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Forum topic by athomas5009 posted 09-04-2015 02:43 AM 745 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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athomas5009

293 posts in 1085 days


09-04-2015 02:43 AM

Topic tags/keywords: resource question tip

My father passed away about a month ago and consequently I ran into some extra money and I figured I’d set aside $3000 for some shop upgrades. I’ll list what I already have and what machines I had in mind.

(Current Machines) Cabinet saw w/50” Biese, 2.5hp plunge/fixed router, trim router, floor model drill press, 6” powermatic jointer, 13” riding planer, palm sander, the essential hand planes, cpl sets of cheap chisels and other common hand tools.

(Possible purchases) An 8” jointer. 6”ers come up sort too often. I’m looking at one of the grizzly 8” helical models. The dovetail model is 1000$ and the parallelogram is $1300. I only have experience with the DT style. Is the parallelogram feature worth the extra $300? Or should I just look for a used 8” straight knife for $500?

Thickness/drum sander – I was looking at the Grizz 16” double drum sander $1000. The Grizz 24” double drum sander $1700 Or the 24” Grizz double drum w/variable speed $2000. A 4th option would be picking up the 16” Grizz used w/a 2hp Grizz DC for $600. I’m leaning towards the last option but would like your thoughts.

I would use any remaining money to get a nice set of chisels, veritas MK honing jig, possible replacing my plane blades/irons with new hocks. A 5000grit and 12000grit shapton stone. Lastly a nice traditional woodworking bench with dogs and a few vices.

I know I can’t get them all for 3k$ unless I get all used machines but I gave you my thoughts and would like some help deciding. I’m mostly a hybrid woodworker but would like incorporating more hand work when it makes sense. I’m a hobbiest but would like to get into selling and taking occasional jobs.

-- Sometimes you're flush and sometimes you're bust, and when you're up, it's never as good as it seems, and when you're down, you never think you'll be up again, but life goes on.


14 replies so far

View daddywoofdawg's profile

daddywoofdawg

1010 posts in 1043 days


#1 posted 09-04-2015 05:52 AM

I’d get a used 8” straight knife for $500, 16” Grizz used w/a 2hp Grizz DC for $600,If it’s the open side type then you have a 32” sander.
A used tormex T-7 grinder 700.00
Build my own workbench under 300.00
new hocks blades are nice but do you hand plane alot?other wise maybe one for a block plane and one for a #4,those will be your most used planes.
So there you have 2100.00

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

3697 posts in 1733 days


#2 posted 09-04-2015 06:03 AM

I’m still leaning towards that PC drill press and that Jet 12” combo jointer/planer. Maybe after I get started with the wife’s new kitchen cabinets I can convince her to cut loose with the cash. She runs the checkbook!

View buildingmonkey's profile

buildingmonkey

242 posts in 1015 days


#3 posted 09-04-2015 07:14 AM

If you are in an area where there is considerable trading of used machines, that is very tempting. In my area, it would take a lifetime to collect a shop full of used equipment, unless you just are willing to accept anything. I have a parallelagram jointer, Grizzly go609 with a Byrd cutterhead, and it works just exactly right. Don’t need to shim, just easy to adjust, although it worked exactly right without any adjusting. Had a oliver before, never could get it adjusted exactly right. Sunhill oliver to clarify. Instead of a drum sander, I went with a small open end widebelt sander, works great. Get as large a dust collector as you can find used, sanders need lots of suction.

-- Jim from Kansas

View athomas5009's profile

athomas5009

293 posts in 1085 days


#4 posted 09-04-2015 10:02 AM

My wife is the money manager as well. I’m definetly not dumb enough to make a purchase of this size without her ok but I’m not really gonna leave the issue open for discussion. I rarely say anything if she buys things for herself or the kids, I don’t think it’s unreasonable to spend 3k$ on yourself when I’m also adding close to 20k$ to the general fund. It is my father after all.

I know if I died and left someone a lil something I would roll over in my grave if they didn’t get opportunity to buy a lil something to make them happy personally.

-- Sometimes you're flush and sometimes you're bust, and when you're up, it's never as good as it seems, and when you're down, you never think you'll be up again, but life goes on.

View athomas5009's profile

athomas5009

293 posts in 1085 days


#5 posted 09-04-2015 10:13 AM

If you look hard around here a cpl good deals on real machines Pop up about once a month. The 16” sander w/DC for around 650$ is still available. I’ve seen 8” jointers go for 500$ on occasion it would just be a waiting game.

I will probably go with the used 16” Grizz if it all checks out but I just didn’t want to regret not getting the 24” model new when I could have actually afforded it. Kind of like how most regret not getting an 8” jointer.

On the jointer I’m leaning more towards the new 8” helical parallelogram model. I really like the idea of better cut quality, hassle free knife changes but was unsure if the parallel feature made adjustments that much easier.

-- Sometimes you're flush and sometimes you're bust, and when you're up, it's never as good as it seems, and when you're down, you never think you'll be up again, but life goes on.

View tomsteve's profile

tomsteve

394 posts in 687 days


#6 posted 09-04-2015 11:24 AM

i strongly encourage ya to make a dust collector with upgraded filter and an air filter a priority.

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

1964 posts in 1456 days


#7 posted 09-04-2015 11:24 AM

Dust Collector if you do not have one.

