LumberJocks

Ridgid jointer back to 110?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by Shane posted 08-19-2015 01:58 PM 703 views 0 times favorited 23 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Shane's profile

Shane

293 posts in 1272 days


08-19-2015 01:58 PM

I found a Ridgid jp06101 for sale for $275 and it looks solid with no rust but he has it wired to 220. I think I can wire it back to 110 easily enough but wondered if I should. Would it be worth the trouble to have a 220 outlet installed in my shop and leave it as is? Cost is a factor, but I have a friend that is an electrician that could help me if it’s worth the time.


23 replies so far

View Luthierman's profile

Luthierman

157 posts in 548 days


#1 posted 08-19-2015 02:08 PM

Just my 2 cents. I am no expert. I have heard that 220 is more efficient to run than 110. I am not entirely sure that is true. I could understand that it could be less taxing on the motor to have a load at a higher voltage, but beyond that, I don’t really know what is going on. An electrical engineer would have to explain that….

Not all motors can be wired for 220 and 110. Double check before you pull the trigger if you truly want the option. It should be listed on the motor housing whether or not it can be done and how to do it.

-- Jesse, West Lafayette, Indiana

View Luthierman's profile

Luthierman

157 posts in 548 days


#2 posted 08-19-2015 02:15 PM

I also should add that all of my tools can be wired for 220, but they aren’t. I don’t notice it at all. The one place I could see where you would want to go to 220 would be if you were running a motor that was 3hp plus on 110. First, it is a chore to try and find a breaker that will handle that kind of load that is a single pole. Also, it seems nuts to run that many watts through such a small gage of wire. At least with 220 it shares the load with 2 conductors.

-- Jesse, West Lafayette, Indiana

View Shane's profile

Shane

293 posts in 1272 days


#3 posted 08-19-2015 02:17 PM

It is set up from the manufacturer to be able to do it. I looked up the manual online and there is a wiring diagram in there for how to set it up for 220 so it wasn’t a hack job. I just wondered if I would gain enough by it to go to the trouble of adding a 220v outlet to my shop. Putting a 110v cord back on it would be much cheaper.

View Luthierman's profile

Luthierman

157 posts in 548 days


#4 posted 08-19-2015 02:24 PM

Yeah, Its definitely cheaper but running wire isn’t that hard either. Just ‘spensive. Plus, if you decided to ever get a big azz cabinet saw or something, you are ready to go. I chose many circuits in my shop instead of 220. My panel was getting full and I didn’t feel like redoing the whole thing to accommodate a larger service. Thats a project for later, like when I build an addition on my house.

-- Jesse, West Lafayette, Indiana

View crank49's profile

crank49

3980 posts in 2431 days


#5 posted 08-19-2015 02:26 PM

What HP is the motor?
If it’s less than 1 3/4 HP it probably can be changed.
A dual voltage motor, (e.g. one that can run on 120V or 240V) will be just as efficient and produce the same HP on either voltage; unless it’s a special, rare, dual HP motor.

That said, your electrical system is where the efficiency gets lost on a lower voltage system.
A 1 3/4 HP motor will pull the maximum amps that can be provided by a standard 120V outlet.
The high amperage will generate some heat in the wires and this is lost energy, plain and simple.
The same motor on 240V will pull half the amps and produce no heating in the wires; more efficient.
The difference is especially noticed on starting from a stop.
All motors require a brief surge of power to get started. This can be as high as 7 times the running load.
The 120V wires, already providing the maximum power they are rated for, have an especially hard time providing this required surge.

-- Michael: Hillary has a long list of accomplishments, though most DAs would refer to them as felonies.

View daddywoofdawg's profile

daddywoofdawg

1010 posts in 1035 days


#6 posted 08-19-2015 02:27 PM

Do you want 220 in your shop,are there upgrades of tools you may get down the road that may be 220? 3hp table saw,big band saw,etc. from what I have found labor doesn’t get cheaper down the road.Do you have a dryer in the shop area? If so you already have 220 there you just need another outlet.

