LumberJocks

A tale of wanting more hand tools.

  • Advertise with us

« back to Hand Tools forum

Forum topic by JohnChung posted 08-14-2015 04:06 AM 1033 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View JohnChung's profile

JohnChung

372 posts in 1540 days


08-14-2015 04:06 AM

Here is a rant. Chip in with your experience.

When I started wood working I had a silly out of tune chinese handplane. I soon learnt that it was the tool at fault. That is when I went down the long journey collecting LV and LN. I was a happy camper but the output was very low. I store my stuff away when not in use so pulling out the tools for a project is kind of a pain.

Each project I did with a hand tool especially with a hand plane was beautiful in it’s own right. I have not made complicated stuff due to the lack of a dedicated workshop.

Now comes the sad part. I need to make kitchen cabinets and in build storage shelves. After many debates of using a jigsaw cutting down plywood I invested and bought a track saw and makita SP6000. Cut plywood like a dream after the correction is made. It is not exactly full proof for setting it up. I had no sense of accomplishment using plywood or a circular saw. I don’t think this would change if I had a table saw. Kind of depress as it is with modern day material or techniques. But I do appreciate the speed of knocking up stuff. Very quick as it is.

After so much plywood dust NO wonder so many like shavings.


11 replies so far

View jmartel's profile

jmartel

6575 posts in 1616 days


#1 posted 08-14-2015 04:42 AM

I feel the same way. I just did a big entertainment system out of plywood. I am eager to get back into solid wood and using hand tools. I just started another project actually, which will be back to more of what I like. But unfortunately the project after that is more cabinet work.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

5765 posts in 952 days


#2 posted 08-14-2015 05:06 AM

well, you just gotta try to add the touches when you can to keep you sane.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View Mattyboy's profile

Mattyboy

50 posts in 544 days


#3 posted 08-14-2015 03:09 PM

I guess plywood is a necessary evil in many projects, although some would disagree. I much prefer solid wood wherever possible.

-- Matt, Northern CA

View sawdust703's profile

sawdust703

270 posts in 886 days


#4 posted 08-15-2015 06:43 AM

Might I ask Mr. John, without a “dedicated shop” as you put it, just where you planning to build them shiny new cabinets? I understand your pain in many ways. My shop was in our basement for the first 11 years of my woodworking. The room was 8’ wide x 12’ long. As I bought tools, the bigger ones we put on casters so I could move them out of the room & out of my way. Now my shop is 260 sq. Ft. & I’ve got some thinking room, & room for all our tools in the same room. Anyhow, I very rarely use plywood for ANYTHING. Even scroll work. I’ve went to using refurbished wood in projects. What I’m not able to re saw, if necessary, I either hand plane or run through my own planer to the thickness I need. I’ve found that refurbished wood in a project is a damn sight better looking than plywood. There is always a way to get things done. I don’t use hand tools a lot, either, as my main fascination is scroll saw work. But, I’m a self taught woodworker, and take a lot of pride in my work.

-- Sawdust703

View JohnChung's profile

JohnChung

372 posts in 1540 days


#5 posted 08-15-2015 10:20 AM

@Sawdust703

I have a house to work on. The house is currently empty. The whole house serves as my workshop. Once all the furniture are loaded. I am taking a 9×11 room for a mini workshop (hand tools). If a bigger project is needed I have another room to use. So that will be 2 rooms as it is for my equipment. Which is a lot. :)

I don’t plan to have the planer or Table saw. Big stuff like the drill press, lathe and band saw will be apart of my new workshop.

View canadianchips's profile

canadianchips

2358 posts in 2463 days


#6 posted 08-15-2015 12:32 PM

You are correct when you talk about “modern day materials”
MDF, Melamine, OSB, all sheet good made from resins and small particles. Very hard on sharp saw blades. Very dusty when cutting with power tools. Todays cabinets are really customized furniture. Looks really nice, will it last long time ? Probably not, new people who buy the home will change it to their style.
I keep looking at track saws, not sure I would replace my table saws with one YET ! ”Although I have NO where to use my table saw” I am living in apartment.

-- "My mission in life - make everyone smile !"

View timbertailor's profile

timbertailor

1592 posts in 890 days


#7 posted 08-15-2015 12:48 PM

You will begin to appreciate that there are many woodworking philosophies out there. Depends on where you started, what you were exposed to, and what you want to learn.

It is a journey that I hope to never end.

-- Brad, Texas, https://www.youtube.com/user/tonkatoytruck/feed

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2198 posts in 947 days


#8 posted 08-15-2015 01:20 PM

I can defintely relate. After building just one really big kitchen, I got so burned out on cabinet building, that I couldn’t build a cabinet for a couple years.

WADR to the cabinet builders out ther, I think what you’re experiencing is the notion that there is a real difference between cabinet making and furniture making (aka fine ww’ing).

I think it is because it is a utilitarian, methodical effort based on a methodical production-type work. It is focused on efficiency of assembly, pragmatism and ergonomics. Not to say there is no skill involved of course there is, but because of the nature of the work and the materials, it is largely machine based.

Nowadays we have to be careful to wear a respirator because the Chinese plywood glues are toxic.

I think the biggest thing about hand work is you are more connected to the wood. Studying the wood, reading the grain, tuning your tools, all these things have a unique ability to satisfy and relate us to the masters of ages past.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

16243 posts in 3684 days


#9 posted 08-15-2015 02:04 PM

I make a lot of purely decorative boxes and turnings. I enjoy the creative process, working with exotic and beautiful woods, and the joy of ending up with a lovely piece that can be admired for many years.

On the other side of the coin, though, I also get a lot of fun and satisfaction out of turning a piece of plywood (and even some -gasp- screws) into something functional like a storage cabinet or a jig.

They are two very different woodworking processes, but I like ‘em both!

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View JohnChung's profile

JohnChung

372 posts in 1540 days


#10 posted 08-15-2015 02:59 PM



You are correct when you talk about “modern day materials”
MDF, Melamine, OSB, all sheet good made from resins and small particles. Very hard on sharp saw blades. Very dusty when cutting with power tools. Todays cabinets are really customized furniture. Looks really nice, will it last long time ? Probably not, new people who buy the home will change it to their style.
I keep looking at track saws, not sure I would replace my table saws with one YET ! ”Although I have NO where to use my table saw” I am living in apartment.

- canadianchips

This guy seems to work well without a TS.
https://www.youtube.com/user/MrBigerock.

View JohnChung's profile

JohnChung

372 posts in 1540 days


#11 posted 08-15-2015 03:02 PM



I can defintely relate. After building just one really big kitchen, I got so burned out on cabinet building, that I couldn t build a cabinet for a couple years.

WADR to the cabinet builders out ther, I think what you re experiencing is the notion that there is a real difference between cabinet making and furniture making (aka fine ww ing).

I think it is because it is a utilitarian, methodical effort based on a methodical production-type work. It is focused on efficiency of assembly, pragmatism and ergonomics. Not to say there is no skill involved of course there is, but because of the nature of the work and the materials, it is largely machine based.

Nowadays we have to be careful to wear a respirator because the Chinese plywood glues are toxic.

I think the biggest thing about hand work is you are more connected to the wood. Studying the wood, reading the grain, tuning your tools, all these things have a unique ability to satisfy and relate us to the masters of ages past.

- rwe2156

With hand tools there is a definite wood connection. All that sweat and effort you do understand the wood itself. That will translate to a long life furniture. Of course good joinery is needed to.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com