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Using a round over bit on timber

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Forum topic by robscastle posted 08-21-2015 06:30 AM 809 views 1 time favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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robscastle

3393 posts in 1670 days


08-21-2015 06:30 AM

I used a 2” round over bit on some Kitchen workbench legs.

It worked out well until I had a close look at the stopped section.

As you can see there is a reverse curve on each side, side 3 and 4 are the same as 1 and 2.

Try as I may using every WW trick I knew I could not remove it on the router table, so I used my Oscillating spindle sander to correct the curvature.

This was a right pain as the square section required me to elevate the leg to do so.

I know if I had a lathe it would not be a issue but I don’t, so I was wondering if anybody else had experienced tthe same problem and just how it could be removed in a simple way with the tools I have.

-- Regards Robert


10 replies so far

View SuperCubber's profile

SuperCubber

872 posts in 1750 days


#1 posted 08-21-2015 07:29 AM

Hi Robert,

If you clamp a piece of scrap to the leg to make a corner where you want the round over, it should take care of it. Just rout right around the corner.

-- Joe | Spartanburg, SC | "To give anything less than your best is to sacrafice the gift." - Steve Prefontaine

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pjones46

986 posts in 2109 days


#2 posted 08-21-2015 06:25 PM

Is the leg stock out of square?

-- Respectfully, Paul

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

3393 posts in 1670 days


#3 posted 08-22-2015 03:00 AM

Thanks for the feedback,

SuperCubber:- I read what you are saying but do not understand exactly what you mean.

pjones46:- No all the legs were jointed and then thicknessed from rough sawn lumber before being rounded over.

-- Regards Robert

View firefighterontheside's profile

firefighterontheside

13511 posts in 1323 days


#4 posted 08-22-2015 03:42 AM

I’m not sure how that’s possible.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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robscastle

3393 posts in 1670 days


#5 posted 08-22-2015 03:48 AM

Yep , its got me stumped for the time being, but I will keep trying to find the solution !!

-- Regards Robert

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firefighterontheside

13511 posts in 1323 days


#6 posted 08-22-2015 04:09 AM

Still trying to wrap my head around this. What happens if you now place each piece back on the table the other direction and back in to the bit, essentially a climb cut, but only long enough to correct the curve in each side.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

View jerryminer's profile

jerryminer

528 posts in 907 days


#7 posted 08-22-2015 06:09 AM

It’s a function of the round-over bit. Every round-over will do this (but it’s more obvious on bigger round-overs).

In your pics, the cut on the left was made with the visible surface used as the reference surface for the cut (IOW, if you are using a router table or shaper, the face we see was oriented DOWN on the table during the cut on the left). The cut on the right was made with the face on the right as the reference face. The bit is approaching the work from a different orientation.

You can “balance” the cuts by routing only from two OPPOSITE faces (i.e. rolling and flipping the workpiece 180 deg., not 90, between cuts. Then you will get the same cut on each side of each face. (But you’ll still get two of each type.)

Hand work is the only way I know of to even it all out.

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robscastle

3393 posts in 1670 days


#8 posted 08-22-2015 08:16 AM

Thanks men, All the suggestions prompted me to try again, as jerryminer pointed out no matter what direction you come from you will still get a odd pair.

I just set everything up again and tried it.
Sure enough same result.

Here is my setuup

And another piece of timber, it has a chunk missing so the results are average on the side 1 and side 4.

The sides are numbered and the direction shown

The results.

Side 1 Missed the full effect with the chunk missing.

Side 2 You can definately see the odd pairing here

Side 3 Visible again here.

Side 4 Same as side 1 but a mirror image

I tried reversing it and all the other suggestions as firefighterontheside mentioned but the same result remained.

I had stop blocks fitted to ensure accurate start and stop positions.

So just when I was about to give up I tried free routing from the other side and using only one stop block and due care. The workpiece remained stationary on the stop block and all I did was arc the piece onto the bearing to 90 degrees and then remove it.

This is the modified setup

This is the modified result.

Due care in using powered equipment when doing “free hand” routing must be observed and a stop block is a must for both accuracy and safety to the operator.

-- Regards Robert

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SuperCubber

872 posts in 1750 days


#9 posted 08-22-2015 09:32 AM

Here is what I was talking about (I apologize for the crude drawing, but it’s all I had time for this morning):

In case it isn’t evident, the scrap pieces would be clamped to the leg.

-- Joe | Spartanburg, SC | "To give anything less than your best is to sacrafice the gift." - Steve Prefontaine

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robscastle

3393 posts in 1670 days


#10 posted 08-22-2015 10:26 AM

An apology is not required, !! the diagram now explains it fully,

Thank you

-- Regards Robert

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