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Forum topic by Weenis posted 08-18-2015 10:01 PM 984 views 0 times favorited 21 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Weenis

4 posts in 473 days


08-18-2015 10:01 PM

Hi all.

This is my plan and would like your thoughts. After watching many videos and alot of research, i’ve decided that building my own custom kitchen cabinetry is something i can tackle. I was quoted $15,000 3-4 years ago for cabinets, counter top and installation. My thought here is by doing it myself, i can buy all of the tools i need to do this and have the tools pay for themselves and maybe even save money on top of that. I have all of the space i need and there is no deadline. I plan on starting this next year. I’m hoping to get some deals on tools over the holidays.

I plan on spending around $3000 on power tools, not set in stone. Table saw,router table and router,planer,jointer,and misc. stuff like clamps jigs and such. I have a miter saw and some other tools already.

Thoughts and suggestions greatly appreciated.


21 replies so far

View Woodmaster1's profile

Woodmaster1

736 posts in 2048 days


#1 posted 08-18-2015 10:07 PM

Check out Sommerfeld’s YouTube videos. You will get a lot of useful information. They are sales videos but you get great ideas.
.

View DrDirt's profile

DrDirt

4167 posts in 3203 days


#2 posted 08-18-2015 10:20 PM

I think it will be close to even if you are starting from “ground zero” needing compressors nailers, sandpaper… just a gazillion things that take years to accumulate.
Good materials (not box store plywood) are pricey. expect ply to run 70+ bucks a sheet.
Nice self closing drawer slides can run 50-60 a pair.

Might consider farming out the finishing to either an auto place that will shoot them with Catalyzed lacquer, or even a cabinet shop as getting everything sprayed well is hard. they will be set up for that.

I don’[t think you will lose money, but the savings are going to be limited. But at the end- you have a shop and a bunch of experience.

-- 'Political correctness is fascism pretending to be manners' ~George Carlin

View JAAune's profile

JAAune

1636 posts in 1778 days


#3 posted 08-18-2015 10:59 PM

Expect at least $6,000 in materials for a mid-sized kitchen and that’s not including counter tops. So like others have said, you’ll probably end up with good tools but still spend about the same money.

Save yourself a ton of money by getting pre-made doors and drawer boxes. The tools and equipment to build those plus the cost of wood will probably run higher than just buying them.

Pre-finished maple plywood will save a lot of time and it’s far more durable than anything a hobby woodworker can spray or brush on.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

View Pezking7p's profile

Pezking7p

3097 posts in 1112 days


#4 posted 08-18-2015 11:13 PM

I built my kitchen (see my projects) with about….maybe $2000 in tools including compressors, nailers, screw guns, saws, planet/jounter, etc etc etc. you don’t need fine tools to make cabinets. But you do need a lot of tools.

I spent a total of $2700 on my cabinets, including $500 for a very fancy corner cabinet pullout. You can see what all this entails in my project page. I did everything myself and sprayed catalyzed lacquer in my front yard using a $75 hvlp gun. You could easily spend more if you go with very high end hardware but I found it too expensive and so far I’m loving the cheap slides I bought.

I say go for it, but do some smaller projects in the meantime to get all your tools dialed in and to get some practice, you’re going to need work benches and tables, a few jigs, etc.

Good luck and please feel free to message me any time with questions or whatever.

-- -Dan

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Weenis

4 posts in 473 days


#5 posted 08-18-2015 11:39 PM

Thanks for the replies guys. I forgot to mention, i also have a 60 gal 6.5 hp compressor sitting in the garage collecting dust. I got it when my father passed and never thought i’d really have a use for it, until now. Is that big enough for a woodworking shop?

View DW833's profile

DW833

190 posts in 1343 days


#6 posted 08-18-2015 11:45 PM

If you have a local woodcraft, check with them. One in Orlando has two weekend cabinet classes I hear are good.

View Clarkie's profile

Clarkie

380 posts in 1302 days


#7 posted 08-18-2015 11:54 PM

I have to agree with Woodmaster, watch the you tube videos of Sommerfeld, then send for a catalog. I am in the process of doing my own kitchen over and the router table Sommerfeld offers is absolutely the best I have seen. Sommerfeld does a tongue and groove with his cabinets, it works very well. The drawer slides are available from him also and less than 50.00 a set. The router bits are very well made also, and the t&g and others sets are the same height, so once you set up for one the other is automatically the right height. The compressor you have is more than adequate, have fun and make some dust. I went with birch cabinet grade plywood and by buying quantity got a very good deal on the price, and by quantity I only mean 6 sheets to begin with, so be sure to ask first if you can get a better price for more than a couple sheets. Where I’m located we have a company called, Kitchen Cabinet Supply.

View MT_Stringer's profile

MT_Stringer

2851 posts in 2692 days


#8 posted 08-19-2015 12:08 AM

Welcome aboard. There is a lot of information on this site that may prove helpful to you.


Hi all.

