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Heating and Rustproofing in a Detached Garage Shop

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Forum topic by scottb posted 11-03-2009 03:09 AM 1327 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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scottb

3648 posts in 3792 days


11-03-2009 03:09 AM

Topic tags/keywords: rust heating garage shop

After several years of working out of the basement, and not having to deal so much with issues of keeping warm, and the moisture level down. I’m transitioning to a large garage – rental, so I can’t really do much to the building, and after the overwhelming and often conflicting advice out on the wiley www, I figured I really should just ask the woodworkers I know and trust…

So, how do y’all deal with keeping rust at bay, and staying comfortable in your detached garage shop? Keeping warm enough to work safely in the winter months.
Also wondering about keeping glues and finishes from getting ruined from the temperature fluctuations all winter.

I’m expecting to be working out of this garage for at least a year and a half, so I’ll have at least two winters to deal with, but dont want to do anything the landlord might not approve of, or spend too much money on something I can’t take with me to the next house.

How awesome is my wife to give me the entire space, and not even request/demand I leave enough room for her car?!

Thanks for any and all tips, tricks and advice of what to do, or what not to do.

-- I am always doing what I cannot do yet, in order to learn how to do it. - Van Gogh -- http://blanchardcreative.etsy.com -- http://snbcreative.wordpress.com/


12 replies so far

View RobS's profile

RobS

1334 posts in 3772 days


#1 posted 11-03-2009 05:19 AM

Sorry bro, can’t help with those frigid temps…I’m in the garage but only get below freezing about 5 times a year, if that.. good luck..

-- Rob (A) Waxahachie,TX

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ChunkyC

856 posts in 2720 days


#2 posted 11-03-2009 05:49 AM

It sounds to me like an electric heater is in your very near future. I would get a “portable” unit with a built in thermostat. Set it for 60 when you not in the shop and turn it up to a comfortable level while working. You’ll be surprised by how little of a heater you’ll actually need to keep it warm.

I’ve made an assumption that the garage is insulated. If you not, you’ll have to insulate or spend mega $$ keeping it warm. You may even want to add some additional insulation if it already has some. A round or two with a caulking gun will save you big $ too.

-- Chunk's Workshop pictures: http://spadfest.rcspads.com/thumbnails.php?album=135

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scottb

3648 posts in 3792 days


#3 posted 11-03-2009 06:05 AM

Yes Chunk, The walls are insulated, but not the ceiling. I suppose I should pick up a roll or two a week until I have a nice cozy space. better spending the money once, than every month?

Thanks Rob ;P
but what is your AC like all summer down there in the heat, I mean heart of Texas?

-- I am always doing what I cannot do yet, in order to learn how to do it. - Van Gogh -- http://blanchardcreative.etsy.com -- http://snbcreative.wordpress.com/

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115202 posts in 3043 days


#4 posted 11-03-2009 06:12 AM

Hey Scott
If you can’t keep the garage warm you can make a warm box to put glues and finishes in and just add a low voltage bulb to keep the temperature up high enough to keep it from freezing. You just have to be careful not to let it get to warm in there so it’s not a fire hazard, Some guys use old fridges. If you get it all insulated you might get by with an electric heater while your out there working.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Douglas Bordner's profile

Douglas Bordner

4012 posts in 3529 days


#5 posted 11-03-2009 06:18 AM

I have a drafty garage, and have gotten by with a salamander (forced air propane heater). It is certainly less than ideal, but it does get things manageable if you run it for an hour before going out to work. In the fall, I put all my water-based adhesives and finishes in a duffel I hang by the back door, and take out with me to work.

I also use Renaissance Wax on every cast iron table, and make sure all cast iron surfaces are clear before shutting the lights off. There is still a dovetail shaped discoloration on my bandsaw table of a board I left overnight. This is especially important during the spring thaw, when the tables will sweat and will rust up overnight unless waxed.

I second the wife accolade. I can move everything aside and get Pam’s car inside for rough weather (hail, big snow) if need be.

Bonne chance, M. Blanchard.

-- "Bordnerizing" perfectly good lumber for over a decade.

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tooldad

660 posts in 3180 days


#6 posted 11-03-2009 06:20 AM

Insulating the walls and not the ceiling is about like wearing a thick pants, and only a t shirt in the middle of winter. I had that same situation to the garage of the house I moved into. Detached 24×24 with r-13 walls only. I installed a 70k btu ceiling propane heater. It ran every 5 min keeping the garage at 55 when it was 20-30 outside. Once I put in 8-12” inches of blow-in in the attic, it runs every 20-30 min. Gaps and lack of insulation are killers to keeping warm.

View scottb's profile

scottb

3648 posts in 3792 days


#7 posted 11-03-2009 06:21 AM

I remember seeing a plan for turning an old fridge into a kiln. How low wattage a bulb are we talking to keep things from getting too warm? or does ventilation need to be considered?

-- I am always doing what I cannot do yet, in order to learn how to do it. - Van Gogh -- http://blanchardcreative.etsy.com -- http://snbcreative.wordpress.com/

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12642 posts in 3563 days


#8 posted 11-03-2009 06:25 AM

What is this freezing / rust thing your asking about? (The answer is obvious, move to sunny CA)....

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115202 posts in 3043 days


#9 posted 11-03-2009 06:29 AM

Scott
You will have to play with the size of the bulb based on how much you store in the warm box . I would start with a 40watt and put a thermometer in it and keep checking what the temperature is through out the day until you get a constant that you want. If you find it’s getting to warn lower the wattage or vent the box.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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scottb

3648 posts in 3792 days


#10 posted 11-03-2009 06:31 AM

Ah yes Wayne, the simplest answers are always the best!

-- I am always doing what I cannot do yet, in order to learn how to do it. - Van Gogh -- http://blanchardcreative.etsy.com -- http://snbcreative.wordpress.com/

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12642 posts in 3563 days


#11 posted 11-03-2009 06:33 AM

How you been? I still wear my handplane tee shirt every now and then.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View John Ormsby's profile

John Ormsby

1283 posts in 3202 days


#12 posted 11-03-2009 06:35 AM

I would suggest you put some R-19 minimum in the ceiling. R-30 is prefered. ut the insulation 90 degrees to the joist for a fast install and it will keep them from falling through the joists. Run a 1×4 about 16” from the side walls to support the ends of the insulation. You will be much happier with an insulated shop. Do the walls with R-13.

You can you West Systems epoxy as a glue for colder temps. It may be more expensive, but will do the job.

A small heater will get the job done if you insulate. The energy savings will pay for the insulation the first season.

I have a climate controlled shop and do not have the problem uf rust. I just use talcum powder on my machines and they are in like new condition always. NEVER leave any wood on a machine for any length of time. It will trap moisture and leave marks, as has been already stated here.

-- Oldworld, Fair Oaks, Ca

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