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Was this correct/safe tablesaw order of operations?

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Forum topic by woodcox posted 08-23-2015 08:33 PM 850 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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woodcox

1575 posts in 1479 days


08-23-2015 08:33 PM

I am repairing a table for my mother and need to rebuild these corner brackets. Tests were done with a 12” or so 2bu4, brackets will be from maple when I get it down.

My ts is left tilt and I put the fence left of the blade. Made two rips at angle…

Flipped again and ripped the bracket free at 90 degrees…

Pieces were taped back together for explanation. I have only had a proper ts for about a year now and I definitely respect the tool. I am unsure of proper operations at times and some insight is always sought after. Any input would be great, thank you in advance for future digit retention:)

-- "My god has more wood than your god" ... G. Carlin.


11 replies so far

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Kazooman

628 posts in 1419 days


#1 posted 08-23-2015 08:40 PM

I think you want the grain to be running in the other direction. Look at the originals and see how they eventually split along the grain.

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woodcox

1575 posts in 1479 days


#2 posted 08-23-2015 08:44 PM

Opposite of the originals or my test piece? Test piece is opposite of the originals.

-- "My god has more wood than your god" ... G. Carlin.

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Kazooman

628 posts in 1419 days


#3 posted 08-23-2015 09:18 PM

You want it like the originals. The corner blocks are there to strengthen the joint and keep it from spreading open or pulling apart. That would put tension across the width of the block. If you cut them like your test piece, they could fail along the grain line, especially where there is a screw hole. Admittedly, with small pieces like these, the likelihood is small, but I would still try to change it.

The best way to do the cut depends on your tools. You could even make the cuts with a hand saw. Cut the angle on one end of a longer piece of stock that is the desired final thickness. Then make the second cut to remove the piece. That leaves you with the bevel on the stock and you can cut off the next block, and then the final two. Five cuts in all. You could do the same safely on the band saw.

On the table saw you could make a simple jig to support the stock and keep you fingers out of harms way. Like a tenoning jig that rides on the fence. Your workpiece could be attached to the face of the jig with temporary screws. Keep the screws out of the path of the blade!

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woodcox

1575 posts in 1479 days


#4 posted 08-23-2015 10:02 PM

Good info, thank you sir.

-- "My god has more wood than your god" ... G. Carlin.

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Kazooman

628 posts in 1419 days


#5 posted 08-23-2015 10:19 PM

OH! I took a closer look and saw the tee nuts on the back of the pieces. There is more going on here than just strengthening the joint. What fastens to the tee nuts? I don’t see any marks on the face of the blocks to suggest what may have been attached with the tee nuts. Perhaps this is the result of several rounds of repairs and modifications to the table.

In any case, with the tee nuts supporting something, I really think you need to have the grain running like I suggested otherwise any tension on the piece will tend to split it. Actually, you might consider laminating two layers of good quality plywood as an alternative to the maple. Two pieces of 3/4” Baltic birch ply isn’t going anywhere!

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woodcox

1575 posts in 1479 days


#6 posted 08-24-2015 03:02 AM

Those tee nuts are how the legs attach to the table top. I like your idea with the plywood. You are right it has been repaired a few times. Weird, the brackets have been glued, nailed, and screwed to the legs during manufacture. Makes sense I suppose during construction to avoid clamping while glue sets. Probably too much perforation in that small of an area to be viable. The tables are oak and made in Taiwan, brackets are of some other type of hardwood. There has been some adhesive and liquid nails type stuff after the fact as an attempt to repair. She has said she does not care if the legs can be removed in the future. I assume it was just for flat packing.

My mom was given two end tables and a matching coffee table. This end table has always been broken and in storage. She asked me to repair and shorten it to 14 3/4” tall to replace the coffee table which is a little to big for the room. FUNNY, I mocked it up with the offcuts and texted a pic to her this morning. Asking, “are you sure 4 3/4” tall? Seems too short to me.” Snicker;)

It took a few texts for her to figure it out. Lol! I did get quite the ribbing from her and the wife when I said I could do it, to the effect of “all the legs must be the same length and not be 4” tall” and so on. She deserved it.

My wife does not like her bar height dinette set and for some reason(s) does not fully trust me to shorten the set. So this is a way to “prove” my abilities as a wood butcher. I’ve invested way too much time and tools not to be able to pull it off, I tell her. Then I get the look. What’s up with that?

-- "My god has more wood than your god" ... G. Carlin.

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CharlieM1958

16244 posts in 3685 days


#7 posted 08-24-2015 03:14 AM

Since you mentioned safety, I’ve always heard that the blade should never be tilted toward the fence in a close-quarters cut like the one you are making there because it increases the chance of a kickback.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

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woodcox

1575 posts in 1479 days


#8 posted 08-24-2015 03:25 AM

That sounded familiar too before I made the cut. I couldn’t think of another way to do it. Hence my main question behind this topic. I took the riving knife off for the pictures. I have never used the blade guard, but I’ve never had less than ten fingers either. Any good books recommended for the ts?

Ed: I have a band saw, handsaws ect. but I wanted to learn how this could be done on the ts.

-- "My god has more wood than your god" ... G. Carlin.

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woodcox

1575 posts in 1479 days


#9 posted 08-29-2015 05:26 PM

Back together now. I ended up making the the brackets on the bandsaw from cherry. I glued and pinned them to the legs. I used long lag bolts that went through the brackets and into the oak legs to attach them to the table. I oriented the grain the same as the originals. Thanks Kazooman for your insight. I could not find lag bolts in a different color but I think a brown sharpie will make them less noticeable through the glass top.

-- "My god has more wood than your god" ... G. Carlin.

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Tim

3119 posts in 1428 days


#10 posted 08-29-2015 05:31 PM

Nice WC. Did you pass the test so your wife will let you make something for the house yet? I think that’s so funny considering the very nice quality of the things you make.

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Kazooman

628 posts in 1419 days


#11 posted 08-29-2015 06:02 PM

Nice job! That table should provide many more years of use. If the bolt heads bother you too much you could make covers out of some thin matching stock.

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