This is my plan and would like your thoughts. After watching many videos and alot of research, i ve decided that building my own custom kitchen cabinetry is something i can tackle. I was quoted $15,000 3-4 years ago for cabinets, counter top and installation. My thought here is by doing it myself, i can buy all of the tools i need to do this and have the tools pay for themselves and maybe even save money on top of that. I have all of the space i need and there is no deadline. I plan on starting this next year. I m hoping to get some deals on tools over the holidays.

I plan on spending around $3000 on power tools, not set in stone. Table saw,router table and router,planer,jointer,and misc. stuff like clamps jigs and such. I have a miter saw and some other tools already.

Thoughts and suggestions greatly appreciated.

- Weenis

I have a couple of suggestions for you to consider.

1) Check out the videos on You Tube by Kris Reynolds. His videos are easy to watch and no BS, camera wobble, etc that seems to plague a lot of people that post videos.

Like you, I watched a lot of videos, and finally decided I could adopt his basic workflow. And I did. I use his methods often for projects including our buffet and our kitchen remodel and mom's kitchen cabinets. The changing station was also built using the same methods.

2) Consider outsourcing your doors and drawer fronts. You can save a lot of time and spend your energy on other things like building drawers!

3) A table saw, joiner and planer and a router will make your job a whole lot easier. Add an 18 ga brad nailer and a good cordless screw driver and you should be all set. That is unless you plan to build face frames using pocket screw construction, then a Kreg jig would be beneficial. Mine gets used a lot!

4) If you have a local source for hardwood, buying it 4/4 rough and milling it yourself will allow you to control the widths and thickness of the finished material.

Having said all that, all of my work is done in a one car garage which also has a washer/dryer/freezer and storage shelving. But, I manage.

One last note. I built all of the cabinets for the buffet, kitchen and moms kitchen before I learned how to use Sketchup! Just a pencil and a sketch pad…and a tape measure…and a whole lot of measuring.

Good luck.
Mike

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

View Weenis's profile

Weenis

4 posts in 473 days


#9 posted 08-19-2015 12:11 AM

I have seen Sommerfeld’s videos and will probably use his method. might even buy one of his router table sets. They seem abit pricey though. I also plan on using some cabinet making software before jumping into this to get a ballpark figure on the cost of all the materials. I’ve been messing around with sketchup. It seems pretty cool but there may be better software for what i’m needing.

Plan on using prefinished baltic birch plywood for the carcasses. Solid wood frames,doors,drawers. Not sure what species yet. Thinking maple,oak or cherry. Will also price premade doors and drawers.

View jmartel's profile

jmartel

6565 posts in 1611 days


#10 posted 08-19-2015 12:32 AM

Something to consider, but it might be worth looking into buying a tracksaw as well for the plywood. Wrestling with 4×8 sheets of plywood on a Tablesaw sucks. I spent $275 on my Grizzly tracksaw and it is great. I used it to break down sheets for the entertainment center I just built. If you are careful with layout, you don’t even need to use the tablesaw to final size them. Festool is probably the best tracksaw that would be considered by a home user, but also the priciest.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

7171 posts in 2038 days


#11 posted 08-19-2015 01:26 AM

Welcome to LumberJocks!

Good advice above and have fun on your journey!

Maybe make some garage cabinets and hang the uppers and build some base cabs for your
tools and such. Practice making drawers and get some time in adjusting the slides and leveling
things out.

:)

View BadJoints's profile

BadJoints

103 posts in 549 days


#12 posted 08-19-2015 01:38 AM

+1 to what waho609 said. You will learn a LOT by building a few garage cabinets first. It will allow you to figure out how it really goes together and what jigs will make construction much easier. It will also be a great confidence builder before you start cutting expensive sheet goods.

-- Producing furniture grade firewood since 1984

View Weenis's profile

Weenis

4 posts in 473 days


#13 posted 08-19-2015 01:59 AM

Thanks for all of the advice everyone. Building some garage cabinets first is a great idea. I also have a handful of closet organizers to build as well as a surround for the fireplace. Those will be some good practice.

View Woodmaster1's profile

Woodmaster1

736 posts in 2048 days


#14 posted 08-19-2015 03:24 AM

I built my own router table and fence. The sommerfeld table looks great, but I spent less than 100.00 on building my own. The router bit sets are very good. I am in the process of building cabinets and everything works as advertised. I had trouble getting things to match up and Mark Sommerfeld was the one who called me back. It was my error not the router bits.

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2190 posts in 941 days


#15 posted 08-19-2015 10:11 AM

Have you decided on the type of cabs?

I used the system 32 method, aka, frameless.

Check out the book by Danny Proulx.

Not building face frames is faster, easier, and opens more possibilities like slide out base shelves.

I did the same thing you are doing. I had just under $5K in materials and the kitchen designer we used estimated my kitchen at $25K through her shop.

I ended up with an 8” jointer and a 20” planer and a bunch of smaller power tools.

Good luck.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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