The real question is what do you plan on making? That should guide your purchase.

View DrDirt's profile

DrDirt

4169 posts in 3210 days


#8 posted 09-04-2015 06:05 PM

All good choices – - I would get the grizzly jointer with spiral head.

Notice you have a 13 inch ‘Riding Planer’ gots to get me one of those :-) LOL

-- 'Political correctness is fascism pretending to be manners' ~George Carlin

View athomas5009's profile

athomas5009

293 posts in 1085 days


#9 posted 09-04-2015 07:39 PM

I’m getting a decent DC at minimum, I just want to make a wise decision on quality and price. I hoping I’ll be able to get away with a solid used 2hp model to save a lil cash. They pop up pretty regularly around here for 200$ or less. But my gut feeling is I’m gonna be advised to go with a 3hp model which is fine if it’s necessary for above average results. If I’m forced to go with a new 3hp DC I’ll probably run with the OEM filters for a little bit until I sell a cpl boxes/cutting boards to pay for the canister filter up grade. As far min performance necessary my shop is a 3car garage and ideally I’d like a direct run to the drum sander which will be close to the DC and have (2) 6” pvc runs one on each side that would have a cpl connection areas that would be closed when not in use. I would then run a short flex hose to the desired machine. I would only use it on my cabinet saw/router icombo set up, drum sander, jointer, planer and drill press. I never run more than one machine and already have a 6.5hp 2 stage shop vac to supplement as well.

I’m only a hobbiest I sell things here and there but mostly just gifts and home improvements. But I would like to sell more often to pay for a shop of only quality tools some day. I mostly make boxes, small cabinets and cutting boards ATM.

-- Sometimes you're flush and sometimes you're bust, and when you're up, it's never as good as it seems, and when you're down, you never think you'll be up again, but life goes on.

View Richard H's profile

Richard H

489 posts in 1148 days


#10 posted 09-04-2015 07:55 PM

I have used both dovetail and parallelogram jointers but have never had to adjust the tables on either kind. In operation they work exactly the same but if you ever have to adjust the jointer the parallelogram version is easier to work with from what I understand. My 6” dovetail jointer has never been off enough to worry about but if I did need to adjust it I would need to shim the table. It’s not prefect but I have never had any issues with the surfaces it makes so maybe I’m just not that picky. My biggest problem with my 6” jointer is it’s only 6” wide because as you said probably over half the lumber I buy is between 6-8” wide.

It sounds like you are but if you buy a drum sander a dust collector is a must especially the larger ones. That 24” double drum sander has two 4” ports if I remember right and the manual asks for something like 1600CFM at the tool.

Good luck.

View athomas5009's profile

athomas5009

293 posts in 1085 days


#11 posted 09-04-2015 08:50 PM

Just so we are all on the same page here I’m fairly confidant I’d be happy blowing my allowance on only the 3 new higher end machines and not regreat it.

But I would also like to save where it makes sense so I could maybe add to the lumber stash or parallel clamp collection.

-- Sometimes you're flush and sometimes you're bust, and when you're up, it's never as good as it seems, and when you're down, you never think you'll be up again, but life goes on.

View TheWoodenOyster's profile

TheWoodenOyster

1275 posts in 1403 days


#12 posted 09-05-2015 02:42 AM

If I had that much I would probably do some shop upgrades like install a split system or something so that the summers and winters would be more bearable. Don’t forget that option.

After that, I’d go all out on a big helical head planer. A big helical head jointer would be number 2- parallelogram is worth it IMO.

Don’t have a drum sander, so I’m clueless on that.

Don’t get a Veritas honing guide. They don’t work very well. I don’t want to steal the thread, so I’ll leave it at that.

-- The Wood Is Your Oyster

View InstantSiv's profile

InstantSiv

259 posts in 1063 days


#13 posted 09-05-2015 03:43 AM

I m a hobbiest but would like to get into selling and taking occasional jobs.

- athomas5009

In regards to shifting from a hobby to making money I would not spend any of that money just yet. Set aside the $3,000 for the time being. The first thing I would look into is:

1. What can you make right now with the tools you have(or with minimal purchasing of “USED” tools, only purchasing what you need in order to make what you want to sell.)
and
2. What actually sells out in the real world.

Once you find something that you can make, actually sells, and makes a profit then consider using some of the money towards growing.

That $3,000 would be better spent on other aspects of a business rather than on machinery.

View athomas5009's profile

athomas5009

293 posts in 1085 days


#14 posted 09-05-2015 07:18 AM

Well I wouldn’t really refer to my thoughts as a business at this point even though that would be awesome. I was thinking more along the lines of selling cutting boards, jewelry boxes and other popular craft show items around the holidays to give me the extra cash and an excuse to buy tools like a Domino or a 5hp clearvue tools that aren’t a must but really make everything easier and fun.

Oh and I have a small update. I actually spoke with the seller of the used DS/DC combo.he said both machines are in great shape. Claims he bought them both 15yrs ago to build his on kitchen cabinets and since then he’s gotten away from woodworking and just want to free up space. With only one big project and a few hobby / smaller stuff I sound like they both have plenty of life left in them

-- Sometimes you're flush and sometimes you're bust, and when you're up, it's never as good as it seems, and when you're down, you never think you'll be up again, but life goes on.

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