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Forum topic by KatieBot posted 08-18-2015 12:10 AM 893 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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KatieBot

4 posts in 473 days


08-18-2015 12:10 AM

Topic tags/keywords: electrical wiring electrical components furniture references resources

Does anyone know of a good reference resource about how to safely wire components into furniture?

I’m wanting to make a couple of nightstands that have some electrical components. Namely, I want to have an integrated light coming out of the surface of the night stand. In addition, I’d like to have a couple of usb outlets, a standard 110 outlet (for charging phones/ipods/devices, etc) and a dimmer switch for the built in light.

I was thinking that I could very easily run a wire up one of the legs to the charging bank and then run another cable from there up to the light through the dimmer switch. I have done some home electrical before, so I understand how to wire the circuits.

Mostly I’m wondering if I need to incorporate any sort of metal shielding into the piece and what kind of wire I can get away with using. Also, if there are any components available that are specific to this purpose vs. home wall units and where I could get them from.

I haven’t seen much furniture that has these features, but if anyone knows of anything that currently exists that I could look at for reference, that would be helpful as well. For the most part the most that I’ve seen people do is just a simple lamp with lamp wire and a switch.


10 replies so far

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mahdee

3547 posts in 1227 days


#1 posted 08-18-2015 01:21 AM

There are conference tables with phone jacks, lights, plug-ins for electricity and so on. Simplest thing are the wooden lamps. I don’t think they use conduit on conference tables. Probably go and check one out to get a better idea.

-- earthartandfoods.com

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KatieBot

4 posts in 473 days


#2 posted 08-18-2015 02:49 AM

Most conference tables that I’ve seen just have a plastic bank inset into the middle of the table and then plug into a floor outlet that is situated directly under the center of the table leaving a mess of cords underneath the table. I’m looking for a more elegant solution that would hide the cables within the table itself.

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mahdee

3547 posts in 1227 days


#3 posted 08-18-2015 11:18 AM

I see. Then you can make a false space in the furniture just for that purpose where your surge protector, and other plug-ins will be locates and the only thing visible is the one plug-in that comes out of the middle. Most outlets are 12” or so from the floor. So, if you make the main plug-in come from that level, it will be least visible. A vent/door for easy access for repair would be good to have too.

-- earthartandfoods.com

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KatieBot

4 posts in 473 days


#4 posted 08-19-2015 09:17 PM

I guess my question was then does that false space need to have any sort of shielding if I’m hooking up multiple components. When you’re doing home electrical, you need to make all connections in a box of some sort, plastic or metal. Would I need to have this same sort of thing in furniture as well?

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3547 posts in 1227 days


#5 posted 08-20-2015 12:36 AM

I think your best bet is a outlet strip with a surge protector. I would make all the connection a as a plug-in. Otherwise, for sure you will need a junction box of sort which would be messy.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

1108 posts in 2404 days


#6 posted 08-20-2015 03:57 AM

Take a look at lamp repair kits and techniques on line. You’ll see the kits are just tubes with threaded ends, a couple thin nuts and a light socket with a switch.

To use the kit, you just run a standard, two conductor cord, probably about sixteen gauge, up through the pipe and connect it to the socket. The other end has a plug. Once connected, put a bulb in and you’re ready to go.

People have been making lamps for decades. That’s what you are attempting to do too. It’s just one of your own design.

Aside from the standard rules for connecting wires (e.g., wires go on the screws clockwise and the wide band is neutral), you just have consider positioning so the lamp wont come in contact with combustibles. Of course, you can reduce wattage, thus heat, by using LED lighting.

View nailbanger2's profile

nailbanger2

1041 posts in 2603 days


#7 posted 08-20-2015 04:06 AM

LED lights are great… unless you want to dim them, then you need specific ones that I found difficult to find. It’s weird, some go all stroboscopic on you.

-- Wish I were Norm's Nephew

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

5764 posts in 946 days


#8 posted 08-20-2015 04:11 AM

Just a bunch of thoughts.

110v receptacles, dimmers, and any splices need to be in a junction box. Lamp holder is ok as long as the splices are within the sockets enclosure. Preferably soldered.

I’d use sjo cord (tool cord pretty much) to go from receptacle to lamp or wherever.

I’d use a 6’ or greater molded appliance cord to the 110v recept.

I’ve seen some new receptacles that have 2 USB ports built into them, eliminating the need for seperate devices.

Use at your own risk.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View KatieBot's profile

KatieBot

4 posts in 473 days


#9 posted 08-20-2015 04:11 AM

I’m trying to wire more than just a lamp. I want to incorporate USB and standard 110 outlets as well. If it were just a lamp I’d have less to think about.

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

5764 posts in 946 days


#10 posted 08-20-2015 04:21 AM

Building around and trying to incorporate the junction boxes tha hard part.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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