 06:37 PM 706 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Joans

2 posts in 456 days


09-04-2015 06:37 PM

New to woodworking and new to the forum! I was hoping you all wouldn’t mind answering a few questions for me.

I am building a decorative centerpiece which will just be a 1 foot square by 2 foot tall hollowed out block of wood. I wanted to make it a butcher block type of pattern by alternating two different types of hardwood. I will cut the wood so that the middle 6 inches or so will be hollow with a little light that shines down through a colored lens and illuminates the tabletop around 4 short legs (I guess a lot of that is irrelevant). It will basically be a big hollow decorative butcher block.

My questions are:

1) Any thoughts on what would be 2 good types of hardwood to alternate to get a little differentiation in layered color, but not too much – and wood that won’t contract, expand or bow over time and pull apart (or can that even be a problem)?

2) Can I just sand the wood, coat it well with wood glue and clamp those layers together and have them bond permanently or will I need to countersink some wood screws or something between the layers? (I’ve never built anything and just used glue)

3) I had a friend that swears by this Sam Maloof hand rub finish that I was going to try, but I think I would like mine to come out a little darker brown to dark cherry. Would it be a bad idea to just put a coat of some type of stain on the wood first and then try the rub, or is there a better stain / protective combo that would last a very long time on a decorative item?

Thanks so much for any suggestions!


6 replies so far

View boisdearc's profile

boisdearc

44 posts in 796 days


#1 posted 09-04-2015 07:32 PM

The power of TB glue…. I recently glued up some 1 by 2s to make some American flags out of walnut and white oak and forgot I had planned to leave glue out of one pair. I used a wet rag and wiped the glue out real good several times good I thought… Then I re clamped over night.

The wet wiped off glue made a very strong bond that it took a hammer to snap them loose.. Hope you can understand my words.. Ron

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pmayer

864 posts in 2525 days


#2 posted 09-04-2015 07:34 PM

1) Any thoughts on what would be 2 good types of hardwood to alternate to get a little differentiation in layered color, but not too much – and wood that won’t contract, expand or bow over time and pull apart (or can that even be a problem)?

(PM) For a subtle variation in wood tones, I like to use cherry and walnut. These two woods work well together and are reasonably compatible from an expansion/contraction standpoint.

2) Can I just sand the wood, coat it well with wood glue and clamp those layers together and have them bond permanently or will I need to countersink some wood screws or something between the layers? (I’ve never built anything and just used glue)

(PM) You will need to get a good flat glue surface. If you have a friend with a jointer or planer to ensure that you get good glue surfaces, it would be better. But if you don’t have access to this, just be sure that you start with wood that is planed (not rough stock) and lightly sand the surface to promote a good glue bond. Use lots of clamps.

3) I had a friend that swears by this Sam Maloof hand rub finish that I was going to try, but I think I would like mine to come out a little darker brown to dark cherry. Would it be a bad idea to just put a coat of some type of stain on the wood first and then try the rub, or is there a better stain / protective combo that would last a very long time on a decorative item?

(PM) It depends what kind of wood that you want to use. If you use the wood species that I have suggested, you won’t need to stain to achieve the colors that you are describing. Personally, I would not use stain for this piece, but rather use woods whose tone provides what you want.

-- PaulMayer, http://www.vernswoodgoods.com

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MT_Stringer

2850 posts in 2691 days


#3 posted 09-04-2015 07:43 PM

Maple and walnut make a good contrast.

This cutting board is also maple/walnut and treated with mineral oil. Ready for action.

Glue and clamps only. No fasteners. This was a dry fit to see how the piece would look.

This makeup organizer was made from several pieces glued together after I had made some relief cuts.

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

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DrDirt

4167 posts in 3202 days


#4 posted 09-04-2015 08:47 PM

Maple and walnut are popular – - but I find (personal choice) that they are TOO different.

Walnut and Cherry – - or Cherry and Maple look nice together.

But you also shoudl consider the color of your table – - – the red may be too much?

-- 'Political correctness is fascism pretending to be manners' ~George Carlin

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CueballRosendaul

484 posts in 1600 days


#5 posted 09-05-2015 11:27 PM

Don’t be nervous about, Tia your time and think thru all the details and when you build it, do t be surprised if you have to scrap all your ideas and wing it.

Good contrast I’d suggest maple+walnut or cherry

Glue only, no screws. If it’s a complicated glue up, biscuits or dowels can help but not necessary. Just be sure that the surfaces are flat, covered with glue, and don’t squeeze all the glue out and starve the joint.

For finish, I’ve been on a real Danish oil kick lately. It leaves the wood with a natural texture and doesn’t protect 100% like a coat of poly. All types of polyurethane are basically layers of plastic and can detract from the feeling you’re trying to get with the piece. I think you should be able to tell time by the wear marks on a well made piece. Poly now seems like the plastic slip covers on a sofa.

-- Matt CueBall Rosendaul. I don't think I've ever had a cup of coffee that didn't have cat hair or sawdust in it.

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Joans

2 posts in 456 days


#6 posted 09-06-2015 04:36 AM

Awesome tips! Thanks so much you all!

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