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Floating shelves anchoring.

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Forum topic by Stewbot posted 08-18-2015 09:29 PM 738 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Stewbot

195 posts in 549 days


08-18-2015 09:29 PM

A woman wants me to re-do a hallway linen closet and among other things wants me to replace the existing shelves which are supported by a standard ledger (lack of a better term)running the perimeter of the closet, with floating shelves. This seems easy enough, however when I went to look at the job, I noticed the rear wall of the closet is not a stud wall, but a sheet of plywood. I’ve seen this before in houses I’ve worked on, often times two closets back to back will share a wall, that is actually just 3/4” plywood.

Normally in this situation I would anchor into studs to support the shelf, I’m worried that the 3/4” ply won’t have enough meat to really hold onto the shelf and its weight.

To try and illustrate the situation some more, the shelves will be about 6-8” deep and about18”- 24” long (these dimensions might change, I just looked at the job today and a finalized plan is not yet in order). I’ve explained to her my concerns about the integrity of the shelf, or the lack of it due to this little dilemma but she is adamant I give it a shot. She does not plan on storing her anvil collection atop the shelf, but more so lightweight ‘linen’ closet items. I have free reign on the design of the shelves and she is pretty laid back about the situation (despite being sure of the fact that she wants floating shelves with no visible supports) but I figured I would get some opinions. I’m sure I can come up with something eventually, but could use some extra insight.

First off, am I explaining the situation clearly enough?
Depending on the anchoring system I use, does anyone feel that the 3/4” plywood would be able to support both the floating shelf And fairly lightweight items?
Any ideas on anchoring techniques or shelf construction?

Thanks for reading.

-- Hoopty scoop?


5 replies so far

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AandCstyle

2572 posts in 1722 days


#1 posted 08-18-2015 11:30 PM

I don’t know if this will work or not, but you might consider a torsion box shelf attached to the ply with a French cleat. However, you don’t know if the next owner of the house might decide to store his/her anvil collection there or not. I suppose, you could knock together a test in your shop to determine the potential load bearing ability of your design if you choose to go this route. HTH

-- Art

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Stewbot

195 posts in 549 days


#2 posted 08-19-2015 12:56 AM



I don t know if this will work or not, but you might consider a torsion box shelf attached to the ply with a French cleat. However, you don t know if the next owner of the house might decide to store his/her anvil collection there or not. I suppose, you could knock together a test in your shop to determine the potential load bearing ability of your design if you choose to go this route. HTH

- AandCstyle

Hah! I was thinking the same thing, regarding the anvil collection. I typically over build things so I haven’t been too fond of the idea to build it solely to hold linens. Whether I ever heard about it or not, it’s embarrassing to have something fail littered with your finger prints. You are right though, whatever I built, a simple shop experiment should take place.

-- Hoopty scoop?

View Daruc's profile

Daruc

459 posts in 597 days


#3 posted 08-19-2015 01:16 AM

Use a little adhesive and, it’s my opinion, you could put anvils on if you wanted.
If you don’t want to screw through the top some nails would do the trick as well.

(Shown without sides)

-- -

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Stewbot

195 posts in 549 days


#4 posted 08-19-2015 01:33 AM

Thanks woodust, that looks like a good option.

-- Hoopty scoop?

View wunderaa's profile

wunderaa

243 posts in 1667 days


#5 posted 08-19-2015 03:38 AM

Used an open-bottom torsion box of solid oak for mine and used lag bolts into studs before screwing bottoms on. You can stand on them. Lots of options!

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