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Is this a 220 breaker?

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Forum topic by Shane posted 08-25-2015 02:20 AM 1903 views 0 times favorited 68 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Shane

294 posts in 1277 days


08-25-2015 02:20 AM

well the new jointer IS 220 but I’m wondering if I was wrong and I do have 220 service. There aren’t sockets set up but the wire might be there if this is a 220 breaker Sorry the pic posted sideways


68 replies so far

View JayT's profile

JayT

4785 posts in 1677 days


#1 posted 08-25-2015 02:24 AM

The two double breakers (one taking up slots 5 & 7, the other in slots 11 & 13) are for 220V. Usually those are for your dryer, stove or air conditioner. If one is not being used for anything, it could certainly be used for your jointer. They’re both off in your pic, so I have to wonder what they are supposed to be for.

You also have empty slots, so could add another breaker and run new wire for your jointer it they are in use.

-- "Good judgement is the result of experience. A lot of experience is the result of poor judgement."

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Shane

294 posts in 1277 days


#2 posted 08-25-2015 02:28 AM

They aren’t in use. This panel is only for my shop and I powered them off because one was for a lift that is no longer there (previous owner) and the other is just bare wires running to a closet.

View BorkBob's profile

BorkBob

124 posts in 2158 days


#3 posted 08-25-2015 03:14 PM

Electric panels usually have two parallel rows of tabs that run from the main breaker (or lugs in a sub panel). The breakers have slots that fit over these tabs. A breaker that contacts only one tab is “single pole” and provides 120 volts. A breaker that contacts a tab from each row is “double pole” and provides 240 volts.

-- Please Pray for Our Troops / Semper Fi / Bob Ross / www.theborkstore.com

View bonesbr549's profile

bonesbr549

1176 posts in 2533 days


#4 posted 08-25-2015 03:38 PM

Looks like a double pole 220v breaker to me. You have two bus bars in the center and that sucker should cross both of them. Did you say bare wires? I’d get an electrician out there to look at all of it.

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

View Shane's profile

Shane

294 posts in 1277 days


#5 posted 08-25-2015 05:16 PM

I talked to my electrician friend and bought what I need to make it work. I will need to replace the breaker with a double pole 20 amp but that’s no big deal. The existing wires are fine, but just were coiled up in a closet. I noticed that when we first bought the house and turned the breaker off to them. I’ll wire them into the outlet I just bought and replace the breaker and I should be good to go.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4234 posts in 1665 days


#6 posted 08-25-2015 05:20 PM

Curious as to why you will downsize the breaker instead of just using the 30A ones that are already there.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View Shane's profile

Shane

294 posts in 1277 days


#7 posted 08-25-2015 05:21 PM

Because the Jointer is rated for 15 amps. According to my friend the electrician you should never oversize your breakers. It risks a panel fire. The 20 will allow it to pull a little extra at startup like they tend to do but be in the proper range.

View Everett1's profile

Everett1

213 posts in 2000 days


#8 posted 08-25-2015 05:42 PM

curious how a bigger breaker, with proper gauge wire, and something pulling less on it (the 15amps you mentioned) would risk a panel fire?

With that thinking, you risk panel fires on anything in your house not pulling available amps; lights, your alarm clock, cable box, etc etc.

Unless my logic is flawed, which i’m open to being shown.

Ev

-- Ev in Framingham, MA

View Shane's profile

Shane

294 posts in 1277 days


#9 posted 08-25-2015 06:10 PM

I think his point is that the breaker won’t trip if the machine pulls more than it is supposed to because some sort of failure. I guess that would be more likely to cause a fire on the machine itself. I probably just misunderstood

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MrUnix

4234 posts in 1665 days


#10 posted 08-25-2015 06:21 PM

According to my friend the electrician you should never oversize your breakers. It risks a panel fire.

If the existing 30amp circuits were wired correctly (ie: proper size wire), then downsizing your breaker gives you no benefit at all, and will actually limit future use if you want to plug in something bigger down the road.

The breaker is not there to protect the machine (or whatever you plug into the outlet)... it’s there to protect the wires in the wall. Otherwise, like Ev said, you should downsize all those 15A wall outlet circuits that only have a 1 amp desk lamp or .5 amp alarm clock plugged in.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View Shane's profile

Shane

294 posts in 1277 days


#11 posted 08-25-2015 06:39 PM

You may be right but if the electrician says it’s not a good idea, then I’m going to take his word for it. I can easily put the bigger breaker back in someday if I need to.

View Dallas's profile

Dallas

3599 posts in 1953 days


#12 posted 08-25-2015 06:54 PM

What certification does your electrician have? He should know better as Mr. Unix said.

Hmmm, I don’t have much confidence in your ‘electrician friend.’

I do RV park electrical setup for the pedestals and also RV electrical work.

At an RV park each pedestal is set up at the main panel with a 50 amp 2P2T breaker. From there it travels to the pedestal where, (normally), there is a 50 amp, 30 amp and 20 amp breaker and receptacle.

Dallas

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

View Shane's profile

Shane

294 posts in 1277 days


#13 posted 08-25-2015 07:08 PM

Ok I see your point. To be fair I went back an reread exactly what he said. Here it is verbatim:

Me: My jointer plug says 15 amp and the breaker is 30 so is that ok?

Him: Some people would hook it up . but your wire to your jointer is probably good for 20 amps not a good idea to put it on a 30 amp . never good to over size breaker. fire Hazzard.

View Mosquito's profile

Mosquito

8124 posts in 1758 days


#14 posted 08-25-2015 07:47 PM

^ That makes it sound like the wire that was run from the breaker isn’t rated for 30amp, so he’s suggesting you go down to 20amp to get in the proper range of what the wiring is rated for. I 100% agree if that’s the situation. Possible he also meant the power cable for the jointer too, not sure given the context exactly, but either way it sounds like he’s suggesting to downsize breaker to get under the safe amperage of the wires in question.

-- Mos - Twin Cities, MN - http://www.youtube.com/MosquitoMods - http://www.TheModsquito.com

View Shane's profile

Shane

294 posts in 1277 days


#15 posted 08-25-2015 07:52 PM

I think he was referring to the wire connected to the jointer. The wires from the box are beefy as all get out.

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