LumberJocks

Wiring Magnetic light(110v) directly to 220v Bandsaw???

  • Advertise with us

« back to Safety in the Woodworking Shop forum

Forum topic by Xrayguy posted 1717 days ago 2885 views 0 times favorited 23 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Xrayguy's profile

Xrayguy

38 posts in 2014 days


1717 days ago

I have a Grizzly 17’ G0513 bandsaw running at 220v, i also have a aftermarket magnetic light that runs on 110 that i have to plug into a seperate circuit everytime i want some light close by, is there any way to wire the light into the bandsaw wiring??

-- Brad J


23 replies so far

View lew's profile

lew

9937 posts in 2351 days


#1 posted 1717 days ago

Your 220v for the saw will probably be wired with a red, black, white and green wire. You can tap into the red and white wire (or black and white wire) for 110v. You should also tap into the green (ground) wire for safety.

The red and the black wire each carry 110v when compared to the white wire giving you 220v across them.

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View Xrayguy's profile

Xrayguy

38 posts in 2014 days


#2 posted 1717 days ago

grizzly uses a 3 wire system, black white and green, does that make a difference?

-- Brad J

View Xrayguy's profile

Xrayguy

38 posts in 2014 days


#3 posted 1717 days ago

ok i figured it out, thank you very much

-- Brad J

View ChunkyC's profile

ChunkyC

856 posts in 1850 days


#4 posted 1717 days ago

I hope you didn’t use that green wire as the neutral! That can get you big trouble if you ever anything go to ground.

-- Chunk's Workshop pictures: http://spadfest.rcspads.com/thumbnails.php?album=135

View Xrayguy's profile

Xrayguy

38 posts in 2014 days


#5 posted 1717 days ago

i used the green as ground? and black to black and white to red since the grizzly uses only black white and green, should i do something differnet?

-- Brad J

View ChunkyC's profile

ChunkyC

856 posts in 1850 days


#6 posted 1717 days ago

Sounds like to me that you just wired you light to 220 Vac! I would check your voltage on the light from the black to white. If there’s no white wire coming from the panel, then the only way your getting 120 Vac is using the ground. That can be very dangerous.

I should make a drawing that explains this….

-- Chunk's Workshop pictures: http://spadfest.rcspads.com/thumbnails.php?album=135

View Xrayguy's profile

Xrayguy

38 posts in 2014 days


#7 posted 1717 days ago

there is a black red white and green wire on the unit, it came wired for 110 i wired it for 220 using the instructions that came with it, the wires on the light are black white and green, when i wired it the saw up for 220 it only used, black white and green. a drawing would be helpfull since i dont want to burn out the units lol thanks for any info.

-- Brad J

View ChunkyC's profile

ChunkyC

856 posts in 1850 days


#8 posted 1717 days ago

Sorry. You said “3 wire system, black white and green” I didn’t understand that you had the neutral there as well. Sounds like you did the right thing!

-- Chunk's Workshop pictures: http://spadfest.rcspads.com/thumbnails.php?album=135

View Xrayguy's profile

Xrayguy

38 posts in 2014 days


#9 posted 1717 days ago

http://cdn0.grizzly.com/manuals/g0513_m.pdf

Page 56 is the wiring diagram

-- Brad J

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14584 posts in 2272 days


#10 posted 1717 days ago

Xrayguy, the wiring diagram shows you only have 220 coming to the saw. You need to use a 220 volt lap in the light or continue uisng your 120 v cord. Opinion of master electrician.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Xrayguy's profile

Xrayguy

38 posts in 2014 days


#11 posted 1717 days ago

220 volt lap? can i just use one leg of the 220 for the light?

-- Brad J

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14584 posts in 2272 days


#12 posted 1717 days ago

NO, you need to connect to the 2 power wires on the cord coming into the machine. Then you can use a 220 volt lamp. If you forget or some one else installs a 120 volt lamp, it will blow up and potentially throw glass every where. I would advise against doing it and continue using your 120 volt cord lamp or get a battery operated LED type light fixture and use it rather than the 220 volt lamp. LEDs lights use low current and have long battery life and put out a lot of light.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Xrayguy's profile

Xrayguy

38 posts in 2014 days


#13 posted 1717 days ago

this is more complicated than i imagined lol ill just plug the 110 lamp in to the wall until i can find a 220 volt lamp to hardwire into the saw, thank you very much for all your advise.

-- Brad J

View papadan's profile

papadan

1111 posts in 1964 days


#14 posted 1717 days ago

Grizzly can get someone killed with that miserable wiring. ALL systems use Black as 110 hot, white as neutral and green as ground. If 220 is to be used there should be another wire, red for the second 110 line, with white remaining a neutral. If you are going to use that saw as-is at 220v, then connect your light as Black to black and the lamp white and green to the circuit green. Now we can see why Grizzly is not UL listed or allowed in Canada.

-- Carpenter assembles with hands, Designer builds with brains, Artist creates with heart!

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14584 posts in 2272 days


#15 posted 1717 days ago

3 wire cords and cables come with black, white and green wires. 4 wire cables come with black, white, green and red. Since the saw only requires 2 current carrying conductors to operate, they use a 3 conductor cable. The 2 they need are black and white plus a green to run a ground. It is not only Grizzly, it is everybody in the business of electrical equipment. You will find white hot wires in your residential wiring where a two wire cable is used to go to a switch and back. This is just a standard wiring diagram that would be provided with any piece of equipment convertible form 120 to 240 operation.

“Green is ground the world around,” or at least it should be!! White is neutral in 120 volt unless it’s being used as a switch leg. White is hot in 240 volt applications where there is no need for a neutral. This is for manufactured cords and cables. When we pull wire in conduit, we are supposed to use the correct colors. Note I said “supposed to.”

One time I told a home owner I would correct the label in his panel since I knew where the circuit went. He said it’s already labeled, why isn’t it right? I told him the code requires it to be labeled; it doesn’t say anything about correctly! :-))

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

showing 1 through 15 of 23 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase