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No Bandsaw, what's your preferred half lap technique?

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Forum topic by savan posted 08-27-2015 02:23 PM 1000 views 0 times favorited 21 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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savan

97 posts in 1853 days


08-27-2015 02:23 PM

I’ve found myself building some cases lately and to save money I’ll use a 1×4 skeleton on the interior instead of a full piece of plywood.

For example if the cabinet has 2 columns of drawers I’ll use a rectangular 1×4 frame instead of plywood in the center to mount the drawer runners/slides on. The frame would be assembled using half laps. These are kind of a pain without a bandsaw.

What’s your favorite alternative to the bandsaw when cutting half laps?


21 replies so far

View jmartel's profile

jmartel

6565 posts in 1611 days


#1 posted 08-27-2015 02:24 PM

Tablesaw with a blade with a flat top grind.

Handsaw with a chisel and a router plane when I don’t feel like making noise.

I don’t use the bandsaw for half-laps.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3930 posts in 1954 days


#2 posted 08-27-2015 02:26 PM

I also use the TS, normally with the dado blade.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View boisdearc's profile

boisdearc

44 posts in 797 days


#3 posted 08-27-2015 02:39 PM

Set the TS blade to correct depth….. If you don’t have a dado blade, you could make several passes with the miter gauge. Hope this helps.. Ron

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Richard

1898 posts in 2151 days


#4 posted 08-27-2015 02:49 PM



I also use the TS, normally with the dado blade.

- Fred Hargis


+1 Best way to do it , never used a Band saw for them either.

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Richard H

489 posts in 1142 days


#5 posted 08-27-2015 03:04 PM

I have never liked the surface I get from any of my tablesaw blades. The edges of the joint always look rough to me. It might be my dado stack and more expensive ones might give better results but the under $100 set I have does not. What I do is use the dado stack to get close than use a shoulder or rabbiting block plane to clean up the cheeks. You don’t have to remove much to turn a rough edge into a smooth perfect fit. It has the added bonus of not having to fuss with the settings so much as you only have to get close and remove the exact amount you want 1/1000 of a inch at a time.

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Mattyboy

50 posts in 539 days


#6 posted 08-27-2015 04:16 PM

Agree with JMartel. Handsaw and router plane. When you mark your saw cuts with a knife line, it’s very accurate.

-- Matt, Northern CA

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Richard

1898 posts in 2151 days


#7 posted 08-27-2015 07:39 PM



Agree with JMartel. Handsaw and router plane. When you mark your saw cuts with a knife line, it s very accurate.

- Mattyboy

Paul Sellers style , that man is the best I have seen at doing anything like this with a Knife Line and Chisel and or Handsaw .

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

3019 posts in 1259 days


#8 posted 08-27-2015 07:46 PM

A router plane? What percentage of woodworkers, do you think, have a router plane? I’m guessing < 10%, maybe < 5%.

Assuming the OP is part of the vast unwashed who don’t own a router plane, I would second the table saw with standard blade or dado—it can be cleaned up with a chisel.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View JayT's profile

JayT

4772 posts in 1672 days


#9 posted 08-27-2015 07:51 PM



A router plane? What percentage of woodworkers, to you think, have a router plane?

- CharlesA

Any of them with a chisel and a scrap of wood can have a router plane.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B_2a_FwjAgk

That said, I’ll keep my Stanley #71, thank you. It gets used a lot and is the handiest of all the joinery planes.

-- "Good judgement is the result of experience. A lot of experience is the result of poor judgement."

View Mosquito's profile

Mosquito

8074 posts in 1753 days


#10 posted 08-27-2015 07:55 PM

+1 on handsaw and router plane from me as well.

-- Mos - Twin Cities, MN - http://www.youtube.com/MosquitoMods - http://www.TheModsquito.com

View theoldfart's profile

theoldfart

8078 posts in 1912 days


#11 posted 08-27-2015 07:57 PM

Mitre box and chisel. Gives you the ability to do repeatable cuts accurately.

No noise, not much sawdust, and a relaxed pace. You can see your cuts as your doing them.

-- "With every tool obtained, there is another that is needed" DonW ( Kevin )

View jmartel's profile

jmartel

6565 posts in 1611 days


#12 posted 08-27-2015 09:11 PM


A router plane? What percentage of woodworkers, do you think, have a router plane? I m guessing < 10%, maybe < 5%.

Assuming the OP is part of the vast unwashed who don t own a router plane, I would second the table saw with standard blade or dado—it can be cleaned up with a chisel.

- CharlesA

He asked how we did it. I gave my answer.

You can still cut it by hand and use a chisel for half-laps. No router plane needed. It does make it easier to get a level surface parallel to the faces of the boards, however.

If the OP is a typical all power-tool woodworker, then they can use a tablesaw and dado blade, flat top blade, or a standard blade and clean it up with a powered router.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

View BJODay's profile

BJODay

512 posts in 1404 days


#13 posted 08-27-2015 09:20 PM

I have used a router table and a band saw. The router table gave a very clean surface, but you have to watch for tear-out. The BS was much faster, felt safer to me and did a good job if I didn’t rush it.

I hate using dado sets on my table saw. I’m a chicken that way but I would rather work slower and feel safer. I would guess the fastest and probably most efficient method is a dado set.

BJ

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

3019 posts in 1259 days


#14 posted 08-27-2015 09:21 PM


He asked how we did it. I gave my answer.
- jmartel

Fair enough.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

14940 posts in 2151 days


#15 posted 08-27-2015 09:41 PM

Two ways to do these on the tablesaw: Dado blade or 2 cuts using the miter gauge and tenoning jig.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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