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Band Saw Blades dulling too fast

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Forum topic by MichiganKeel posted 09-03-2015 01:38 PM 1059 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MichiganKeel

14 posts in 496 days


09-03-2015 01:38 PM

Topic tags/keywords: laguna blade dulling bandsaw

I’ve got a new Laguna 14/12 bandsaw. I had never used a bandsaw before so I researched all I could before turning this one on. I believe I have it tuned well as the blade tracks true and I get really good rips and cross cuts. My issue is in resawing which is the primary reason I bought the saw. I seem to only be able to get a few board feet of stock resawn before the blade dulls and I end up pushing too hard to get the board through and eventually it burns the wood if I keep going. I’ve tried 3 different blades, two Laguna (5/8 and 3/4 proforce and shearforce) and a 3/4 timber wolf. They all start out great but dull very quickly (10 board feet or so) even when I feed the stock painfully slowly. I’m willing to spend more on a blade but the carbide tipped blades I find are wider than 3/4 (the max for this saw). Before I continue replacing blades for every project can someone tell me if this wear is normal or do you have any other tips for what may be going wrong?

-- I keep cutting and cutting and it's STILL too short


14 replies so far

View TheGreatJon's profile

TheGreatJon

295 posts in 697 days


#1 posted 09-03-2015 01:47 PM

I’m certainly no expert, but that is not normal wear. Are you resawing dirty wood, like barnwood or green wood?

Also, if you have a dremel with the little cut-off tool, you can resharpen blades pretty easily. The low TPI on resaw blades makes it a pretty quick job to go through and give each tooth a little touch-up. I wouldn’t say “good as new”, but near enough that it is well worth the effort. Mattias Wendel has a video on youtube about sharpening his blades. It’s incredibly straightforward, but I find a quick youtube video is always invaluable when you’re venturing into new territory.

-- This is not the signature line you are looking for.

View cabmaker's profile

cabmaker

1507 posts in 2272 days


#2 posted 09-03-2015 01:53 PM

sounds like a blade selection issue.

What tpi are you using ?

View MichiganKeel's profile

MichiganKeel

14 posts in 496 days


#3 posted 09-03-2015 02:05 PM

The wood is soft maple from a mill. It’s been jointed and planed. The blades have all been 3TPI.
I should mention that I did cut a Claro Walnut board 12” x 16” and made three resaws in that before noticing wear. The maple seems to be more difficult. I cut an 8” board and only got 12 inches in before I could feel the cut change.
Having not used a bandsaw before I wonder if there’s anywhere else the blade could be wearing? I’m not sure what “normal” sound should be and thought it was running a little loud. Some of that seems to be from the ceramic bearings and I’ve looked for other sources of friction inside but am not seeing anything obvious.

-- I keep cutting and cutting and it's STILL too short

View kaerlighedsbamsen's profile

kaerlighedsbamsen

1177 posts in 1176 days


#4 posted 09-03-2015 02:10 PM

Hmm guess the obvious next question would be if the blade guides are set correctly and not touching the teeth?

-- "Do or Do not. There is no try." - Yoda

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

1752 posts in 602 days


#5 posted 09-03-2015 02:12 PM

A little more info. may help diagnose your problems. I don’t do any resawing but I have done quite a bit of research on BS blades so may be able to help some with that. I’m sure others who are experienced in resawing will be able to chime in on technique as well.

First, how many TPI on your blades? The # of teeth and gullet geometry will have a very big effect on whether or not saw dust can be removed from the cut fast enough. I think generally that 2-3 TPI is preferred for resawing. From what I understand, 3/4” blades should be sufficient for any resawing you’re likely to be doing and even 1/2” is wide enough for most as long as tooth geometry is suited to the application and the BS is tuned properly.

What kind of wood are you cutting and how thick/tall is it? Hardness of wood will obviously affect how quickly teeth dull. The height of the wood will determine how many teeth are in the cut at one time and how much sawdust is gathering in the gullet. In turn, your blade speed and feed rate will have to be such that sawdust is effectively ejected for the blade you’re using.

So, a bit more information may help you get some better suggestions.

