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wood movement fastening w/o exposed fasteners

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Forum topic by MyChipCarving posted 08-12-2015 04:32 PM 1111 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MyChipCarving

577 posts in 2588 days


08-12-2015 04:32 PM

Topic tags/keywords: wood movement fasteners

I am building a headboard according to the drawing below.
What do you suggest as to how I should fasten the cross members to the uprights to allow for wood movement and without any exposed fasteners?
It needs to be professionally done. My friend is an architect/designer and is very particular.
Thanks for your help!
Marty

-- Marty, https://www.MyChipCarving.com, 866-444-6996


16 replies so far

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4452 posts in 3423 days


#1 posted 08-12-2015 04:37 PM

Low moisture wood, grain orientation, screws and plugs on the backside, screw holes elongated to allow movement, acclimate the wood prior to install, check moisture, check moisture again.
Only way I’d do it.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View JayT's profile

JayT

4778 posts in 1674 days


#2 posted 08-12-2015 04:37 PM

No exposed fasteners at all or just none on the front? If just not on the front, I would install pan head screws with washers from the back through slots/elongated holes in the uprights. It’d be easy to rout out a recess so that the screw heads are invisible from the side, too.

-- "Good judgement is the result of experience. A lot of experience is the result of poor judgement."

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115202 posts in 3040 days


#3 posted 08-12-2015 06:16 PM

Here’s another approach. make a sliding dovetail groove in the upright(post)lenghtwise and then make a cleat that slides in the cleat. attach the cleat to the back of the panels with screws and elongate holes.you can then just slide the dovetail cleat into the post. Make sure your cleat and dovetail in the post are a little short and that the panel hangs over the post slot so when you glue just the top couple inches of the cleat the panel can move up and down with seasonal movement on the bottom of the panel.
This description is probably as clear as mud,I wish I could do SketchUp.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

14940 posts in 2153 days


#4 posted 08-13-2015 12:21 AM

Dado the uprights and stub tenon the horizontals. A single finish nail/screw in each stub tenon.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View timbertailor's profile

timbertailor

1592 posts in 887 days


#5 posted 08-13-2015 12:31 AM

I would have just used standard headboard hardware with the brackets that slide into one another.

Real convenient when you want to move the bed. The second design in the photo could easily be hidden.

If he insists on something without exposed hardware, I agree with a1 Jim. A sliding dovetail would be trick and not too hard to incorporate.

-- Brad, Texas, https://www.youtube.com/user/tonkatoytruck/feed

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115202 posts in 3040 days


#6 posted 08-13-2015 01:11 AM

Brad I think that hardware is for rails not headboards
Re my suggestion, it might less involved to just have the cleat with the male part of the dovetail glued to the post and the female part of cut out the back of the headboard

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View SSG's profile

SSG

39 posts in 1546 days


#7 posted 08-13-2015 01:13 AM



Here s another approach. make a sliding dovetail groove in the upright(post)lenghtwise and then make a cleat that slides in the cleat. attach the cleat to the back of the panels with screws and elongate holes.you can then just slide the dovetail cleat into the post. Make sure your cleat and dovetail in the post are a little short and that the panel hangs over the post slot so when you glue just the top couple inches of the cleat the panel can move up and down with seasonal movement on the bottom of the panel.
This description is probably as clear as mud,I wish I could do SketchUp.

- a1Jim


I agree completely. I’m not big on using metal unless I gotta!

View Ghidrah's profile

Ghidrah

667 posts in 685 days


#8 posted 08-13-2015 01:49 AM

My main issue with the rail cleats is the cost; a number of rails can be modified with blocks to accept the cleats along with modifying the slats.

The expansion will be vertical; a less expensive method would be to use “L” brackets and elongate the screw holes that connect to the posts. Then T&G the slats to interlock them together, it would require 9 “L” brackets, 3 per post. The bottom 3 tighten, leave the middle and top set loose enough to move by hand so the slats will close up by their own weight.

-- I meant to do that!

View Daruc's profile

Daruc

459 posts in 596 days


#9 posted 08-13-2015 02:02 AM

I like the elongated slots and screwed from the back method for good strength.
Rout a slot all the way through the upright and countersink a slot to recess the screw head or bolt head,
(your choice of mounting hardware)
Attach each horizontal slat from the back through the slot.

-- -

View MyChipCarving's profile

MyChipCarving

577 posts in 2588 days


#10 posted 08-13-2015 02:36 AM

Jim,


Re my suggestion, it might less involved to just have the cleat with the male part of the dovetail glued to the post and the female part of cut out the back of the headboard

If the female dovetail is cut in the headboard across the grain, do you think I’ll have any short grain issues where it would be weak on the outer edges?

-- Marty, https://www.MyChipCarving.com, 866-444-6996

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MyChipCarving

577 posts in 2588 days


#11 posted 08-13-2015 02:39 AM



I like the elongated slots and screwed from the back method for good strength.
Rout a slot all the way through the upright and countersink a slot to recess the screw head or bolt head,
(your choice of mounting hardware)
Attach each horizontal slat from the back through the slot.

- woodust

I’d need a long router bit but this seems like it would work well.
Thanks

-- Marty, https://www.MyChipCarving.com, 866-444-6996

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MyChipCarving

577 posts in 2588 days


#12 posted 08-13-2015 02:43 AM



No exposed fasteners at all or just none on the front? If just not on the front, I would install pan head screws with washers from the back through slots/elongated holes in the uprights. It d be easy to rout out a recess so that the screw heads are invisible from the side, too.

- JayT

This would be good as well. Just no exposed fasteners on the front. I’d recess them from the back as it will be mounted flush to the wall.

-- Marty, https://www.MyChipCarving.com, 866-444-6996

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MyChipCarving

577 posts in 2588 days


#13 posted 08-13-2015 02:45 AM

I sure appreciate all of the help.

One more question: What would you suggest when it comes to fastening this headboard to the wall? He wants to securely fasten it to the wall so it won’t rattle around. I didn’t ask him what he plans on doing to make it rattle :-) The bed frame will be separate from this headboard.

-- Marty, https://www.MyChipCarving.com, 866-444-6996

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MyChipCarving

577 posts in 2588 days


#14 posted 08-13-2015 02:52 AM


One more question: What would you suggest when it comes to fastening this headboard to the wall? He wants to securely fasten it to the wall so it won t rattle around. I didn t ask him what he plans on doing to make it rattle :-) The bed frame will be separate from this headboard.

- MyChipCarving

And…just found out…there is a full 2×6 baseboard against the brick wall where this headboard will be attached.

-- Marty, https://www.MyChipCarving.com, 866-444-6996

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115202 posts in 3040 days


#15 posted 08-13-2015 03:20 AM

Marty I would make the male part of the dovetail out of something like hard rock maple for extra strength or even Ipe but if you use Ipe I would screw it to the post instead of gluing it , The Cherry should be plenty strong for the female part of the equation as long as you don’t cut the dovetail too deep.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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