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easy wood tools vs robert sorby carbide

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Forum topic by Vicki posted 08-20-2015 02:53 AM 1260 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Vicki

1043 posts in 2809 days


08-20-2015 02:53 AM

Topic tags/keywords: lathe tools ewt robert sorby carbide

I have the Robert Sorby carbide tool with the interchangeable cutters. I don’t seem to do well with it. Maybe I need more practice. I don’t care for the distance from the wood required by the ‘head’. I did’t go with EWT in the first place as they seemed to pricey. Now I think I might like the finisher and detailer due to the square stock. I need to figure out which length tool would be best for someone turning pens, Christmas ornaments, and small boxes. Mid-size or full? Anyone have experience using the full size tools on small items. Anyone used both brands and care to comment on which they think is best?
Thanks so much.

-- Vicki on the Eastern Shore of MD


20 replies so far

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Nubsnstubs

826 posts in 1195 days


#1 posted 08-20-2015 02:33 PM

Vicki, are you talking about the one that you’ve got to keep your tool rest about 3” away from the work piece? If so, I’ve seen it, used it for about one minute, and can’t figure out why that was even put on the market considering most instruction you see or participate in will always tell you to keep your tool rest about 1/4” from your work.

The one I did use was recommended to a woman member of my local turning club by a member. He should have steered her towards something more manageable.

I have 3 EWT’s. The large rougher, detailer, and the straight hollower with the small round cutter. It takes awhile to get used to the way they work. The famous learning curve you hear about. It’s also been said you can’t get finish cuts with them, but the CI1 rougher gives me wispy trails of super thin curlies that looks like dense smoke floating off my wood. The smoothness would be equivalent to a 220 grit finish.

The CI4 detailer is used for removing tenons mostly, and possible shaping of a lid seat.

The CI5 is used for the inside cutting of most of my bowls, and for all hollowforms.

The drawback to the carbides is they, EWT and all the others, don’t tell you that the carbide can be sharpened. Their selling point is they (cutters) last a long time, and when it’s dull, get another one.

When you need to sharpen your carbide, post again, and I’ll reply how I do it that gets me back to at least 98% of factory sharpness…...... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson)

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Fred Hargis

3945 posts in 1958 days


#2 posted 08-20-2015 02:48 PM

I’m about as inexperienced turner as you could imagine. But I did pick up 3 used EZW tools at about 1/2 the cost of new, so decided to give ‘em a try. I have the large rougher, and the mid size finisher and detailer. In my inexperienced hands I find the large is too large for small items (bear in mind that may be because I’m still a clutz). The mid size tools strike me as a good starting point for most stuff…though I’ve never done pens or ornaments. I did do a very small bowl (about 3” across and 2” deep) and they worked very well on it (the mid size, not the large). I want to echo something Jerry said, most info on these tools I read said they don’t do smooth work; I didn’t find that to be the case. They really do throw some fine curls.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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Julian

1037 posts in 2155 days


#3 posted 08-20-2015 02:57 PM

I have been using carbide cutting, turning tools that I made myself. You can make them as big or small as you need for your style of turning. I do not turn many small pieces but have found that the smaller the diameter you turn the more critical it is to have the cutting edge on the center line. And keep the tool level. I keep my tool rest less than an inch from the wood when using these tools. FYI: Carbide can be sharpened on a diamond plate if you choose but buying the cutters from Capt. Eddie or AZ Carbide only costs about $10/ cutter.

-- Julian

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Vicki

1043 posts in 2809 days


#4 posted 08-20-2015 03:13 PM

@Jerry, yes, the Turnmaster (the name wouldn’t come to me last night). I was thinking of the EWT finisher as the rougher sounds like a fancy combination of a bedan and a roughing gouge and I’m fine with my standard version of those. I got some money from selling my old lathe and scrollsaw and would like to get an EWT or a better chuck and can’t decide which to spring for. @Julian: I don’t have the experience to tap the threads, nor the tools. Do you think Capt. Eddie’s tools are as good as EWT?

-- Vicki on the Eastern Shore of MD

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Julian

1037 posts in 2155 days


#5 posted 08-21-2015 08:31 PM

The tools from Capt. Eddie are not shiny or polished. But that is easily done with sandpaper. EWT are very nicely made but the only part that really matters is the cutter. It’s all a personal choice. The money you save on the tools then can be used for a better chuck. Just my 2 cents.

-- Julian

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Arlin Eastman

3556 posts in 2026 days


#6 posted 08-21-2015 09:20 PM

Vicki

There are a few different kind of carbide cutters out there that do different things.

One set does all the cutting like EWT the Rougher, Smoother, and Detailer then you have the set that hollows the inside.

So I need to know which one you are using. The first set I was talking about you need the rest as close as you can to the wood and since they are considered scrapers you need to have the tool rest adjusted to the tool is just above center to the tool drops down a little so there are no catches.

The second set you have to have the tool rest out a little ways but just only enough to let the widest/biggest part of the tool for stability.

Also like Fred said there are different sizes out there too the big ones for the big pieces of wood and will reach further into the bowl/vase and you need the long handle to control it better, where the middle size is for boxes and things like that. The small ones are mostly for pen turning or for small projects that you can move the tool quickly and moves easily too.

