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What kind of wood is this?

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Forum topic by ohtimberwolf posted 08-24-2015 11:06 PM 863 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ohtimberwolf

634 posts in 1811 days


08-24-2015 11:06 PM

Lowes locally has a lumber they call white wood. It is ¾ inch thick and various widths. What I looked at was the 3” wide by 8’. The wood looks very clear of knots and is smooth but the edges are a little fuzzy. It seems sort of soft to me. Can someone tell me what this wood is and what it is good to use for and to not use for?

It actually seems nicer than the other woods they have of that type. I would think it would take paint fine but I don’t know about stain as it seem to me it would soak right in as soon as you put it on.

Anyone know anything about this wood? larry

-- Just a barn cat, now gone to cat heaven.


15 replies so far

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TheFridge

5764 posts in 945 days


#1 posted 08-24-2015 11:33 PM

Any number of white colored species. No telling.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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kweinert

38 posts in 2568 days


#2 posted 08-24-2015 11:52 PM

At a guess I’d say Aspen.

The fuzzy edge and softness speak Aspen as opposed to one of the pines.

-- Experience is a hard teacher because she gives the test first, the lesson afterward. But properly learned, the lesson forever changes the person.

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jmartel

6564 posts in 1609 days


#3 posted 08-24-2015 11:53 PM

It’s not a set species. Usually whatever is around that color and that they can get cheap. Aspen, Fir, Hemlock, etc.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

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ohtimberwolf

634 posts in 1811 days


#4 posted 08-25-2015 12:20 AM

Thanks guys. I guess it is anybody’s choice. larry

-- Just a barn cat, now gone to cat heaven.

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jonah

687 posts in 2758 days


#5 posted 08-25-2015 01:42 AM

It could be pine, spruce, fir, aspen, hemlock, et cetera. There’s virtually no way to know.

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ohtimberwolf

634 posts in 1811 days


#6 posted 08-26-2015 11:49 AM

Jonah, That is what I gather by the other posts. I have never seen wood quite this white before and I guess ash must leave a fuzzy edge from what Kweinert says in post #2 and others have posted. I have a lot to learn. Thanks larry

-- Just a barn cat, now gone to cat heaven.

View SirIrb's profile

SirIrb

1239 posts in 690 days


#7 posted 08-26-2015 11:57 AM

Spruce. Run away.

What does it smell like. Spruce can have a kinda stank to it.

-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

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ohtimberwolf

634 posts in 1811 days


#8 posted 08-26-2015 12:04 PM

SirIrb, no odor at all. Straight and very little grain. Looking at the end of the boards (3×3/4) the grain runs nearly horizontal. larry

-- Just a barn cat, now gone to cat heaven.

View BinghamtonEd's profile

BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1829 days


#9 posted 08-26-2015 01:07 PM



Jonah, That is what I gather by the other posts. I have never seen wood quite this white before and I guess ash must leave a fuzzy edge from what Kweinert says in post #2 and others have posted. I have a lot to learn. Thanks larry

- ohtimberwolf

Kweinert was mentioning aspen, not to be confused with ash. They look completely different (I have a lot of air-dried ash, and it fades to a yellow after drying, and then much whiter after milling), and you’re not going to find it in your local Lowes or HD marked as whitewood. All of the whitewood I’ve seen at those stores has been softwoods.

That wood would be fine for painting, but I bet you could get poplar from a hardwood dealer or mill for the same price (maybe less), and I find it takes paint better (smoother). You can satin that wood, but you may want to use a blotch control first…my guess is it will stain like pine, fir, etc.

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

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kweinert

38 posts in 2568 days


#10 posted 08-26-2015 01:42 PM

Yes, aspen, not ash. Ash has a grain that’s sort of oak-like and is harder. It won’t fuzz like aspen does.

What you’re describing sounds much more like aspen than an of the other white woods. Not much grain, soft, fuzzy – it’ll blotch like crazy. Much worse than any of the pines.

-- Experience is a hard teacher because she gives the test first, the lesson afterward. But properly learned, the lesson forever changes the person.

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ohtimberwolf

634 posts in 1811 days


#11 posted 08-26-2015 06:38 PM

I used it to replace some stiles in a kitchen that is a rental unit and painted them. I only replaced 6 42 inch long stiles and the rental unit is not an expensive one so I guess it will work for now. I mostly bought it because it was straight and not twisted and just the right sizes I needed. Now I know what not to use in other projects. Thanks guys. larry

-- Just a barn cat, now gone to cat heaven.

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jonah

687 posts in 2758 days


#12 posted 08-26-2015 09:04 PM

I’ve learned the hard way to stay away from the wood at the box stores unless I’m in a real pinch on a weekend and can’t get to a real lumberyard. It’s nearly always twisted, cupped, knotty, wavy, or all four at once. Add to that the fact that it doesn’t really cost any less than what I get at a real lumberyard, and I’m done with them.

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johnstoneb

2143 posts in 1632 days


#13 posted 08-26-2015 09:23 PM

It’s probably spruce, subalpine fir, lodgepole pine might fit in there. It is species that used to be considered trash and either not cut or sent for pulp.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

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bondogaposis

4020 posts in 1810 days


#14 posted 08-26-2015 10:03 PM

It could be any of these species, lodge pole pine, grand fir, spruce and may be a few others depending what part of the country you are in. The lumber industry developed this as a “catch all” category because they can be used similarly.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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ohtimberwolf

634 posts in 1811 days


#15 posted 08-27-2015 12:23 PM

Sure is a lot to learn. That is why sites like this are so important. Most of my work has been in redoing older houses usually duplexes. This one was a century home. I wish I didn’t have any rentals at all now. Getting too old to mess with it. larry

-- Just a barn cat, now gone to cat heaven.

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