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Mounting Delta T2 fence to Crafstman table saw - Need help!

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Forum topic by bues0022 posted 1723 days ago 2632 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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bues0022

215 posts in 1764 days


1723 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: question

I’ve done a lot of reading, and looked at this website extensively: http://www.instructables.com/id/Retrofitting_A_Delta_T2_Fence_to_a_Craftsman_Table/ yet I’m still having a pretty rough time mounting my new fence. It seems like I just don’t have enough material to drill into. I have the plastic adjustable screws on the fence up almost all the way. I have the top of the rail 13/16” from the top of the table (as per the instructions say) which on his instructions made the fence ride about 1/16” above the table. Well, mine rides a good 1/8” up, which seems like an aweful lot. As you can see from the pictures, I feel if I drill new holes in the rails (or table) I’ll end up with almost zero wall thickness near the edge which could lead to failure down the road from the bolt pulling out. I have some pictures attached to show what I’m worried about. Please help!
saw and fence

hole on left side of rail

hole on right side of rail

picture from behind showing the relative offset

height of fence above table

-- Ryan -- Maple Grove, MN


14 replies so far

View riverrat's profile

riverrat

19 posts in 1983 days


#1 posted 1723 days ago

When I installed the Delta fence on my Craftsman, I redrilled the holes on the saw and extensions closer to the bottom so that the fence and rail would be lower. The top of the front angle iron should be 3/4” from top of the saw, the rear should be 5/8”. I have had no problem with this and I’ve ran a lot of material through that saw. When you mount the new rails, you will find it easier if you start with the center hole. I also mounted my fence shifted to the right to increase the rip capacity.

-- Muffleman

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bues0022

215 posts in 1764 days


#2 posted 1723 days ago

I”m going to mount my fence regular, I actually don’t have the room in my garage to have the fence shifted over. Maybe someday I can remount it in a different location.

So you drilled on your saw table and fences instead of drilling into the rails? Why is that? It looks like on the table the material of the casting is thicker where the holes are to provide extra support. How much lower did you have to redrill? Mine will be awfully close to the edges I think.

I I went out and checked on some dimensions a few minutes ago. It looks like if I have the holes lined up vertically (holes on the table and rails) and have the plastic screws as high up as possible, the fence rides 3/16” above the table. I’ve been assuming that I’d be drilling the rails, however, and those holes have the countersink that makes the holding power less. I’ll go see what it looks like for drilling the table instead.

-- Ryan -- Maple Grove, MN

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riverrat

19 posts in 1983 days


#3 posted 1723 days ago

That’s why I drilled the saw instead of the rails. As you stated the rail holes are countersunk for the hardware that is included in your fence. I did not want to have a clearance problem with the fence movement clearing bolts. Yes, the holes are close to the bottom, I was concerned with that as well but it has not been an issue. When you get this installed you will love the improvement over the pos Craftsman fence, just make sure everything is alligned properly. I’d post a photo of mine but I can’t figure out how to do it. I’m computer illeterate.

-- Muffleman

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ajosephg

1840 posts in 2165 days


#4 posted 1723 days ago

Are you aware that the sides of the fence (the part that runs across the table) can be adjusted down (or up) so that they just clear the tabletop?

Remove the fence and turn it upside down. You’ll see about 6 hex nuts. Slightly loosen the nuts and the sides of the fence can move up or down. Replace fence and adust sides so they are about 1/16” above the table at all points of the fence’s travel, remove fence and tighten nuts.

Delta doesn’t mention this in their instructions – go figure.

-- Joe

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riverrat

19 posts in 1983 days


#5 posted 1723 days ago

I didn’t know that you could make that up and down adjustment, the holes still have to be drilled though since the Delta hole pattern is different than Craftsman. I am aware of the 6 bolts though, I am considering modifying my fence to have a slider on it similar to an Altendorf, do you think that’s a feasible option?

-- Muffleman

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bues0022

215 posts in 1764 days


#6 posted 1723 days ago

Thanks for the tip on the bolts! That was what I needed to get it to work out.

-- Ryan -- Maple Grove, MN

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ajosephg

1840 posts in 2165 days


#7 posted 1723 days ago

Muffleman
I know nothing about the Altendorf except that it looks like megabucks.

Concern one is that the Delta fence is not designed to withstand upward force, as the back side of the fence just rests on the guide rail with its own weight. Any significant upard force could possibly damage the the T Square clamping device or the front tube.

-- Joe

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TheDane

3659 posts in 2267 days


#8 posted 1723 days ago

Muffleman—The Delta fence is not unique in this design … I have a ShopFox that functions the same way.

Given the weight of the ShopFox (steel, not aluminum) the fence itself is heavy enough that I’m not at all worried about any upward force lifting the fence. Isn’t the Delta T2 also steel?

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

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riverrat

19 posts in 1983 days


#9 posted 1722 days ago

Yes, it’s a steel core, with plastic (nylon?) sides, but I don’t think upwards force is an issue. I have a delta sliding table attached on the left of the saw. I want to have the ability to slide the left side of the Delta fence forward and backwards to adjust for binding on crosscut pieces to avoid kickback as is done on the Altendorf and other expensive saws. I need to design something using the bolts on the fence to allow the side of the fence to slide. Maybe I could rout in a key slot in it and make some sort of clamping mechanism that loosens and tigntens on a cam assembly. I’m looking for ideas and suggestions?

-- Muffleman

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ajosephg

1840 posts in 2165 days


#10 posted 1722 days ago

I’m not comprehending what you want to do. Conventional wisdom is to never use the fence when crosscutting (to prevent kickback).

Maybe a sketch or ??

-- Joe

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riverrat

19 posts in 1983 days


#11 posted 1722 days ago

When using a slididng table attachment on the left, there is another fence assembly that is adjustable both in the length of the fence and the angle to the blade. It is possible to use the normal fence on the tablesaw as a stop for short or repetitive cuts. However, that fence needs to slide so you adjust the end of the fence to prevent the kickback that you mention.

-- Muffleman

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ajosephg

1840 posts in 2165 days


#12 posted 1722 days ago

When I want to make repetitive crosscuts I clamp an “L” shaped wood block (legs are about 6 inches) to the front of the fence. Nothing fancy like what you’re talking about but it works.

In order to make sure there can be absolutely no chance of a kickback the distance between the blade and the fence should be greater than the diagonal of the cutoff.

-- Joe

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riverrat

19 posts in 1983 days


#13 posted 1722 days ago

Joe,

I have been clamping to my fence for a stop, I’m want to be able to change settings faster than manual clamping. I’m guess I’m trying to get the features of a $20,000 saw without the expense… also trying to figure a way to put some type of scoring attachment for melamine.

-- Muffleman

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ajosephg

1840 posts in 2165 days


#14 posted 1722 days ago

Ah So. Let us know when you come up with a great idea so we can steal it from you. ;)

I’m still learning how to cut a straight line perpendicular to some other edge, but if I think of something I’ll let you know.

-- Joe

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