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Refinishing solid Teak coffee table

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Forum topic by 123Luke123 posted 08-25-2015 02:25 PM 633 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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123Luke123

6 posts in 468 days


08-25-2015 02:25 PM

Hey guys have a few questions. Haven’t refinished many things before. I just got a solid teak table for the wife and I would like to refinish it. Has some nicks and scuffs in it but nothing major. Should I start at 80 and sand down to 220 or higher? Should I use teak or Danish oil as a finisher or a polyurethane. I like the look of the grain so I would like that to be accented as much as possible with whatever finish. Also after the first coat with a cloth should I apply the second with 600 grit sand paper? Someone told me this helps get a very smooth surface. Any info much appreciated. Thanks. Here’s a pic of the table


12 replies so far

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mahdee

3551 posts in 1230 days


#1 posted 08-25-2015 07:01 PM

Starting with 80 sounds good. Not sure about going to 600 as you want the oil to penetrate in the wood and 600 will pretty much disallow that. You can use Zar poly every two years or so to maintain the color. If you use the Zar, it does need to be exposed to partial sun. Oils probably will need redoing every year and they can mold.

-- earthartandfoods.com

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Finisherman

227 posts in 1311 days


#2 posted 08-25-2015 11:12 PM

How rough is the table? Are you sanding it to remove damaged wood, or are you sanding to remove the old finish? If the latter, I’d use paint and varnish remover instead. If you sand wood with a grit that rough, you’ll likely remove the aged surface of the wood that prized by collectors, along with the finish. Also, it’s a lot more work to sand off a finish than to strip it chemically. If you strip the surface, you might be able to start at 150 grit and finish at 220. Yes, sanding the oil into the surface with 600 grit paper will help to achieve a glass-smooth surface.

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Aj2

688 posts in 1260 days


#3 posted 08-26-2015 03:03 AM

Luke it really Doent look like teak to me, but it does look like it was handplaned with a nicely cambered blade.
So I think I looks nice as it is..Since it’s not my table feel free to do with it what you want.
I don’t use sandpaper so I got nothing more to add.Good luck and nice find.

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123Luke123

6 posts in 468 days


#4 posted 08-26-2015 04:09 AM

I agree with the statement of it doesn’t look like teak. It’s darker than I thought teak was. I was just going off of what the seller told me. It’s some type of dense hardwood because the table weighs about 100 pounds if not more. As far as how rough the table is its not bad just not smooth. Honestly I just want the natural wood grain to show more. The picture with flash makes the table look better in my opinion. Can’t see the grain well in natural lighting

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123Luke123

6 posts in 468 days


#5 posted 08-26-2015 04:10 AM

Dense*

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123Luke123

6 posts in 468 days


#6 posted 09-09-2015 12:42 AM

New question. Refinished the table and I love how it looks. It has 3 coats of Danish oil on it and I started putting poly on it for extra protection. The first and second coat came out fine but after that the finish is

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Finisherman

227 posts in 1311 days


#7 posted 09-10-2015 12:39 AM

Hi Luke:

Let me begin by saying that that is a beautiful table. It looks to me as though it might be made from one of the more exotic woods, perhaps wenge or cocobolo. The problem with these exotic woods is that they contain a whole lot of natural oil. This oil can wreck havoc with a film finish like polyurethane. As much as it pains me to tell you this, your only recourse at this point is likely to strip off at least the poly and start again. This time though, I’d begin by thoroughly washing the stripped surface with lacquer thinner or acetone and plenty of clean rags. Next, before more oil can seep to the surface, seal the wood with dewaxed shellac and proceed from there with your polyurethane finish.

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

3665 posts in 1728 days


#8 posted 09-10-2015 01:07 AM

What Finisherman says is right on the money. Had a similar problem with rosewood plane totes. Like he says I used acetone and it worked just fine.

That is an incredible looking table top and once you get it done your going to have a bunch of bragging rights.

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123Luke123

6 posts in 468 days


#9 posted 09-10-2015 01:30 AM

Well dang haha. Thanks for all the info guys. I’ll begin that tomorrow. Never had this happen before so I’m glad someone knows what’s going on.

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Aj2

688 posts in 1260 days


#10 posted 09-10-2015 02:13 AM

I also like the table,It’s worth getting right. Why does the finish have to be soo thick what are you protecting the wood from? Are there ruffians around pounding thier beer mugs on the table? Keep it simple Danish oil is easy to refesh and cleaning a surface with lemon oil will keep you close to what Mother Nature blessed you with.

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123Luke123

6 posts in 468 days


#11 posted 09-10-2015 02:27 AM

Funny you say that because yes I am trying to protect the table from football watching ruffians haha. I liked the table with just danish oil honestly but don’t really trust my friends to use coasters and respect the table honestly so I was trying to find a way to amp up the protection of the wood.

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Aj2

688 posts in 1260 days


#12 posted 09-10-2015 04:25 AM

Darn ruffians.

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