-- Please help me help other Vets click..> http://www.gofundme.com/m1abko.....It is always the right time, to do the right thing.

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Vicki

1043 posts in 2809 days


#7 posted 08-22-2015 01:22 AM

hi,
Arlin: I have the Robert Sorby Turnmaster. Sounds like I need more practice with them. Julian: I like your idea. I ordered the Record Chuck that Rikon is marketing. It has 3 sets of jaws and accepts Nova accessories. I found it for $50 off at Highland. I think I’ll get carbide from Capt. Eddie or Harrison Specialties if I still want them. I’ll be near a Woodcraft next week and hopefully I can get a better ideas of the size I would want. Sounds like mid or small might be more my style.
Thanks guys!

-- Vicki on the Eastern Shore of MD

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hairy

2384 posts in 2997 days


#8 posted 08-22-2015 01:36 PM

This is the one that you need to move the rest back a few inches, to keep the tool flat side on the rest.
http://www.easywoodtools.com/products/easy-hollower/

I have the big one, use it and like it. If you try use it differently, you are not going to like it. It’s for small hollow forms, boxes and such. It helps to have some mass on your side when you’re hanging out long and deep over the tool rest, even for small jobs.

I’ve never turned a pen, but if I do I think a skew chisel would do it all from start to finish. And I’m not bragging about being a skew master, because I definitely am not, I just think it’s the right tool for the job. You could take a square blank to round, plane cut and final scrape with it. But, like I said, I haven’t yet done it.

-- stay thirsty my friends...

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Rick M

7923 posts in 1845 days


#9 posted 08-22-2015 06:53 PM

I have 2 EWTs, the carbides from AZ Carbide are as good, I would say better, than OEM. Also commercial carbides are way, way, way, overpriced. They are about $5 worth of materials to a company buying bulk. You can make your own for about $10-15 each that will perform as well as commercial versions.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Bill White's profile (online now)

Bill White

4456 posts in 3425 days


#10 posted 08-22-2015 08:00 PM

Capt. Eddie’s cutters are top notch.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

7482 posts in 1472 days


#11 posted 08-23-2015 12:45 PM

I’ve been making my own carbide tools (you can see them in my blogs) and I’ve been buying Capt Eddies cutter bits and they are cutting just fine for me.

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

View Vicki's profile

Vicki

1043 posts in 2809 days


#12 posted 08-23-2015 03:01 PM

I’m interested in how hard it is to make them. Can you buy the rods at the box store? Should they be steel or aluminum? How hard is it to tap threads for the screw? Do you have to notch out the shape of the cutter or can you just screw them on? Off to check out Joe’s blog.

Thanks All!!!

-- Vicki on the Eastern Shore of MD

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Nubsnstubs

826 posts in 1195 days


#13 posted 08-23-2015 04:03 PM

I made one swan neck tool so far for carbide. I used round rod, because that’s what I had on hand. I also cut a depression in it at centerline for the cutter because I have access to a machine shop.

Vicki, if you don’t have the access to a machine shop, I would suggest you use square stock in steel. Drill the hole in the appropriate location, and tap it.

Easy woods carbide for the CI5 small round cutter and CI4 triangular cutter is a #4-40 screw. In order to tap that size, you need a #48 drill bit and 4-40 tap. I suppose you could refer to it as a 4-40 plug tap because you are drilling through holes. In this case, I don’t think you need a bottoming tap.

The CI1 uses an 8-32 screw. The tap drill bit would be a #29. The tap of course would be an 8-32.

If you have a drill press and vise, that would be of great benefit to you drilling the holes. Clamp a vise to the drill press table, set the piece in the vise, and drill the hole needed. Remove the drill bit, center the tap over the hole, and with the drill press set at the slowest speed, turn it on and lower the quill. When it starts threading, quickly shut the drill press off, and let it coast to a stop while keeping downward pressure on the quill handle. After the chuck stops rotating, release the tap from the chuck, and either finish tapping by hand or if it tapped all the way, unscrew it from the work piece. I did 481 holes that way until I finally bought myself a tapmatic tool.

If you don’t want to go that route, use a tap handle and do it by hand. Using a drill press as described above ensures a straight tapped hole…........... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson)

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Vicki

1043 posts in 2809 days


#14 posted 08-23-2015 04:21 PM

Thanks Jerry. That’s a big help.

-- Vicki on the Eastern Shore of MD

View Arlin Eastman's profile

Arlin Eastman

3556 posts in 2026 days


#15 posted 08-23-2015 06:19 PM

Hairy

That is what I want to get sometime.

Also Capt Eddie has some nice Carbide but not the very best on the market. Hunter tools has the very best ones by far. I know Capt Eddie and he has helped me and the vets I teach but he gets them in bulk and does not want to make a ton of profit.
One other thing is EWT has more then the square carbide which Eddie does not have and they Do have their own purposes in turning.

-- Please help me help other Vets click..> http://www.gofundme.com/m1abko.....It is always the right time, to do the right thing.

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