View Julian's profile

Julian

1034 posts in 2151 days


#7 posted 08-19-2015 02:36 PM

Having a 240V circuit is a nice option to have for large machines in the future as others have mentioned. If you have an electrician friend, I would install at least one circuit. It doesn’t get cheaper the longer you wait. My 2cents.

-- Julian

View Shane's profile

Shane

293 posts in 1272 days


#8 posted 08-19-2015 02:38 PM

No I don’t have it, and I don’t foresee getting it any time soon. I also don’t plan on upgrading to any massive tools in the near future as I don’t have the funds to do so.

Sounds like I should just put it back to 110 for now and then if I ever have to upgrade at some point I could wire it back. I really need to stick with the cheapest option for now unless there is a REALLY good reason not to. From what you guys have said it seems like it’s a nice thing but not necessary.

View Luthierman's profile

Luthierman

157 posts in 548 days


#9 posted 08-19-2015 02:42 PM


it s a nice thing but not necessary.

- Burgels

This.

-- Jesse, West Lafayette, Indiana

View gtbuzz's profile

gtbuzz

427 posts in 1902 days


#10 posted 08-19-2015 03:23 PM

If you had 220, I’d say use it as-is, but seeing as to how you don’t, I’d rewire back to 110 – it came from the factory that way. I’ve got the same jointer myself and also have easily accessible 220 outlets, but have never felt the need to convert. It will run fine on a 15 amp circuit if you’ve got nothing else going at the same time.

FWIW, I think $275 is just a hair high for that jointer. $250 would be better, and $200 would be a pretty good price. Having said that, I’ve noticed jointer prices seem to vary wildly across the country so your mileage may vary.

View Shane's profile

Shane

293 posts in 1272 days


#11 posted 08-19-2015 03:42 PM

Thanks for the tip. I have seen several around here for $300 and one for $350 recently so $275 felt like a good deal. He said his price was firm and it looks well taken care of so I’m not going to quibble over $25.

View PaulHWood's profile

PaulHWood

335 posts in 1713 days


#12 posted 08-19-2015 03:43 PM

agreed, paid 225 brand new from Home Depot

wired for 220 as that machine dims lights at 120. If the panel is in your shop, not hard to add a 220 circuit


If you had 220, I d say use it as-is, but seeing as to how you don t, I d rewire back to 110 – it came from the factory that way. I ve got the same jointer myself and also have easily accessible 220 outlets, but have never felt the need to convert. It will run fine on a 15 amp circuit if you ve got nothing else going at the same time.

FWIW, I think $275 is just a hair high for that jointer. $250 would be better, and $200 would be a pretty good price. Having said that, I ve noticed jointer prices seem to vary wildly across the country so your mileage may vary.

- gtbuzz


-- -Paul, South Carolina Structural Engineer by trade, Crappy Woodworker by choice

View distrbd's profile

distrbd

2227 posts in 1907 days


#13 posted 08-19-2015 03:48 PM

I wish my shop was wired for 240V as well as 120V, if I knew a friend who could put a couple of 24ov outlets at low cost, I would do it in a heartbeat, you may not have any plans to upgrade your tools at this time but if you do in the future you would be glad if the 240v outlets were available.

As for your Ridgid jp06101, I have that jointer and it runs perfectly on 120V,whether I have a 240v plug or not,I would not bother changing it to 240V. I would save the 240V for when I upgrade to 3-5 hP table saw /stationary planer/bandsaw or for when I buy a Mig welder.

-- Ken from Ontario, Canada

View johnstoneb's profile

johnstoneb

2143 posts in 1633 days


#14 posted 08-19-2015 03:48 PM

Just convert back to 110. It’s cheaper and you won’t see any difference in performance. It uses the same amount of power. Down the road if you get more tools that are 220 you can wire the shop then and convert the jointer if you want.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

View Shane's profile

Shane

293 posts in 1272 days


#15 posted 08-19-2015 03:49 PM

Unfortunately that option no longer exists as they are $599 through Home Depot now.


agreed, paid 225 brand new from Home Depot

- PaulHWood

showing 1 through 15 of 23 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com