I’ll also recommend Mattais Wendel’s site that TheGreatJon pointed you to. He has a lot of great stuff on his site and I’ve used his method to effectively sharpen my BS blades a couple of times.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View MichiganKeel's profile

MichiganKeel

14 posts in 496 days


#6 posted 09-03-2015 02:15 PM



Hmm guess the obvious next question would be if the blade guides are set correctly and not touching the teeth?

- kaerlighedsbamsen

Honestly the first time I used the saw they were not set correctly and I trashed that blade. I’ve been quite careful since then.

-- I keep cutting and cutting and it's STILL too short

View putty's profile

putty

999 posts in 1070 days


#7 posted 09-03-2015 02:23 PM

I have the same saw, I had a Bi-Metal blade made at a local shop. It is sharp and has not dulled at all. Mine is 1/2” 3tpi

-- Putty

View MichiganKeel's profile

MichiganKeel

14 posts in 496 days


#8 posted 09-03-2015 02:35 PM



I have the same saw, I had a Bi-Metal blade made at a local shop. It is sharp and has not dulled at all. Mine is 1/2” 3tpi

- putty


What kind of shop makes blades. I went to a sharpener who would weld one to length but he couldn’t get stock in 3TPI

-- I keep cutting and cutting and it's STILL too short

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

828 posts in 685 days


#9 posted 09-03-2015 04:39 PM

Based on your info, something is dulling the blade besides the wood. Guides would be the #1 suspect, but you have dealt with that. I’d look for any place the blade may be contacting the saw cabinet. It will be hard to spot and probably only makes contact when the blade is under load.
I had this happen when using a 1-1/4” resaw blade (the max for my saw). The blade cut great for a few logs before it really started to slow down. I finally found a spot on the lower door that had some scratches, but the blade didn’t make contact when I spun it by hand. After convincing myself that was what dulled my blade, I corrected the condition (spaced the door a tad) and the identical replacement blade is still running strong after dozens of logs.

If you can, have a magnifying glass close look at the teeth of a dull blade. Flat tips is a sure indication of the problem I had.

View David Taylor's profile

David Taylor

326 posts in 550 days


#10 posted 09-04-2015 01:33 AM

If you want to go the carbide tip route, Highland Woodworking has 1/2” blades – http://www.highlandwoodworking.com/lenox-tri-master-carbide-tipped-12-bandsaw-blades.aspx?A=1314&B=28

-- Learn Relentlessly

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

690 posts in 1261 days


#11 posted 09-04-2015 03:29 AM

Did you know the Tri master is a metal cutting blade,It will cut wood but I thought it was too slow for my liking.The good part is the .025 band will work on small wheels.The bad part is if you bend a tooth is a hard hit on the wallet.

View daddywoofdawg's profile

daddywoofdawg

1010 posts in 1038 days


#12 posted 09-04-2015 05:25 AM

https://youtu.be/wGbZqWac0jU
https://youtu.be/oxYzKG9fghU
I had timber wolf blades on mine and they dulled quick so I bought these and getting better mileage. supercutbandsaw.com
Your blades should be a folded dollar bill away from your blade guides,left,right,and rear,also the guides under the table same thing,the teeth of the blade should be in front of the guides,not inline or behind them,the un-toothed part of the blade should ride on the crown of the wheels,the blade shouldn’t flex more than a 1/8” left or right from rest.

View tom in indy's profile

tom in indy

41 posts in 1810 days


#13 posted 09-04-2015 01:11 PM

From my experience you probably have guides misadjusted or you are binding the blade, both would cause excess heat and take the set/temper out of the blades causing them to “wear out”.

table/blade not at 90deg. rip fence not 90deg to table, fence not parallel to blade, again any/all of these causing excess heat….

attached is a link to a video by Alex Snodgrass from Carter Products. it goes through band saw setup.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wGbZqWac0jU

you might want to look at some of the info from Stockroom Supply / Paul Moore too.

just my $0.02

tom

View putty's profile

putty

999 posts in 1070 days


#14 posted 09-04-2015 01:57 PM

What kind of shop makes blades. I went to a sharpener who would weld one to length but he couldn’t get stock in 3TPI

Oops, mine is 4 tpi It does an excellent job resawing. My saw shop buys the raw stock then cuts and welds to length.

-- Putty

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