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Deck ledger fastening options? Creative ideas anyone?

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Forum topic by LostRidge posted 08-20-2015 02:01 AM 657 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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LostRidge

3 posts in 479 days


08-20-2015 02:01 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question

hey guys, So, interesting day… We have been working on a clients home recently, adding a deck extension, some freestanding outdoor steps and a partition wall with a fancy barn door hardware kit and custom door. One of the other items that is in my scope of work is some structural repairs on the original two level deck. When I made my initial visit to the home (10 yrs old) I found near countless issues that we have been working on with no problem. However, within the first 5 min. Of beings dear the deck I realized all of the 5/8” carriage bolts in the deck ledger were angled up and seemed very loose. Long story short, after prying a couple of bolts from the exterior, finding they were loose we cut an inspection hole in the drywall to find no washer or nut…. Good lord…. So I know the proper fix is to cut drywall, install washers and nuts, torque and all is good. The problem is the drywall and finishes on the inside. I’m basically looking for another creative fastener idea that carries the same specs as a carriage bolt. I realize the obvious ledger lock/grk structural screw option, but the screws aren’t really the same. Anyone know of some super duty Toggler anchors that can fit through the the 1/2” hole, bite and create the friction needed?

Just tossing the worm in, hoping for a bite…


8 replies so far

View 01ntrain's profile

01ntrain

146 posts in 538 days


#1 posted 08-20-2015 03:12 AM

I’m guessing that the nuts and washers vibrated loose after awhile…..no lock washer might do that.

Why not use a very large lag bolt? If you could find one that big…..

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LostRidge

3 posts in 479 days


#2 posted 08-20-2015 11:44 AM



I m guessing that the nuts and washers vibrated loose after awhile…..no lock washer might do that.

Why not use a very large lag bolt? If you could find one that big…..

- 01ntrain

The washers and nuts were never installed by the original contractor…

I don’t want to use lags because they are only good for shear not if the deck started pulling away from the house.

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

1964 posts in 1456 days


#3 posted 08-20-2015 12:04 PM

Fastenal has 1/2 – 13 toggle bolts which might work or a similar type fastener.

I would look at their catalog for several different types.

View jonah's profile

jonah

687 posts in 2766 days


#4 posted 08-20-2015 12:43 PM

Have you thought about restructuring the deck so it’s self-supporting? In these parts at least, people are no longer allowed to hang decks off ledger boards. They have to put footings within 4-6ft of the house to make the deck completely self-supporting. The connection with the ledger is purely to keep the thing attached, not to actually support one end of the deck joists.

You could add a few footings and a beam to the deck near the house and then lag bolts might suffice to keep the thing attached to the house.

Failing that, I would cut into the drywall and do it right. Patching drywall isn’t hard, in the grand scheme of things, and having a deck fail in a few years is a pretty hefty downside to not spending the time/money to fix it right now.

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LostRidge

3 posts in 479 days


#5 posted 08-20-2015 01:21 PM



Have you thought about restructuring the deck so it s self-supporting? In these parts at least, people are no longer allowed to hang decks off ledger boards. They have to put footings within 4-6ft of the house to make the deck completely self-supporting. The connection with the ledger is purely to keep the thing attached, not to actually support one end of the deck joists.

You could add a few footings and a beam to the deck near the house and then lag bolts might suffice to keep the thing attached to the house.

Failing that, I would cut into the drywall and do it right. Patching drywall isn t hard, in the grand scheme of things, and having a deck fail in a few years is a pretty hefty downside to not spending the time/money to fix it right now.

- jonah

In our area it is still okay according to code to attach a deck to the house. I’m thinking we will just do it the right way by going through the drywall and finish installing the carriage bolts. It’s hard to beat that connection….

I guess I was just hoping for a super duty toggle bolt.

Thanks for the help guys!

Brandon

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115207 posts in 3045 days


#6 posted 08-20-2015 02:01 PM

I’ve built at least 200 decks and code requires lags in my area. If you don’t have a lot of wood for lags to hold on to just add support up next to the house so that the deck is basically free standing and add new lags in new locations and even large screws. On repair jobs you don’t always have a lot of options. BTW I have never found the need to remove drywall and use bolts and nuts.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

4859 posts in 2281 days


#7 posted 08-20-2015 05:06 PM

1+ lag bolts. Properly pre-drilled they are very strong.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View jonah's profile

jonah

687 posts in 2766 days


#8 posted 08-21-2015 02:42 AM

Lag bolts are okay, and I think still kosher here, but over time the holes can loosen up and sort of strip themselves out. Especially if you are in a part of the country with frequent and severe freeze/thaw cycles. Not to mention the whole deck will be shrinking as the ~20% moisture content pressure treated lumber shrinks.

You can end up with good shear strength but relatively little pull-away resistance, which is a no-no if there’s 8-12 feet of joist being held up by a ledger board.

Building self-supporting decks and porches is really the only logical solution. I’m amazed it took them so long to change the building codes to require them.

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