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Help identifying chisels

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Forum topic by macdo posted 08-12-2015 12:41 PM 782 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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macdo

29 posts in 1403 days


08-12-2015 12:41 PM

Topic tags/keywords: chisel question tip turning

Hi guys, I bought in an ebay auction 8 Robert Sorby Chisels + 1 japanese, but as Im kinda a newbie, is hard to identify the gouges… I’ll appreciate if you could help me.
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And this beast…is it an skew chisel or scraper?
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Thanks in advance and best regards,
macdo


10 replies so far

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

4997 posts in 3124 days


#1 posted 08-12-2015 02:02 PM

The ‘beast’ is not a skew … looks like a heavy square scraper.

Of the other four tools, #2 looks like a spindle roughing gouge. The other three appear (can’t tell for sure what #1 is) to be old fashioned spindle gouges. Also can’t tell if these are carbon steel or HSS.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

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macdo

29 posts in 1403 days


#2 posted 08-12-2015 02:07 PM

Hi, thanks for the fast answer, they are HSS, Im uploading another pic with a different angle to see if it helps…

Thanks!!

View Ron Ford's profile

Ron Ford

200 posts in 1193 days


#3 posted 08-12-2015 03:27 PM

From the angle of the new photo, I’d guess the first two on the left to be roughing gouges, the third one a scraper, and the fourth a detail spindle gouge. I agree with TheDane that the wide flat one in the first post is a wide flat scraper.

Ron

-- Once in awhile I make something really great. Most days I just make sawdust.

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macdo

29 posts in 1403 days


#4 posted 08-12-2015 04:15 PM

Oh bummer, I though the first one was a bowl gouge, is there a way to grind it to make it work as a bowl gouge?

Thanks!

View ForestGrl's profile

ForestGrl

445 posts in 547 days


#5 posted 08-14-2015 05:04 PM

I’m a relative newbie, but what I’ve read and been told about roughing gouges is that they are relatively weak—note the smallish tang that inserts in the handle. It might be unsafe to convert and use it as a bowl gouge, which have a stronger design.

-- My mother said that anyone learning to cook needed a large dog to eat the mistakes. As a sculptor of wood I have always tried to keep a fireplace. (Norman Ridenour)

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TheDane

4997 posts in 3124 days


#6 posted 08-14-2015 05:29 PM

Oh bummer, I though the first one was a bowl gouge, is there a way to grind it to make it work as a bowl gouge?

No … you would be creating a hazard that could injure you. ForestGrl is spot on … the tang (where the steel goes into the handle) is a weak point and a good catch could bend or break it and rip it right out of your hands.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

7171 posts in 2038 days


#7 posted 08-14-2015 05:32 PM

http://www.thompsonlathetools.com

Thompson bowl gouges are of good value.

Good luck now :)

View ForestGrl's profile

ForestGrl

445 posts in 547 days


#8 posted 08-15-2015 02:56 AM

How are your sharpening skills, have you any gouges yet that you’ve worked on? One thing I learned, the easy way for once, is to learn to sharpen on cheap chisels (this coming from a very sharpening-challenged person!). Although there is an argument that it’s not that expensive to learn on an expensive gouge. I just got less frustrated when the steel continued to disappear and I still didn’t get it. :-( If your tool isn’t sharp, you’re wasting your time spinning wood! (oooo, that was a little strong). But it can be a little unsafe too.

-- My mother said that anyone learning to cook needed a large dog to eat the mistakes. As a sculptor of wood I have always tried to keep a fireplace. (Norman Ridenour)

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

4997 posts in 3124 days


#9 posted 08-15-2015 11:49 AM

If your tool isn’t sharp, you re wasting your time spinning wood! (oooo, that was a little strong). But it can be a little unsafe too.

Spot on … as Mike Peace says: “If it’s almost sharp it will almost cut”.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

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ForestGrl

445 posts in 547 days


#10 posted 08-16-2015 06:52 AM



If your tool isn t sharp, you re wasting your time spinning wood! (oooo, that was a little strong). But it can be a little unsafe too.

Spot on … as Mike Peace says: “If it s almost sharp it will almost cut”.

- TheDane


I’ve noticed it also tends to burnish the wood, probably because, being dull, it must be held more firmly against. Not a good thing.

-- My mother said that anyone learning to cook needed a large dog to eat the mistakes. As a sculptor of wood I have always tried to keep a fireplace. (Norman Ridenour)

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