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Forum topic by missesalot posted 08-12-2015 03:36 PM 882 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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missesalot

102 posts in 1063 days


08-12-2015 03:36 PM

Hey all,
Looking at building some cabinets for my home office and would like to do solid wood shaker or raised panel for the doors. I have a pile of skip planed 7/8” walnut that I plan to use for the face frames and door frames. Whats the best way to get thin stock for the panels? i hate to plane down the 7/8 stock to 1/2” or less and i don;t have a way to resaw. I’m thinking I’m SOL on options but figured I’d ask if I’m missing something. Thanks for the rookie help


11 replies so far

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johnstoneb

2143 posts in 1637 days


#1 posted 08-12-2015 03:49 PM

With 7/8” skip planed you won’t have a lot left after a resaw. To get the 7/8 cleaned up on the planer you will be looking at 3/4” with a 1/16” kerf and 1/16 for the planer You will use 5/8” to get to 1/2” That leave about 1/8” left. When I resaw and need 1/2” I use 1” skip stock that leaves me with a 1/2” and a 1/4” piece of dimensioned stock.
You could plane it to 1/2” without loosing too much. I don’t like to plane off that much either. I realize this doesn’t help your problem much but it does show what you would lose in resaw.
You might look at plywood for the panels. You wouldn’t be able to do raised panel.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

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benmarvin

13 posts in 957 days


#2 posted 08-18-2015 10:32 PM

You could resaw it by hand, but that’s not very fun. You could also do say 75% of a resaw on a table saw by flipping the board, doing multiple passes and raising the blade several times. You might want to shut the saw off when making adjustments. Then you can finish the final cut in the middle with a hand saw then run through the planer.

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bondogaposis

4031 posts in 1815 days


#3 posted 08-18-2015 11:03 PM

You could make your panels from 1/4” plywood and save the wood for other parts of the cabinet. I’ve seen beautiful walnut plywood that would make great door panels at my lumber supplier. That would solve some of your problems and save you from converting a lot of good wood into planer shavings.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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joey502

487 posts in 982 days


#4 posted 08-18-2015 11:19 PM

Walnut plywood is not cheap but I think it is the way to go. The stability of the plywood panel vs a solid panel is an added benefit. The walnut boards you planned to use for the panels could be used on the next project.

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missesalot

102 posts in 1063 days


#5 posted 09-09-2015 01:21 PM

when using plywood for panels, is it important to bury the entire edge of the plywood into the groove in the frame? What I am thinking is using 1/2” ply for a more solid feel, in that case would I need to rabbet the edge of the panel to fit into a quarter inch slot, or would it be more sensible to make a 1/2” slot and bury the whole thing for a clean look?

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rwe2156

2194 posts in 945 days


#6 posted 09-09-2015 01:39 PM

Raised panels are usually 3/4 thick.

For thin solid wood panels I would resaw to 3/8” and plane to thickness.

You can also do a “reversed” raised panel where the flat is facing outward.
This give a little heavier door you might prefer that.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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missesalot

102 posts in 1063 days


#7 posted 09-09-2015 01:51 PM

right, I was refering to plywood panels. Shaker style, I guess just not traditional.

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BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1834 days


#8 posted 09-09-2015 01:59 PM

You can absolutely rabbet the 1/2” ply to fit in the groove. The first set of doors I built for our island used 1/4” panels (not large doors), and next time I need plywood panels, I’d do 1/2” for a more solid feel.

Like rwe said, you can do a reversed solid panel. You’d do it the same way as the plywood w/ rabbet, just don’t glue the panel in, and leave some room for expansion/contraction.

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

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BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1834 days


#9 posted 09-09-2015 02:02 PM

Another additional benefit to doing solid wood, reversed raised panels, is that when you’ve planned out an entire kitchen remodel, and your wife changes her mind on what she wants, and decides she now wants raised panels on the front, you don’t really have to change your plans much. I speak from personal experience (facepalm).

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

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missesalot

102 posts in 1063 days


#10 posted 09-09-2015 02:07 PM

so reversed raised panels are typically 3/4”, does that mean that the frame stock should be thicker than 3/4”? if not wouldn’t the side of the panel facing in protrude past the frame of the door?

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BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1834 days


#11 posted 09-09-2015 02:12 PM

They don’t have to be a full 3/4”, they can be whatever you want them to be. If they are a full 3/4”, like you said, they will protrude into the cabinet by whatever recess you have on the front. This may or may not be an issue for you (hitting shelves, dishes, etc), but if you’re doing a face frame, typically your shelves will be set back 3/4” from the inside of an full overlay door anyways (not so much with full/partial inset doors). My original plans had a 3/4” door, with a 5/8” panel recessed 1/8”, so it’d be flush with the door frame on the inside.

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

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