LumberJocks

pofessional advice needed

  • Advertise with us

« back to Designing Woodworking Projects forum

Forum topic by sprunk86 posted 09-03-2015 05:08 PM 535 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View sprunk86's profile

sprunk86

2 posts in 461 days


09-03-2015 05:08 PM

Hello. I have an idea for a type of engineered hardwood flooring. Instead of the planks having straight edges, they would have curved edges and form a repeating pattern. This is something I want to build myself or with the help of a manufacturing company, and eventually build a business around it.

I have been visiting flooring retailers in my area hoping they could put me in touch with someone who has knowledge of engineered flooring manufacturing process. So far no one has been able to help, so I’m turning to the internet for help :-)

I imagine engineered hardwood is laminated in large sheets. So my idea was to use a water jet to cut the design then add a tongue and groove with a router.

Here are some question i have…

-The core in engineered hardwood – I have seen some brands with just a single layer of some type of fiberboard, and other brands with multiple layers of cross-grained veneer? What is the advantage of one over the other?

-What type of glue do they use?

-What’s the maximum thickness of cut that can be achieved using the rotary cut veneer method, I would like to use a 1/4” wear layer.

-Should I be worried about swelling from the water in the waterjet cutting process?

-Would it be possible to impregnate the wood (a resin maybe, silicon) to minimize dimensional instability due to humidity fluctuations?

Any questions or comments you may have are welcome.

I’ve included a picture of a few sketches to give you an idea of what I have in mind.


5 replies so far

View IHRedRules's profile

IHRedRules

92 posts in 940 days


#1 posted 09-03-2015 05:19 PM

I would recommend that you do some research on patents, to see if there is already something out there that might have an impact on your ideas before you spend a lot of time on this.

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3553 posts in 1231 days


#2 posted 09-03-2015 05:24 PM

I think whatever pattern is used must be in a way that eliminates or minimize waste. So, once a cut is made, the board is turned around and cut in a way to match the previous cut. However, the patterns you have posted can be created wooden tiles using CNC. The grooves or spaces resulting from the blade could resemble spacing between the two patterns. This would eliminate gluing and movement of the boards.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3553 posts in 1231 days


#3 posted 09-03-2015 05:54 PM


On March 25th, 2010 in Washington DC, Czar Floors was awarded The Best Floor of The Year in CNC/Laser Cut category.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View sprunk86's profile

sprunk86

2 posts in 461 days


#4 posted 09-03-2015 10:48 PM

Hello mrjinx007, I am having trouble understanding what you mean. Could you explain it in a little more detail, I am familiar with CNC, so go ahead and use technical terms if you wish. Also what is the actual cutting method you would recommend?

edit: Just noticed it said laser cut in the description, how would they get rid of the burn marks though.

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3553 posts in 1231 days


#5 posted 09-04-2015 12:44 AM

I believe the burn marks are the defined lines you see. I am just guessing at that but it makes sense to me. I bet you can call them and inquire:

Are the designs painted on the wood surface?

Not at All. We do not use paint to create inlay designs. Every pattern is made up from different wood species, carefully matched by the designer to achieve the desired color effect, inlaid. From the picture below, you can see the edge of the B5 border. Top wood layer has different woods cut and inlaid to form a pattern. It is mounted on the plywood backer for 3/4” thick product.

-- earthartandfoods.com

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com