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Forum topic by TheWoodenOyster posted 09-02-2015 03:33 AM 885 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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TheWoodenOyster

1275 posts in 1398 days


09-02-2015 03:33 AM

Topic tags/keywords: shop floor

Hey guys,

I am about to install a wood shop floor in my garage. It’ll be 2×4s on their sides at about 12” on center with 3/4 ply over the top. Do I need to worry about vibration? I am wondering if I am going to have vibration issues with machines on top of it or bounce-back issues on my workbench.

Any info regarding this topic is appreciated. Also, any other tips or tricks for the wood floor installation would be appreciated.

Thanks,

-- The Wood Is Your Oyster


18 replies so far

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DocSavage45

7703 posts in 2305 days


#1 posted 09-02-2015 06:45 AM

Are you planning to do electrical under it? too narrow for dust collection unless you run metal ducts. If your concerned you can make it 16 inch on center? Are you going to glue and screw the sleepers.

The concrete should absorb some of the vibration and maybe styrofoam between the sleepers if budget allows.

I’d like to see what others might say.

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

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crank49

3981 posts in 2434 days


#2 posted 09-02-2015 10:00 AM

Not quite the same, but my shop floor joists are on 12 inch centers with Advantec 3/4 inch OSB as the surface. I plan to put hardwood or laminate over it some day, but as it is I have no vibration issues. Solid as a rock.

-- Michael: Hillary has a long list of accomplishments, though most DAs would refer to them as felonies.

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benchbuilder

265 posts in 1913 days


#3 posted 09-02-2015 10:32 AM

I had ply over a slab floor and never had any issues. But you have to put down some type of insulation under the ply and then a layer of plastic over that, just as you would a wall in a house.You need to use treater 2×4s on the floor, i used 16” centers with 3/4” tounge and grove ply. Also.make sure your sealed all around the edges to keep out invader as mice and such. Yes, if you do it right its a lot better than the cement floor. I never had any pronlem. As stated above, you can run electrc and air under it to, but seal it well where they come up through the floor. I now have a shop with epoxy on the floor, here when i moved in, but i will change that,not good for a
shop. Good luck.

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Goatlocker

58 posts in 1435 days


#4 posted 09-02-2015 02:05 PM

Dumb question here but why is a cement floor bad other than hard and unforgiving which can be fixed with matts where needed?

-- All tyranny needs to gain a foothold is for people of good conscience to remain silent - Thomas Jefferson

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JoshNZ

53 posts in 532 days


#5 posted 09-02-2015 02:19 PM



Dumb question here but why is a cement floor bad other than hard and unforgiving which can be fixed with matts where needed?

- Goatlocker

I was about to ask the same question. My shop is smooth concrete floor. Sure easy to clean and i haven’t hit my head on it yet… :S

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TheWoodenOyster

1275 posts in 1398 days


#6 posted 09-02-2015 11:30 PM

Doc – no electrical or dust collection in it. I am going to ramset the 2×4s to the concrete. Not planning on gluing it – do you think that is necessary?

Benchbuilder – I am getting all my materials for free, so I can’t be too picky. No treated wood and I am not going to insulate – I live in Texas, so if anything, I think the cool slab helps with shops temps in the summer. Not too worried about winter. I am going to put a layer of poly sheeting to limit moisture absorbance.

Goat and Josh – I’ve worked on a concrete floor with mats and I don’t like it. Like I said, the materials are free other than about $50. I’m ok with that to experiment with a wood floor. I wouldn’t do this for $500, but for cheap I am willing to spend a weekend putting it in to see if I like it.

-- The Wood Is Your Oyster

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DocSavage45

7703 posts in 2305 days


#7 posted 09-02-2015 11:44 PM

In hind sight, which is always 20×20 I would run electrical conduit with flush floor boxes. Wood wants to move. the nails can loosen over time.

Free is good, and unless you move it’s going to be around a lifetime?

Insulation in the floor is like insulation in the walls. Reduces noise which makes good neighbors? The wood vibrates more than concrete.

That being said…like my old farmer friend who mentored me when I lived in Arkansas…”A man’s gotta do what a man’s gotta do.

