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Removing Jewelry Box Lids, What Blade?

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Forum topic by Blackie_ posted 08-12-2015 07:47 PM 922 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Blackie_

4531 posts in 1973 days


08-12-2015 07:47 PM

What kind of table saw blade is best for removing the lid from a jewelry box?

What I have in my shop

1. Woodworker II 40T 1/8” kerf flat teeth for finger joints.

2. Avanti Pro 60T Fine Finish

3. Oshlun 80T Fine Finish

These are the blades I have to work with other than a couple 32T general purpose blades.

-- Randy - If I'm not on LJ's then I'm making Saw Dust. Please feel free to visit my store location at http://www.facebook.com/randy.blackstock.custom.wood.designs


16 replies so far

View Edwardnorton's profile

Edwardnorton

181 posts in 1387 days


#1 posted 08-12-2015 08:12 PM

I use a blade that has 100 TPI & have had no problems with it. You can find the blades I use here:

http://www.amazon.com/Concord-Blades-ACB1000T100HP-10-Inch-Non-Ferrous/dp/B00LFCMTHY/ref=sr_1_16?s=hi&ie=UTF8&qid=1439410173&sr=1-16&keywords=10+table+saw+blade

-- EdwardNorton

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

7697 posts in 2303 days


#2 posted 08-12-2015 08:34 PM

Randy,

I have been looking at saw blades and watched a YouTube video by Woodworkers of America. What I have come up with for my box venture is: Thin kerf with as many teeth as possible. Even thought about my non carbide plywood blades. Maybe a 10 inch Vermont American or Dewalt blade would work?

And of course practicing so I don’t screw up my project piece with better woods.

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

View maplerock's profile

maplerock

525 posts in 1260 days


#3 posted 08-12-2015 09:10 PM

I use a unisaw with a tenyru 50 tooth blade. Works fine. I do get some burning, which I hate. I have the table aligned and sharpen regularly… but any burning is too much.

I’d be interested to know how everyone stabilizes the lid for the final cut/cuts. I leave a 1/64th strip that I remove with a knife. I also use shims to prevent collapsing. Works great.

-- Jerry... making sawdust in the Knobs of Southern Indiana

View ShaneA's profile

ShaneA

6471 posts in 2059 days


#4 posted 08-12-2015 09:16 PM

I usually leave the super this strip too, then cut away with a box knife. Keeps everything in place, and a bit safer too. I usually just use a FTG rip blade, or my 40T WWII no problems with either. It is rip cut in most cases.

View Blackie_'s profile

Blackie_

4531 posts in 1973 days


#5 posted 08-12-2015 09:24 PM

Oh Shane, I’ve never used the narrow cut with box knife, I’ll give that a shot on the nest project, thanks

Thanks for all the comments, and Edward, I’m going to look into that blade as well, thanks.

-- Randy - If I'm not on LJ's then I'm making Saw Dust. Please feel free to visit my store location at http://www.facebook.com/randy.blackstock.custom.wood.designs

View Roger's profile

Roger

19865 posts in 2264 days


#6 posted 08-12-2015 11:45 PM

I like Edwards link as well. For 20 bux, what’s to loose.

-- Roger from KY. Work/Play/Travel Safe. Keep your dust collector fed. Kentuk55@yahoo.com

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

14940 posts in 2150 days


#7 posted 08-13-2015 12:12 AM

I used to cut them on my tablesaw, but now cut them on the bandsaw with a 3/4”, 2-3 TPI, bi-metallic blade from Timberwolf. I invariably would mess up one corner with the tablesaw (even when not cutting all the way through).

Your milage may vary.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View woodsmithshop's profile

woodsmithshop

1253 posts in 3006 days


#8 posted 08-13-2015 12:29 AM

I have been using a Dewalt DW3178 construction framing blade, 24 tooth, it is 7 1/4” with a 1/16” kerf, and it has worked great, I like the extra thin kerf, making it easier to balance the splines. and I leave a small amount in the kerf and cut it off later.

-- Smitty!!!

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gfadvm

14940 posts in 2150 days


#9 posted 08-13-2015 12:46 AM



I have been using a Dewalt DW3178 construction framing blade, 24 tooth, it is 7 1/4” with a 1/16” kerf, and it has worked great, I like the extra thin kerf, making it easier to balance the splines. and I leave a small amount in the kerf and cut it off later.

- woodsmithshop

That is EXACTLY how I used to cut lids off!

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View DanielP's profile

DanielP

489 posts in 1352 days


#10 posted 08-13-2015 01:29 AM

I have a slot cut out of a thin piece of plywood. Set the slot over the blade so the plywood levels everything out. Because you’re not cutting the lid entirely free you can have the blade slot fairly wide. This will allow room for fence adjustments depending on box height.

Then I lay a board across the plywood, on other side of blade, and clamp to saw.

-- --- Dan

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

17118 posts in 2566 days


#11 posted 08-13-2015 02:47 AM

I was thinking a bandsaw would do it!

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View Boxguy's profile

Boxguy

2168 posts in 1728 days


#12 posted 08-13-2015 04:45 AM

Blackie, I use a Forrest WWII. I think it is less the blade than the technique. The key to me is putting the top and bottom cut through my dual drum sander. It removes all mistakes and makes the fit perfectly. Link to top cutting technique.

-- Big Al in IN

View Blackie_'s profile

Blackie_

4531 posts in 1973 days


#13 posted 08-13-2015 11:01 AM

Andy I know what you are talking about, my cut yesterday left me with two spots on two corners, My 14” saw is not big enough for a 3/4”, I normally keep a 1/4” 10 tpi on my bandsaw with the carter stabilizer, I might give that a try.

I might also do the partial cut on the tablesaw and the rest with a box knife, I’ve not tried that yet,

Alan I don’t have a drum sander do you think it’s necessity to the shop? I can go with a 12” maybe.

-- Randy - If I'm not on LJ's then I'm making Saw Dust. Please feel free to visit my store location at http://www.facebook.com/randy.blackstock.custom.wood.designs

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

14940 posts in 2150 days


#14 posted 08-13-2015 01:00 PM

I wouldn’t do it with the Stabilizer as it will allow the blade to wander.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View DrDirt's profile

DrDirt

4167 posts in 3202 days


#15 posted 08-13-2015 04:30 PM

The blade is nearly irrelevant – - so long as it is carbide tipped, sharp and clean.

More important is to get the fence and box perfectly square – otherwise your cuts will have small shoulders at the corners.

I use a Woodworker II for nearly everything. but i find I sometimes have to use sandpaper sheet laid on my tablesaw – and use that to get the surface perfectly flat.

you are trying to avoid having to sand off the “C” error – - that little funky shoulder, because the box is a different distance from the fence when you flip 90 degrees – - happens if your box isn’t a perfect 90 at all corners – - the “89” degree side will push the box ever so slightly away from the fence compared to the other cut.

-- 'Political correctness is fascism pretending to be manners' ~George Carlin

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