LumberJocks

Ugly stumps

  • Advertise with us

« back to Finishing forum

Forum topic by Monkeyandafootball posted 08-23-2015 06:27 PM 1198 views 0 times favorited 26 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Monkeyandafootball's profile

Monkeyandafootball

14 posts in 475 days


08-23-2015 06:27 PM

Topic tags/keywords: stump stump tables side table danish oil

ok, so first off i am DEF a newbie, a clueless newbie at that. I am attempting to make some stump side tables and i have run into a problem i cannot seem to google myself out of. After sanding my black walnut limb pieces to death, i applied a coat of WATCO danish oil finish. and theyre ugly. dark and ugly:
http://i927.photobucket.com/albums/ad115/stumpie3/Mobile%20Uploads/image_zpspyr6sps6.jpg so i waited 2 days and resanded in an attempt to get the danish oil finish off. heres one resanded:
http://i927.photobucket.com/albums/ad115/stumpie3/Mobile%20Uploads/image_zps8r13bllz.jpg id like the stumps to have a nice natural finish, not a dark stained look like the danish oil stuff gave them….so i was hoping to resand and then just poly them (?). problem is, after resanding one of the stumps in order to get back to bare wood, the top looks horribly cloudy. when i wipe it off with a damp rag its beautiful, like this:
http://i927.photobucket.com/albums/ad115/stumpie3/Mobile%20Uploads/image_zpsqqxtg751.jpg but when it dries it loses all of its detail and just looks like a cloudy mess like this:
http://i927.photobucket.com/albums/ad115/stumpie3/Mobile%20Uploads/image_zpsroou73qb.jpg
so i guess my question is, if i poly the stump will it look “wet”” and defined, or will i just be sealing in the cloudy mess? thanks for any help and advice!


26 replies so far

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1777 days


#1 posted 08-23-2015 06:40 PM

You forgot the number 1 rule of finishing. “try it on scraps first”.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Monkeyandafootball's profile

Monkeyandafootball

14 posts in 475 days


#2 posted 08-23-2015 06:42 PM

ahh, its not that i forgot it, i never knew it! im learning my lessons the hard way thats for sure :/

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

7489 posts in 1475 days


#3 posted 08-23-2015 06:58 PM

The wood has really sucked in that oil. Any chance you still have enough height to saw off an inch and start over?

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3555 posts in 1235 days


#4 posted 08-23-2015 07:03 PM

They look just fine. If you are going to use them outdoors, use Zar outdoor poly. A little spray of poly on top should give you an idea of the look you’re going to get. My guess is that you will be happy with it.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View Monkeyandafootball's profile

Monkeyandafootball

14 posts in 475 days


#5 posted 08-23-2015 07:07 PM

sure, theres height to work with. the problem is the “heartwood”(?) of the black walnut is hard as concrete! sanding the sides is easy enuf, but the top is another story (especially for a girl weighing in at 88 lbs!)

im planning on using them indoors. i guess im just confused about why the top looks cloudy when dry and so pretty when wet…and what the final result will look if i just poly them (after resanding them).

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

7489 posts in 1475 days


#6 posted 08-23-2015 07:17 PM

Ok, then try sanding the “bottoms” and do a test on that end. Use the oil on one, and do one with no oil. Spray a coat or 2 of clear lacquer and see which one you like best. If they come out fine, maybe the end you show in your pictures can become the bottom.

Oh, and WELCOME to LJs !

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

View Monkeyandafootball's profile

Monkeyandafootball

14 posts in 475 days


#7 posted 08-23-2015 07:18 PM

oh wait, you mean saw off an inch of the top like with a chainsaw and start over? cant do that, i dont have a chainsaw and theres no way i have the manstrength it would require to saw it off by hand, so sanding is my only option.

View Monkeyandafootball's profile

Monkeyandafootball

14 posts in 475 days


#8 posted 08-23-2015 07:20 PM

that is a great idea joeinga, except for the fact that i planned (and still plan) on painting the bottom halves of the stumps and decided to use ugly white woodfiller in the gouges i made debarking them on the lower halves :O

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

7489 posts in 1475 days


#9 posted 08-23-2015 07:24 PM

Well, you might still be able to sand the bottom and shoot it with a coat of clear lacquer as a test run to see how the top will look.

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

View Monkeyandafootball's profile

Monkeyandafootball

14 posts in 475 days


#10 posted 08-23-2015 07:25 PM

View Monkeyandafootball's profile

Monkeyandafootball

14 posts in 475 days


#11 posted 08-23-2015 07:59 PM

i vacuumed the top of the stump i resanded and did a test swipe of some clear poly:

http://i927.photobucket.com/albums/ad115/stumpie3/Mobile%20Uploads/image_zpsqbd6mwpu.jpg

if thats how itll look finished i think ill be happy with that :)

once i finish resanding the other 2 stumps, i am going to paint the bottom halves with a black gloss enamel latex, im trying to go for a rustic meets modern thing….trying…

View jerryminer's profile

jerryminer

528 posts in 909 days


#12 posted 08-23-2015 08:22 PM

Short answer, yes the “wet look” is what poly will leave you with, in general. Always good to test on scrap (or the bottom, before you paint)

View Monkeyandafootball's profile

Monkeyandafootball

14 posts in 475 days


#13 posted 08-23-2015 08:27 PM

thanks for all the input. ive learned my lesson to “test” before diving in, or just listening to the dude at lowes who sold me the danish oil telling me it wouldnt change the look of my stumps very much! I used the “natural” danish oil finish and was just shocked to see how orange they turned. maybe it had something to do with how dry the stumps were? i dried them for over a year before i started on them.

View Clarkie's profile

Clarkie

380 posts in 1309 days


#14 posted 08-23-2015 08:31 PM

How about flipping the logs end for end and starting over. The thing with Watco oil, which is a great product, is that it goes to the center of the wood and starts filling from there out. You can get a clear Watco, and Watco can be cut with poly and applied by hand, 50/50 mix.

View esmthin's profile

esmthin

77 posts in 649 days


#15 posted 08-24-2015 03:42 AM

I think the problem is that you are doing this on end grain. End grain tends to soak in moisture more than long grain, so you get a darker color than expected.

-- Ethan, https://instagram.com/ethan_woodworker/

showing 1 through 15 of 26 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com