Good luck

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

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TheWoodenOyster

1275 posts in 1398 days


#8 posted 09-03-2015 12:23 AM

Thanks for the response Doc.

Maybe I’ll grab a few tubes of liquid nail. That’ll be cheap. Maybe I’ll pull up the floors and insulate when I do the walls and the ceiling. At this point, with no wall and ceiling insulation, the place is going to be a veritable coffee can full of pennies no matter what. Sorry neighbors.

Your insight is helpful.

-- The Wood Is Your Oyster

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DocSavage45

7703 posts in 2305 days


#9 posted 09-03-2015 01:21 AM

As they say in MN “You Betcha!” Maybe you can give me some feedback on my forum post on using Ash that I have for furniture making?

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

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TheWoodenOyster

1275 posts in 1398 days


#10 posted 09-03-2015 03:25 AM

You got it.

-- The Wood Is Your Oyster

View crank49's profile

crank49

3981 posts in 2434 days


#11 posted 09-03-2015 03:40 AM

If the sleepers are not pressure treated, then I’d put the thickest layer of polyethelene I could get under the sleepers to prevent moisture wicking into them from the concrete. In which case you will have to either accept a floating floor, no connection to the concrete, or do the ramset thing.

-- Michael: Hillary has a long list of accomplishments, though most DAs would refer to them as felonies.

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Jim Finn

2409 posts in 2385 days


#12 posted 09-03-2015 11:40 AM

I am in west Texas. A High desert. I mad an uneven garage floor so I covered the floor of the stall I used as my shop with plywood over 2/4’s. on edge. Made the floor flat. I did not screw the two byes to the concrete but did screw the tongue and grove ply to the two byes. Worked great. I have since sold that house and moved, so I just unscrewed the ply and moved the floor to my new shop. I returned the old garage to garage use and sold the house. I learned long ago that nothing is permanent. I use screws instead of nails for this reason. I place my two byes 16” apart except where I knew my table saw (my heaviest piece of equipment) would be. I spaced the two byes 12” there. No vibration issues and a great floor to work on.

-- "You may have your PHD but I have my GED and my DD 214"

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TheWoodenOyster

1275 posts in 1398 days


#13 posted 09-03-2015 12:30 PM

Crank – I was thinking about putting the poly under the 2×4s. I think I’ll do that.

Jim – Interesting that yours just floats. I am planning on screwing the ply down to the 2×4s, but I think I’m going to have to nail the 2×4s to the floor. I don’t have a hammer drill, and it is cheaper to buy a ramset for $25 than buy a hammer drill. Plus hammer drilling 200SF of flooring sleepers into concrete sounds pretty bad…

-- The Wood Is Your Oyster

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cabmaker

1507 posts in 2272 days


#14 posted 09-03-2015 02:23 PM

I have to go along with the floating floor situation.

Several things here: you’ll need a proper gun to shoot fasteners which will make the cost of a hammer drill meaningless. unless you buy the cheap slide hammer type. (good luck on completing the job.}

If you do ramset it, use pins without washers so you can easily countersink to accept plywood flooring….which may negate its purpose anyway

You could use the cut nails which are made for this situation

If your existing floor is within some reasonable tolerance, there is really no need for attaching the 2×4 s to the concrete at all

screwing the ply to the 2×4s without taking another measures is the way i would go, gravity and weight will take care of the rest.

JB

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buildingmonkey

242 posts in 1011 days


#15 posted 09-03-2015 04:55 PM

If you just nail a 2×2 around the edge, and lay your 2×4’s flat, and then screw or tack the ply to the 2×2 edging, your floor will not move. Treated lumber does not move when it is in the dark, just moves around in sunlight, so you should be good. Personally, think I would just use 6mil plastic under the 2×4’s and use untreated 2×4’s. They are straighter, and keeping them dry will keep you from getting any deterioration. And even going 19 plus on center would be good, as your 2×4’s are 3 1/2 ” wide, so less than 16’ between them. Lay some short pieces under your machines between the 2×4’s.

-- Jim from Kansas

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